BPC 157 could potentially be an effective therapy in aging process. It has a wide range of effects on the body. — L/U (2022)

White Paper by Ben Kronz

Peer-reviewed by Kritika Phatak

Body protein compound 157 (BPC-157) has shown to have a wide range of effects on the body, this is due to its therapeutic effects on the stomach and intestinal tract. [26,27,30] It has been shown to be an anti-ulcer, alleviates inflammatory bowel syndrome, stimulates tendon and tissue healing, promotes angiogenesis, and even has an effect on brain health. [1,14,15,9,28, 29] BPC-157 could potentially be an effective therapy for aging populations as the mucous membrane loses integrity with increased age. [16,31,32]

BPC-157 and Angiogenesis

Angiogenesis plays a large role in the aging process and if reversed could have a significant effect on longevity and overall health. Researchers have found that BPC-157 is a powerful tool for healthy aging by the upregulation of angiogenesis.[33,34] The process of Angiogenesis is the growth of new capillaries in an organism. [1] As we age the risk of having an ischemia doubles every 10 years after turning 55. [2,35,36] This is important because the angiogenesis of blood capillaries is important for the recovery from ischemia. Also, the downregulation of angiogenesis has shown to cause heart problems, if there is an imbalance between cardiovascular tissue and blood vessels, this has shown to increase the chances of heart failure. [6, 37,38,39] If Angiogenesis can be upregulated then the aging health and life expectancy could potentially be extended.

Mechanisms of Angiogenesis

As people age, there is a loss of function in many parts of the angiogenic pathway that are also important in the aging process. [40,41] Researchers have found that as we age there is a significant drop off in the Hypoxia-inducible factor - 1ɑ (HIF-1ɑ), PCG-1ɑ, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)[3,42,43,44]. These are all very important in the angiogenic pathway (figure 1), HIF-1ɑ and PCG-1ɑ promote Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) which is one of the crucial growth factors that regulate capillary growth.[45,46] As we age the levels of HIF-1ɑ and PCG-1ɑ decrease.[4,47] eNOS is also important for this process as it produces nitric oxide which directly activates the angiogenic process, and as we age the eNOS can become uncoupled from its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, this results in the loss of NO in the endothelial cells of the capillaries. [5,48,49] The process of angiogenesis is clear and can be reversed by peptides such as BPC-157. [50]

Figure 1: The Angiogenic Pathway [3]

BPC-157 has shown to have a wide range of effects on the body, one of the most important for longevity is its role in angiogenesis. L, Bric et al looked into the effects of angiogenesis on muscles and tendons on mice that had an induced injury. He found that there was a significant increase in the angiogenic response in mice with BPC-157.[51] Because of this process, the mice had a faster muscle and tendon repair compared to the control. [4] This happens because the BPC-157 upregulates some of the essential parts of the Angiogenic pathway that we have previously discussed. It has shown to upregulate VEGF, CD34, and FVIII in the rats that were given BPC-157. [4,52,] We have looked into the effects of VEGF in the role of angiogenesis as it upregulates the eNOS enzyme and, therefore, the amount of NO in the organism for capillary regeneration. [4,52] BPC-157 has also shown to have a direct effect on the levels of NO in the organism as well; it has proved to deactivate the effects of the NOS-inhibitors and the NO-precursor. [7,54] These have direct effects on angiogenesis.[55,56] CD34 and FVIII show to be expressed in the formation of endothelial cells [8,53,57] A higher expression of CD34 and FVIII indicate that the process of angiogenesis is activated. [58]

Figure 2: The levels of indicators and promoters of angiogenesis over time in muscle tissue. Legend: N- number of positive elements, full line- BPC 157 treated animals; broken line- controls; time- time after transection; *- statistically significant difference (p<0.05). [4]

BPC 157 and Healing Tissues

The upregulation of Angiogenesis can have significant effects on the healing process of crushed muscle or tendons. [59,60] Researchers found that there is a significant difference in the rate at which muscles and tendons can repair themselves when on BPC-157. [4,61] The muscles were able to get back to normal faster both macroscopically (no post-injury leg contracture) and microscopically as enzyme activity in the muscle cells were able to get back to normal levels more quickly. [4] This could be very effective in helping the aging population bounce back from muscle and tendon damage as well as recovery of stroke as the peptide upregulates angiogenesis. [62,63]

BPC-157 and the Brain

The role of BPC-157 on the brain is quite intriguing; we have noted that BPC-157 has a wide range of effects on the body. [26,64] We will focus on its role in the GI tract and how gut health affects the brain. The Gut-Brain Axis (GBA) is how BPC-157 has a therapeutic effect on the brain through the gut. It is a two-way communication center between the central and enteric nervous systems. [9,65] This links the emotional and neurological regions of the brain to the gut and its health. [66] This functions as a way to keep the gastric juices in the stomach balanced and helps maintain the overall homeostasis of the GI tract. [67] This has also shown to link to higher cognitive functions like emotion and motivation. [9,65,66] This is all mediated by the vagus nerve connecting the enteric nervous system and the central nervous system. [68] This crosstalk between the brain and the gut is the mechanism in which BPC-157 specifically targets the gut which therefore affects the brain. [10] BPC-157 is a potent anti-ulcer agent and cytoprotective agent for the gut. [69] The effects on the brain are accomplished by maintaining GI mucous integrity. [11,70]

Figure 1: The Brain-Gut Axis/ How the CNS and the GI communicate.[22]

Studies show that BPC-157 regulates the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems by helping the GI tract return to homeostasis. [71] This is accomplished by stimulating nerve regeneration of damaged neurons from the overstimulation of neurotransmitters. [11] There are multiple ways in which BPC-157 stimulates nerve health and nerve regeneration. BPC-157 stimulates the Egr-1 gene, NAB2, and JAK-2 in the brain. [9,72,73,74] The Erg-1 gene product produces a zinc finger-type enzyme and has been identified in nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cells in rat fibroblasts. [12] This PC12 cell line is a model for cell differentiation in Rat fibroblasts and showed to have an upregulation of Erg-1 in the cell nucleus which shows its probable link to nerve regeneration. [12.75,76] NAB2 has also proved to be important for the brain in both the myelination of neurons and gene transcription. It is essential in transcription because it controls the length of the poly-A tail of the 3’ end of mRNA; this is important for the preservation of mRNA and the production of proteins in the brain. [13,77,78] This pathway is essential as it prevents demyelination, the result of diseases like Multiple sclerosis (MS). [17] The JAK-2 pathways are involved in cytokine regulation and immune function, the mechanism is not yet clear. Still, it has shown to be important as mouse models with the JAK-2 gene knocked out the mouse died around the 8th week of its life, compared to the average lifespan of a mouse is two years. [18]

Figure 4: The molecular structure of peptide BPC-157. [23]

These pathways are essential for the brain and its higher level of processing, as they have shown to balance the central/neural dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. [19,20,79] It has been shown to specifically induce the release of serotonin in specific regions of the brain. [80] This can help repair these systems as aging populations have damaged dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. Dopamine levels drop off by 10% per decade since young adulthood. [21,81,82] This is associated with a decrease in cognitive and motor function. [83,84] The receptors for dopamine decrease as the levels of dopamine decrease. [85] This is significant as BPC-157 has shown to rebalance the receptor level of dopamine in the brain. [9] Serotonin levels also drop off as we age, [86] resulting in a decrease in synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. [87] This is important for the efficiency of the brain as we grow older as the loss of synaptic plasticity inhibits synaptic pruning. [21,88] The therapeutic effects reach past aging and dopaminergic and serotonergic homeostasis. Research has shown it to be useful for repairing lesions in the stomach caused by alcohol, insulin, or NSAIDs. [9] It has also proved to be beneficial for Parkinson’s patients as it interacts with the MPTP, which causes permanent damage to dopaminergic regions in the basal ganglia. [24] It has also been shown that BPC-157 reverses damage caused by amphetamines in the central dopaminergic system, such as neuronal damage, reduced dopaminergic activity, and dopaminergic vesicle depletion. [9,25] Another application of BPC-157 is in aging populations with MS. The NAB2 pathway seems to interact with the neurons to reduce demyelination in the brain, which explains the reduction in the symptoms of rats who had induced MS by cuprizone. [9] BPC-157 has a wide range of effects on the body and can be very useful in a clinical setting for those with the brain, GI, or blood vessel problems that could benefit from this therapy.

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(Video) What Is BPC-157 & How To Use It

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(Video) - BPC 157 - | Cure-All Compound | Healing Binaural Beats (Body & Mind Recovery)

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[64] Staresinic, M., Petrovic, I., Novinscak, T., Jukic, I., Pevec, D., Suknaic, S., ... & Zoric, Z. (2006). Effective therapy of transected quadriceps muscle in rat: gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Journal of orthopaedic research, 24(5), 1109-1117.

(Video) Peptide Injection Therapy Guide | Injecting Myself With BPC-157, CJC-1295, Ipamorelin

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[70] Ilić, S., Brčić, I., Mešter, M., Filipović, M., Sever, M., Kliček, R., ... & Berkopić, L. (2009). Over-dose insulin and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. attenuated gastric ulcers, seizures, brain lesions, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, breakdown of liver glycogen, profound hypoglycemia and calcification in rats. Journal of physiology and pharmacology, 60(S7), 107.

[71] Jelovac, N., Sikiric, P., Rucman, R., Petek, M., Marovic, A., Perovic, D., ... & Miklic, P. (1999). Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 attenuates disturbances induced by neuroleptics: the effect on catalepsy and gastric ulcers in mice and rats. European journal of pharmacology, 379(1), 19-31.

[72] Tkalcević, V. I., Cuzić, S., Brajsa, K., Mildner, B., Bokulić, A., Situm, K., Perović, D., Glojnarić, I., & Parnham, M. J. (2007). Enhancement by PL 14736 of granulation and collagen organization in healing wounds and the potential role of egr-1 expression. European journal of pharmacology, 570(1-3), 212–221. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2007.05.072

[73] Chang, C. H., Tsai, W. C., Lin, M. S., Hsu, Y. H., & Pang, J. H. (2011). The promoting effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on tendon healing involves tendon outgrowth, cell survival, and cell migration. Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 110(3), 774–780. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00945.2010

[74] .-H. Chang, W.-C. Tsai, Y.-H. Hsu, and J.-H. Pang, “Pen-tadecapeptide BPC 157 enhances the growth hormone re-ceptor expression in tendon fibroblasts,”Molecules, vol. 19,no. 11, pp. 19066–19077, 2014.

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[76] Jones, E. A., Jang, S. W., Mager, G. M., Chang, L. W., Srinivasan, R., Gokey, N. G., Ward, R. M., Nagarajan, R., & Svaren, J. (2007). Interactions of Sox10 and Egr2 in myelin gene regulation. Neuron glia biology, 3(4), 377–387. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1740925X08000173

[77] St-Sauveur, V. G., Soucek, S., Corbett, A. H., & Bachand, F. (2013). Poly (A) tail-mediated gene regulation by opposing roles of Nab2 and Pab2 nuclear poly (A)-binding proteins in pre-mRNA decay. Molecular and cellular biology, 33(23), 4718-4731.

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[79] Sikiric, P., Hahm, K.-B., Blagaic, A. B., Tvrdeic, A., Pavlov, K. H., Petrovic, A., Kokot, A., Gojkovic, S., Krezic, I., Drmic, D., Rucman, R., & Seiwerth, S. (2020). Stable Gastric Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, Robert’s Stomach Cytoprotection/Adaptive Cytoprotection/Organoprotection, and Selye’s Stress Coping Response: Progress, Achievements, and the Future. Gut and Liver, 14(2), 153–167. https://doi.org/10.5009/gnl18490

[80] Tohyama, Y., Sikirić, P., & Diksic, M. (2004). Effects of pentadecapeptide BPC157 on regional serotonin synthesis in the rat brain: alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan autoradiographic measurements. Life sciences, 76(3), 345–357. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2004.08.010

[81] Austin, J. H., Connole, E., Kett, D., & Collins, J. (1978). Studies in aging of the brain. V. Reduced norepinephrine, dopamine, and cyclic AMP in rat brain with advancing age. Age, 1(4), 121-124.

[82] Creasey, H., & Rapoport, S. I. (1985). The aging human brain. Annals of Neurology: Official Journal of the American Neurological Association and the Child Neurology Society, 17(1), 2-10.

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(Video) Anti-Aging, BPC-157, and Regenerating The Damaged Body | Patrick Kroupa ~ ATTMind 78

(Video) What Is BPC-157 and Should You Take It to Enhance Healing?

FAQs

Does BPC 157 release growth hormone? ›

In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon.

Does BPC 157 have a systemic effect? ›

Currently, all studies investigating BPC 157 have demonstrated consistently positive and prompt healing effects for various injury types, both traumatic and systemic and for a plethora of soft tissues.

What does BPC 157 do to the brain? ›

BPC 157 stimulates the repair of neurons in the brain, and could be a potent healing inducer after traumatic brain injury. It can decrease the effectiveness of many neurotoxic substances, and can even prevent seizures, brain lesions, and other harmful processes due to insulin overdose.

What does BPC 157 help with? ›

Peptide BPC-157 has been shown to accelerate wound healing not only at the surface—where it can treat skin burns, improve blood flow, and increase collagen production—but also repair ligament and tendon-to-bone damage. Relief from discomfort has been observed in people who have: Muscle sprains.

Can BPC 157 heal bone? ›

Contrary to this, BPC 157 - using same regimens like in gastrointestinal healing studies - improves tendon, ligament and bone healing, accurately implementing its own angiogenic effect in the healing.

Does BPC 157 work orally? ›

Likewise, BPC 157 was effective given per-orally (0.16 microg/ml in the drinking water (12 ml/day/rat)) until sacrifice. Commonly, BPC 157 microg-ng-rats exhibited consistent functional, biomechanical, macroscopic and histological healing improvements.

What are the dangers of BPC 157? ›

What Are The Side-Effects of BPC-157?
  • Fatigue and tiredness.
  • Dizziness.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Possibility of liver and kidney toxicity.
  • Hot flashes (feeling hot and cold)
  • Changes in blood pressure.
  • Possibility of heart complications (stroke, abnormal heart rhythms)
  • Cancer.

Does BPC 157 reduce inflammation? ›

The pentadecapeptide BPC 157 has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and wound healing effects on multiple target tissues and organs.

Is BPC 157 FDA approved? ›

Therapeutically, the synthetically produced peptide BPC-157 is not currently approved for use as a human drug.

Does BPC 157 repair nerve damage? ›

In animals, BPC 157 has an anti-inflammatory effect and therapeutic effects in functional recovery and the rescue of somatosensory neurons in the sciatic nerve after transection, upon brain injury after concussive trauma, and in severe encephalopathies.

Does BPC 157 increase dopamine? ›

Therefore, it seems that this gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 has a modulatory effect on dopamine system, and it could be used in both acute and chronic amphetamine disturbances [57].

How do you take a BPC 157 for gut health? ›

BPC-157 peptide therapy can be administered in several different ways, including via subcutaneous injections, oral capsules, and nasal sprays. When using BPC-157 to improve gut health specifically, oral capsules are primarily used to allow for the easiest absorption.

Does BPC 157 help with Covid? ›

The compiled findings suggest BPC 157, in animal models, is an effective therapy for disturbances in the cardiovascular system that are commonly seen in COVID-19 patients.

How long is BPC 157 in your system? ›

BPC 157 was stable in urine for at least 4 days. The specificity of the method is improved by measurement of a potential BPC metabolite along with the parent peptide.

Does BPC 157 work for cartilage? ›

BPC157 has the potential to repair tears, build cartilage and reduce the number of knee surgeries. Because of its reparative properties, treatment with BPC157 offers advantages over the use of steroids.

Is BPC 157 good for your liver? ›

Benefits of BPC – 157 | Recovery Peptide include:

REDUCES INFLAMMATION – Reflux, GERD, and Gut repair. REGENERATIVE FUNCTION OF LIVER – Liver disease. ULCER REPAIR – Helps protect internal organs. TENDON/LIGAMENT REPAIR – Accelerate and help with muscle and tendon damage.

What amino acids are in BPC 157? ›

BPC-157 (also known as PL 14736) is a pentadecapeptide. It has the amino acid sequence Gly-Glu-Pro-Pro-Pro-Gly-Lys-Pro-Ala-Asp-Asp-Ala-Gly-Leu-Val. This peptide has a molecular formula of C62H98N16O22.

Do peptides show up in urine tests? ›

The developed SPE procedure and LC-HRMS method can theoretically detect virtually all peptides present at a sufficient concentration in a sample. New peptides can be readily included in the method to be detected without method re-development.

Are peptides illegal? ›

A peptide is a short chain of amino acids joined together by a bond and is used to increase the body's production of the growth hormone. It is illegal to buy and use peptides for purposes other than research. Potential side effects of peptide supplementation include: Tingling or numbness in the extremities.

Where does BPC 157 come from? ›

Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, composed of 15 amino acids, is a partial sequence of body protection compound (BPC) that is discovered in and isolated from human gastric juice. Experimentally it has been demonstrated to accelerate the healing of many different wounds, including transected rat Achilles tendon.

Is BPC 157 or TB500 better? ›

Healing peptides

BPC 157 is particularly effective for the gastrointestinal system and the musculoskeletal system, while TB500 is often used to speed up injuries or wounds that heal slowly. TB500 is also a good option for chronic injuries that do not seem to be healing.

Are peptides safe? ›

For healthy individuals, peptide supplements are unlikely to cause serious side effects because they are similar to the peptides present in everyday foods. Oral peptide supplements may not enter the bloodstream as the body may break them down into individual amino acids.

What does TB 500 do? ›

TB-500 has been used topically to treat injuries of the skin and eyes successfully. Interestingly, aside from its wound-healing and regenerative properties, TB-500 has also increased hair growth. Topical TB-500 applications on an every-other-day basis has been proven to accelerate hair growth.

How long is a peptide? ›

Peptides are smaller than proteins. Traditionally, peptides are defined as molecules that consist of between 2 and 50 amino acids, whereas proteins are made up of 50 or more amino acids.

What does thymosin beta 4 do to the body? ›

Thymosin β(4) binds to actin and promotes cell migration, including the mobilization, migration, and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells, which form new blood vessels and regenerate the tissue. Thymosin β(4) also decreases the number of myofibroblasts in wounds, resulting in decreased scar formation and fibrosis.

How long does it take BPC 157 to start working? ›

Then, you can take BPC-157 either orally or through injections. These injections are placed just under the surface of the skin in the stomach or at the hip. While some users have claimed to get results in the very first week, it typically takes four to six weeks to feel as though you've healed.

Does anything regrow cartilage? ›

Cartilage Regeneration Options

MACI is a surgical procedure that uses cartilage-forming cells from your body to restore damaged cartilage in the knees. It involves a biopsy to harvest chondrocytes (cartilage-forming cells), which are allowed to multiply in a lab, and surgery to implant them into the damaged area.

Can peptides regrow cartilage? ›

A number of peptides have been engineered to regenerate cartilage by acting as scaffolds, functional molecules, or both.

When should I inject BPC 157? ›

Its common dosage range is from 200mcg to 400mcg twice daily. If BPC-157 is used twice daily, the intramuscular injection needs to be close to the injury as possible. BPC-157 is used from 2-4 weeks before discontinuing it. Then after which, cut the therapy for two weeks and restart once again when needed.

How long is BPC 157 in your system? ›

BPC 157 was stable in urine for at least 4 days. The specificity of the method is improved by measurement of a potential BPC metabolite along with the parent peptide.

Is BPC 157 androgenic? ›

BPC-157 is not a steroid. It is a peptide, or chain of amino acids. It does not have the anabolic or androgenic effects of AAS. Instead, it may assist athletes by assisting the repair and regeneration of muscles and connective tissues among other benefits.

What does TB 500 do? ›

TB-500 has been used topically to treat injuries of the skin and eyes successfully. Interestingly, aside from its wound-healing and regenerative properties, TB-500 has also increased hair growth. Topical TB-500 applications on an every-other-day basis has been proven to accelerate hair growth.

What foods increase growth hormone naturally? ›

Healthy food keeps the HGH production rate to an optimum, by keeping track of your body fat and insulin levels. To maintain a normal range of human growth hormones in the blood, foods rich in melatonin, such as eggs, fish, mustard seeds, tomatoes, nuts, grapes, and raspberries are highly recommended by experts.

Does melatonin increase HGH levels? ›

Melatonin and resistance exercise alone have been shown to increase the levels of growth hormone (GH).

What herbs increase growth hormone? ›

Ginseng is a popular Chinese herb promoted for its ability to increase hormone production in men, including HGH.

What are the dangers of BPC 157? ›

What Are The Side-Effects of BPC-157?
  • Fatigue and tiredness.
  • Dizziness.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Possibility of liver and kidney toxicity.
  • Hot flashes (feeling hot and cold)
  • Changes in blood pressure.
  • Possibility of heart complications (stroke, abnormal heart rhythms)
  • Cancer.

Does BPC 157 reduce inflammation? ›

The pentadecapeptide BPC 157 has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and wound healing effects on multiple target tissues and organs.

Is BPC 157 FDA approved? ›

Therapeutically, the synthetically produced peptide BPC-157 is not currently approved for use as a human drug.

Does BPC 157 cross the blood brain barrier? ›

Accordingly, regional serotonin synthesis in the rat brain, assessed by α-methyl-L-tryptophan autoradiographic measurements showed that, BPC 157 given peripherally may readily cross the blood–brain barrier, affect region-specific brain 5-HT synthesis in rats leading to significantly increased synthesis in the ...

Where can I buy legit peptides? ›

The Top 10 Best Places To Buy Research Peptides
  1. Blue sky peptide. Is one of the leading sites that sells American made research peptides and research liquids. ...
  2. Peptides Warehouse. ...
  3. Recon peptides. ...
  4. Geo peptides. ...
  5. Buy peptides. ...
  6. USA peptide. ...
  7. Iron dragon. ...
  8. Real peptide.

Where does BPC 157 come from? ›

Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, composed of 15 amino acids, is a partial sequence of body protection compound (BPC) that is discovered in and isolated from human gastric juice. Experimentally it has been demonstrated to accelerate the healing of many different wounds, including transected rat Achilles tendon.

What does follistatin 344 do? ›

Follistatin-344 (Austropeptide, Fujian, China) is a peptide-structured performance and image enhancing drug (PIED) which is generally used by bodybuilding athletes to increase muscle mass.

What does TB500 feel like? ›

TB500 is deemed both safe and effective, with minimal side effects associated. If side effects do occur, symptoms usually include reddening, pain, and discomfort at the injection site. Headaches and lethargy are also possible in first-dose injections, but these symptoms subside promptly.

Videos

1. BPC 157 detailed explanation
(Rejuvenate Medical Group)
2. BPC-157 || Peptides Episode 1 || Healing Your ENTIRE Body
(Ryan Ankrom)
3. BPC 157 for muscle injury healing
(Dr. David Geier)
4. Episode 36 - AMA: CJC/IPA Dosage, Ehlers Danlos at 26, BPC 157 in Angiogenesis, Low Iron
(William Seeds MD)
5. Peptide BPC157: Patients Discuss Their Personal Experience and How this peptide Changed Their Lives!
(Revitalyze MD)
6. CHL#3 BPC 157 - Is it effective in repairing joint pain?
(Chasing Health and Longevity)

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