Esophageal manifestations of rheumatic disorders (2022)

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Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism Abstract References (149) Gastroenterology J Pediatr Am J Med Gastroenterology Am J Med Semin Arthritis Rheum Gastroenterology Surg Clin North Am Chest Semin Arthritis Rheum Am J Med Semin Arthritis Rheum Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Am J Med Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Gastroenterology Lancet A gallup survey on heartburn across America Heartburn, dysphagia, odynophagia, and other esophageal symptoms Acid gastroesophageal reflex and symptom recurrence: Analysis of some factors influencing their association Dig Dis Sci Gastroesophageal reflux: pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy Ann Intern Med Clinical spectrum and diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflex disease Evaluation of dysphagia: a careful history is crucial Dysphagia Respiratory patterns associated with swallowing: Part 1. The normal adult pattern and changes with age Age Ageing Esophageal testing in patients with noncardiac chest pain and/or dysphagia Ann Intern Med The esophagus and noncardiac chest pain Angina-like esophageal pain: differentiation from cardiac pain by history J Clin Gastroenterol Esophageal chest pain: Current controversies in pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy Ann Intern Med Respiratory complications of gastroesophageal reflux Arch Intern Med Radionuclide transit studies in the detection of oesophageal dysmotility Gut Evaluation and treatment of swallowing disorders Esophageal motility disorders in the rheumatic diseases: a review of 150 patients Clin Exp Rheum Acid perfusion test and 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring with symptom index: comparison of tests for esophageal acid sensitivity Dig Dis Sci Edrophonium provocative test in non-cardiac chest pain: evaluation of testing techniques Dig Dis Sci Edrophonium: A useful provocative test for esophageal chest pain Ann Intern Med Dysphagia due to vertical subluxation of the axis in rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatol Rehabil Computerized tomography in evaluation of atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis J Rheumatoi Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and subluxations of the cervical spine Arthritis Rheum Effects of systemic and extraintestinal disease on the gut Rheumatoid esophageal disease Am J Gastroenterol Rheumatoid stricture of oesophagus Br Med J Esophago-bronchial fistula in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis J Rheumatol Rheumatoid vasculitis of the colon presenting as pancolitis Dig Dis Sci Effect of antiinflammatory drug administration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: An endoscopic assessment Scand J Gastroenterol Hypergastrinaemia in rheumatoid arthritis Clin Exp Rheumatol Cited by (22) Recommended articles (6) FAQs Videos
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Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism

Volume 26, Issue 4,

February 1997

, Pages 641-666

Abstract

This study was performed to review information on functional and anatomic esophageal manifestations in patients with rheumatic disorders and to outline their pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment in light of the current medical, endoscopic, and surgical advances. A MEDLINE search of English-language articles published between 1985 and 1995, reviews of the bibliographies of textbooks, and a manual search of the reference lists of relevant articles formed the data sources, all combined with our own clinical experience. Primary research and review articles addressing the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and complications of esophageal disease occurring in a rheumatic context were selected, with emphasis on recently developed medical, endoscopic, and surgical methods for diagnosis and management. Study design and quality were assessed, with particular attention paid to methods and aims. Relevant data on frequency, clinical presentation, and relationship to underlying rheumatic disorder, prognosis, and clinical management were analyzed. Esophageal manifestations are common in patients with rheumatic diseases and range in nature and severity from functional myopathic or neuropathic esophageal dysmotility to extrinsic lumenal compression and esophageal mucosal damage from gastroesophageal acid reflux or opportunistic infection. The primary symptoms of heartburn, dysphagia, odynophagia, chest pain, and bleeding may be directly related to the underlying rheumatic disease or may be the unwanted effects of therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressants, or disease-modifying agents. Easily over-looked in the context of a multisystemic disease, these esophageal symptoms may be amenable to simple treatments, but frequently require a thorough assessment by modern, sophisticated diagnostic tools. In many instances, functional and structural involvement of the esophagus in patients with rheumatic disorders requires a high index of suspicion for an early diagnosis, correct assessment, intensive surveillance, and aggressive therapy to avoid end-organ damage and decline in quality of life. Significant recent advances in the understanding of esophageal pathophysiology, the development of diagnostic techniques, progress in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy, and minimally invasive surgery allow early detection and effective long-term therapy for esophageal dysfunction associated with rheumatic diseases.

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      2018, Dubois' Lupus Erythematosus and Related Syndromes

      Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Diagnosis of SLE is often delayed when GI symptoms are the initial presenting manifestation. GI symptoms in SLE are usually mild and often caused by infections or medication side effects. However, a wide variety of GI manifestations may be seen among patients with SLE, especially those with moderate to severely active disease. GI involvement in SLE can be life-threatening. Clinical presentations of GI lupus are nonspecific and can be difficult to differentiate from infectious, thrombotic, therapy-related, and non-SLE etiologies. Timely recognition, correct attribution, and appropriate treatment of GI manifestations in a patient with SLE are thus important to improve the prognosis.

    • Digestive Involvement in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome

      2017, Handbook of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

      The study found slow acid clearance in the esophagus of SS patients with GER, suggesting a prolonged duration of reflux. This extended exposure of the esophagus to refluxed acid may result either from defective acid neutralization by salivary bicarbonates or from altered esophageal motility [21–24]. Ho et al. [25] described a high frequency of tertiary waves in patients with markedly abnormal pH that were significantly associated with the total reflux time, suggesting a relationship between these contractions and prolonged exposure of the esophageal mucosa to low pH values.

      (Video) Diagnosis and Treatment for Esophageal and Motility Disorders Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital

      Sjögren’s syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease that mainly affects the exocrine glands and usually presents as persistent dryness of the mouth and eyes due to functional impairment of the salivary and lacrimal glands. The histological hallmark is a focal lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands, and the spectrum of the disease extends from an organ-specific autoimmune disease (autoimmune exocrinopathy) to a systemic process with diverse extraglandular manifestations.

    • Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Manifestations: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and the Gastrointestinal Tract

      2013, Dubois' Lupus Erythematosus and Related Syndromes: Eighth Edition

    • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

      2010, Current Clinical Medicine: Expert Consult Premium Edition - Enhanced Online Features and Print

    • Inflammatory Disorders of the Esophagus

      2009, Surgical Pathology of the GI Tract, Liver, Biliary Tract and Pancreas

    • Inflammatory Disorders of the Esophagus

      2008, Surgical Pathology of the GI Tract, Liver, Biliary Tract and Pancreas: Expert Consult - Online and Print

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      We assessed whether a serum soluble receptor for advanced glycation end product (sRAGE) levels were associated with a progression of carotid atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness indexes in a cohort of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients.

      RA patients with symptoms onset <2 years were recruited. Vascular assessments and serum sRAGE levels were measured at baseline and 1 year later. Arterial stiffness was determined by pulse wave velocity and aortic augmentation index (AIx). Carotid intima-media thickness was measured using high-resolution ultrasound.

      Ninety-four patients completed the 1-year study. Fifty-three (56.4%) achieved disease remission [28-joint disease activity score (DAS28 < 2.6)] at 12 months. Improvement in arterial stiffness was observed as reflected by the significant reductions in AIx and pulse wave velocity. At 12 months, the sRAGE levels increased significantly compared with baseline (939.8 ± 517.7 pg/ml to 1272.1 ± 567.3 pg/ml, P < 0.001). Changes in sRAGE levels were significantly higher in men compared to women (768 ± 510 pg/ml versus 271 ± 490 pg/ml, P < 0.05) and was negatively associated with the change in AIx (r = −0.259, P = 0.023). Changes in sRAGE level were not associated with other demographic, clinical, cardiovascular risk factors or treatment. Using multivariate analysis, the change in sRAGE levels and baseline high-density lipoprotein were independent predictors associated with the change in AIx.

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    Copyright © 1997 Published by Elsevier Inc.

    (Video) Cutaneous Manifestations of Rheumatic Diseases

    FAQs

    Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your esophagus? ›

    Among the range of symptoms that may affect patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal motility disorders are common.

    What are the signs of rheumatic diseases? ›

    What are the symptoms of arthritis and other rheumatic diseases?
    • Joint pain.
    • Swelling in a joint or joints.
    • Joint stiffness that lasts for at least 1 hour in the early morning.
    • Chronic pain or tenderness in a joint or joints.
    • Warmth and redness in the joint area.
    • Limited movement in the affected joint or joints.

    What is the most common form of rheumatic disease? ›

    Among the most common ones are:
    • Lupus.
    • Spondyloarthropathies -- ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA)
    • Sjogren's syndrome.
    • Gout.
    • Scleroderma.
    • Infectious arthritis.
    • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
    • Polymyalgia rheumatica.

    What are examples of rheumatic diseases? ›

    Types of Rheumatic Disease
    • Ankylosing Spondylitis. A chronic, or long-lasting, disease that primarily affects the spine and may lead to stiffness of the back. ...
    • Bursitis. ...
    • Crohn's Disease. ...
    • Gout. ...
    • Infectious Arthritis. ...
    • Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. ...
    • Osteoarthritis. ...
    • Osteoporosis.

    What is RA esophagus? ›

    RA is associated with dysphagia, which is often seen in severe disease. Symptoms can be attributed to xerostomia, however, RA can also directly affect the esophagus and LES through rheumatoid vasculitis. Rheumatoid vasculitis is an extra-articular manifestation of RA that can affect the gastrointestinal tract.

    How does rheumatoid arthritis affect the throat? ›

    Cricoarytenoid arthritis (CA) is a typical feature of rheumatoid synovitis. The symptoms include hoarseness, a sense of pharyngeal fullness in the throat when speaking and swallowing, pain in the ears and dyspnoea. Infection of the upper respiratory tract may occur and tracheostomy may be required [6–8].

    What is the main cause of rheumatism? ›

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition, which means it's caused by the immune system attacking healthy body tissue. However, it's not yet known what triggers this. Your immune system normally makes antibodies that attack bacteria and viruses, helping to fight infection.

    How is rheumatic disease diagnosed? ›

    Imaging tests of your joints and bones can help detect inflammation, fluid buildup, cartilage loss, soft tissue tears, and bone or joint erosion and damage. Your doctor may ask to have you undergo X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, or ultrasounds.

    What does rheumatic disease mean? ›

    Rheumatic diseases are autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that cause your immune system to attack your joints, muscles, bones and organs. Rheumatic diseases are often grouped under the term “arthritis” — which is used to describe over 100 diseases and conditions.

    What is another word for rheumatism? ›

    “Rheumatism” is not a medical term, but many people use it informally to describe symptoms similar to those of arthritis. People often use the terms rheumatism and arthritis to describe a variety of symptoms, such as joint pain and inflammation.

    What are the 4 stages of rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    The four stages of rheumatoid arthritis are known as synovitis, pannus, fibrous ankylosis, and bony ankylosis.
    • Stage I: Synovitis. During stage I, you may start having mild symptoms, including joint pain and joint stiffness. ...
    • Stage II: Pannus. ...
    • Stage III: Fibrous Ankylosis. ...
    • Stage IV: Bony Ankylosis.
    Oct 12, 2021

    What is difference between arthritis and rheumatism? ›

    Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, involves the wearing away of the cartilage that caps the bones in your joints. Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease in which the immune system attacks the joints, beginning with the lining of joints.

    What tests are done in rheumatology? ›

    What Are the Tests for Rheumatoid Arthritis?
    • Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) antibodies. They signal bone damage caused by RA.
    • C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels go up when you have inflammation.
    • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate). ...
    • Rheumatoid factor. ...
    • Synovial fluid.
    Jun 6, 2022

    What is the treatment for rheumatism? ›

    Conventional DMARDs .

    These drugs can slow the progression of rheumatoid arthritis and save the joints and other tissues from permanent damage. Common DMARDs include methotrexate (Trexall, Otrexup, others), leflunomide (Arava), hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) and sulfasalazine (Azulfidine).

    How do you treat an esophageal ulcer? ›

    Treatment of esophageal ulcers

    Treatment for most ulcers uses proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), an acid-blocking medication. If you are diagnosed with an esophageal ulcer on endoscopy, you may need long-term treatment with PPI medication. If the ulcer is bleeding, a provider can treat the bleeding during an endoscopy.

    Can RA cause acid reflux? ›

    Stomach Pain or Indigestion

    RA and medicines used to treat it are linked to mouth and stomach ulcers, stomach bleeding, acid reflux, diarrhea, and constipation. Painful diverticulitis (inflamed pouches in your GI tract) and colitis (an inflamed colon) are also possible if you have RA.

    Does esophagitis cause difficulty swallowing? ›

    Esophagitis can cause painful, difficult swallowing and chest pain. Causes of esophagitis include stomach acids backing up into the esophagus, infection, oral medications and allergies.

    What does arthritis in throat feel like? ›

    Yes, arthritis can affect the cricoarytenoid joints in the throat. Symptoms include hoarseness, painful swallowing, feeling like something is stuck in your throat, shortness of breath, and loud breathing.

    What autoimmune disease causes throat pain? ›

    Rheumatic fever is a complex disease that affects the joints, skin, heart, blood vessels, and brain. It occurs mainly in children between the ages of 5 to 15. It is an autoimmune disease that may occur after an infection with strep (streptococcus) bacteria. Strep infections include strep throat and scarlet fever.

    Can arthritis in neck cause throat problems? ›

    According to our clinical observations, degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic musculoskeletal dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints are disorders that can cause swallowing difficulties.

    What is the blood test for rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    An anti-CCP antibody test — also called an ACCP test or CCP-test — looks for the presence of these antibodies to help confirm rheumatoid arthritis. An anti-CCP test can also help doctors determine the severity of a rheumatoid arthritis case.

    What are the five signs of rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    Five signs of rheumatoid arthritis
    • Stiffness. Waking up refreshed in the morning is the best way to start the day. ...
    • Chronic fatigue. If you've noticed joint stiffness with a decrease in energy, it may be time to give us a call. ...
    • Joint swelling. ...
    • Numbness and tingling. ...
    • Fever.

    Can stress cause rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint condition and an autoimmune disease that can be caused by stress, according to research. Stress triggers rheumatoid arthritis by setting off the immune system's inflammatory response in which cytokines are released.

    Is rheumatic disease curable? ›

    Unfortunately, there is no cure for rheumatic disease (with the exception of infectious arthritis, which can be cured with antibiotics if detected or diagnosed early). The goal of treatment is to limit pain and inflammation, while ensuring optimal joint function.

    Is rheumatic heart disease? ›

    Key points. Rheumatic heart disease is a condition in which the heart valves have been permanently damaged by rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that can affect many connective tissues, especially in the heart. Untreated or under-treated strep infections put a person at increased risk.

    Which bacteria causes rheumatic fever? ›

    Bacteria called group A Streptococcus (group A strep) cause these infections. It usually takes about 1 to 5 weeks after strep throat or scarlet fever for rheumatic fever to develop. Rheumatic fever is thought to be caused by a response of the body's defense system — the immune system.

    What is the number 1 vegetable to avoid? ›

    Strawberries top the list, followed by spinach. (The full 2019 Dirty Dozen list, ranked from most contaminated to least, include strawberries, spinach, kale, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, cherries, pears, tomatoes, celery and potatoes.)

    Is banana good for rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    Bananas: This humble fruit can be very helpful for those dealing with arthritis. A banana is a powerhouse of potassium that plays an important role in reducing sodium retention and the calcification process of bones which accelerate bone loss. Bananas can help alleviate cartilage damage of the joints.

    Is banana good for arthritis? ›

    Bananas and Plantains are high in magnesium and potassium that can increase bone density. Magnesium may also alleviate arthritis symptoms.

    Can rheumatic fever cause rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    A separate disease from RA is rheumatic fever. This acute condition can occur after an infection with strep throat or scarlet fever. It involves a widespread inflammatory response, joint pain, and other symptoms. The symptoms can be similar, but the two diseases are not related.

    Does rheumatoid arthritis cause death? ›

    A person cannot die from RA. However, the widespread inflammation that characterizes the condition can lead to life-threatening complications. According to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Support Network, a person with RA may have a lifespan that is approximately 10, or at most 15, years shorter than average.

    How long can you live with rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    Even though there's no way to predict the progression of rheumatoid arthritis, treatments have improved over the years. This allows many diagnosed with the condition to live long, healthy lives into their 80s or 90s, with less complications of the disease.

    What is the final stage of rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    In end stage RA, inflammation stops, but the damage continues. The joint might stop working. You'll still have pain, swelling, stiffness, and lack of motion. Your muscles may be weak, too.

    What is the most painful type of arthritis? ›

    Rheumatoid arthritis can be one of the most painful types of arthritis; it affects joints as well as other surrounding tissues, including organs. This inflammatory, autoimmune disease attacks healthy cells by mistake, causing painful swelling in the joints, like hands, wrists and knees.

    How do you know if you have rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis? ›

    Osteoarthritis tends to develop gradually over several years, as the joint cartilage wears away. Eventually the bones of your joints rub against each other. In contrast, the pain and stiffness of rheumatoid arthritis can develop and worsen over several weeks or a few months.

    What doctor treats autoimmune disorders? ›

    Rheumatologists specialize in diagnosing and treating musculoskeletal diseases and autoimmune conditions (rheumatic disease). Orbai talks about how to recognize common autoimmune disease symptoms and when you should see a doctor.

    What autoimmune disease does a rheumatologist treat? ›

    Mayo Clinic rheumatologists have expertise in the treatment of inflammatory diseases of blood vessels (vasculitis) and systemic autoimmune connective tissue diseases (for examples, lupus, scleroderma).

    What doctor treats chronic inflammation? ›

    A rheumatologist is a doctor with specialized training in inflammatory (rheumatic) disease. It's common to think of rheumatologists when it comes to arthritis. But they treat many other conditions, including tendon issues, muscle injuries and rare, inherited disorders.

    What vitamin deficiency causes arthritis? ›

    Reduced vitamin D intake has been linked to increased susceptibility to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with disease activity in patients with RA.

    What is the best painkiller for rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    NSAIDs. Most people with RA are advised to take a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug to decrease pain and inflammation. NSAIDs are sold over-the-counter, under such names as Advil and Aleve, as well as by prescription, under names such as Mobic and Celebrex.

    Is Vitamin D good for arthritis? ›

    Vitamin D is critical for overall health. For one, it helps with calcium absorption, which in turn helps the body develop and maintain healthy bones. It also reduces inflammation and plays a role in regulating the immune system, so the body is better able to ward off sickness and disease, including arthritis.

    Can rheumatoid arthritis make it difficult to swallow? ›

    Besides pain in their joints and other tissues, rheumatoid arthritis patients can also have a difficult time swallowing.

    Can rheumatoid arthritis cause acid reflux? ›

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common in patients with many chronic diseases, but has not been well recognized in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    Can RA affect acid reflux? ›

    Stomach Pain or Indigestion

    RA and medicines used to treat it are linked to mouth and stomach ulcers, stomach bleeding, acid reflux, diarrhea, and constipation. Painful diverticulitis (inflamed pouches in your GI tract) and colitis (an inflamed colon) are also possible if you have RA.

    Can rheumatoid arthritis cause digestive problems? ›

    Studies show that people with RA are more likely to have stomach problems than the general population. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract has an upper and lower section. And RA can affect either one. Research shows that people with RA are about 70% more likely to develop a gastrointestinal problem than people without RA.

    What autoimmune causes dysphagia? ›

    Autoimmune causes of dysphagia can be gastroenterological, such as IgG4-related disease and eosinophilic esophagitis; dermatological, such as pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid; rheumatologic, such as scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Behcet disease, ANCA- ...

    Does arthritis cause throat problems? ›

    Can arthritis affect the throat? Yes, arthritis can affect the cricoarytenoid joints in the throat. Symptoms include hoarseness, painful swallowing, feeling like something is stuck in your throat, shortness of breath, and loud breathing.

    Can arthritis in neck affect swallowing? ›

    According to our clinical observations, degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints are disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties.

    What are the worst symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    Signs and symptoms of RA include:
    • Pain or aching in more than one joint.
    • Stiffness in more than one joint.
    • Tenderness and swelling in more than one joint.
    • The same symptoms on both sides of the body (such as in both hands or both knees)
    • Weight loss.
    • Fever.
    • Fatigue or tiredness.
    • Weakness.

    What are the five signs of rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    Five signs of rheumatoid arthritis
    • Stiffness. Waking up refreshed in the morning is the best way to start the day. ...
    • Chronic fatigue. If you've noticed joint stiffness with a decrease in energy, it may be time to give us a call. ...
    • Joint swelling. ...
    • Numbness and tingling. ...
    • Fever.

    Can rheumatoid arthritis cause throat pain? ›

    Much more rarely, RA can attack joints in the larynx, or voice box, and cause hoarseness, pain during swallowing or talking, a feeling of having something stuck in your throat, lowering of the voice or shortness of breath.

    What can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    Conditions That Can Look Like RA
    • Lyme Disease.
    • Psoriatic Arthritis.
    • Sjögren's Syndrome.
    • Gout.
    • Fibromyalgia.
    • Lupus.
    Sep 24, 2020

    What organs can rheumatoid arthritis affect? ›

    In rheumatoid arthritis, your immune system attacks healthy tissue in your joints. It can also cause medical problems with your heart, lungs, nerves, eyes and skin.

    What is the blood test for rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    An anti-CCP antibody test — also called an ACCP test or CCP-test — looks for the presence of these antibodies to help confirm rheumatoid arthritis. An anti-CCP test can also help doctors determine the severity of a rheumatoid arthritis case.

    What is end stage rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    End-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an advanced stage of disease in which there is severe joint damage and destruction in the absence of ongoing inflammation.

    What are the 4 stages of rheumatoid arthritis? ›

    The four stages of rheumatoid arthritis are known as synovitis, pannus, fibrous ankylosis, and bony ankylosis.
    • Stage I: Synovitis. During stage I, you may start having mild symptoms, including joint pain and joint stiffness. ...
    • Stage II: Pannus. ...
    • Stage III: Fibrous Ankylosis. ...
    • Stage IV: Bony Ankylosis.
    Oct 12, 2021

    Why does rheumatoid arthritis cause loss of appetite? ›

    In people with RA, the body's defenders (white blood cells and antibodies) attack connective tissue lining the joints. The inflammation and joint pain common in RA can contribute to a decreased appetite — as can other RA complications.

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