MSSA vs. MRSA: What Is the Difference? - Nozin (2023)

MSSA vs. MRSA: What Is the Difference? - Nozin (1)

One of the first known “superbugs,” MRSA has been making headlines since the 1960s. Today, as the list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria grows, MRSA is still a major concern for healthcare providers and communities alike.

MRSA’s infamous reputation shouldn’t give the impression that MSSA is a kinder, gentler strain of staph infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns, “MRSA is well known but any staph can be deadly.”

When it comes to MSSA vs MRSA, the two are more alike than different. They have the same symptoms, cause similar problems, and cost roughly the same amount to treat. There are however, some key differences, including how (and where) the two bacteria tend to spread and how difficult they are to treat.

MSSA vs MRSA: How Are They Different?

MSSA and MRSA are two types of Staphylococcus aureus (or staph), a bacteria that many people carry on their skin and in their noses. Most people don’t even know it’s there, because the bacteria doesn’t make them sick unless a wound, surgery, or IV needle stick gives it an entrance into the body. Then it can cause infections ranging from minor skin conditions to life-threatening sepsis. Infected and “colonized” people can also transmit staph to others. When someone is colonized, S aureus bacteria is living on the individual’s skin.

The defining difference between MRSA and MSSA lies in how they respond to methicillin — an antibiotic that was introduced in 1959 to treat staph infections. Some S. aureus strains had already developed a resistance to penicillin, and by 1961, British scientists discovered strains that resisted methicillin as well. These are called methicillin-resistant staph (MRSA), as opposed to methicillin-susceptible staph (MSSA).

(Video) Brandl's Basics: Treatment of MRSA and MSSA

In terms of global health, MRSA is a more serious problem than MSSA because of its ability to evolve. There are even a few strains that can resist vancomycin, one of the last remaining antibiotics for MRSA. That’s why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lists MRSA as one of the top “Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States.”

For individuals, however, both MRSA and MSSA can cause life-threatening staph infections.

Prevalence of MSSA vs MRSA Infection

One in three people (33%) carry staph in their noses, and two percent are colonized with MRSA, according to the CDC. These people are colonized, but most of them rarely become infected. If the staph bacteria gets below the skin’s surface, it can cause painful skin infections, but the real danger is when staph enters the bloodstream. More than 119,000 people were diagnosed with bloodstream staph infections in 2017, and nearly 20,000 of them died as a result.

Some MRSA strains are more dangerous than others, but according to the World Health Organization (WHO), MRSA is generally not more virulent than MSSA. However, because MRSA is more likely than MSSA to be associated with bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream), MRSA has the higher mortality rate. The CDC estimates that 80,461 people experience MRSA infections each year, and 11,285 of them die.

MRSA is the most common cause of hospital-acquired bacteremia, but MSSA can also be deadly in healthcare settings, especially for infants. In a study of 348 neonatal intensive care units across the country, researchers from Duke University found that 72.1 percent of staph infections in hospitalized infants were caused by MSSA. Infants with serious MSSA infections were also more likely to die before discharge than infants with MRSA infections.

The good news is that better screening and prevention protocols have helped U.S. hospitals dramatically decrease staph infection rates since earlier this century. Between 2005 and 2012, MRSA bloodstream infections associated with healthcare facilities decreased by 17 percent per year, according to the CDC.

(Video) What is the Difference Between Staph and MRSA?

The bad news is that hospitals’ MRSA progress has stagnated, with little improvement since 2013. Meanwhile, MSSA is on the rise in communities, likely due in part to the opioid crisis. In 2016, nine percent of people with serious staph infections injected drugs — up from four percent in 2011.

Risk Factors for MSSA Infections vs MRSA

Overall, MRSA tends to be associated with hospital-acquired infections, while MSSA tends to be associated with community-acquired infections, but both types of staph are common inside and outside of hospitals.

Hospital patients are more likely than the average person to be colonized with MRSA. While two percent of the general population is colonized with MRSA, approximately five percent of U.S. hospitals patients carry MRSA in their nose or on their skin, according to CDC estimates.

Not only are hospital patients more likely to be exposed to staph, they are often more vulnerable to infection because they have a deep wound, surgical site, or medical device (e.g., IV, pacemaker, or ventilator) inserted in the body. Hospital patients are also more likely to have a chronic disease that puts them at greater risk for infection — such as diabetes, cancer, HIV, heart or vascular disease, or lung disease.

In hospitals, staph can be transmitted by colonized people in close quarters and contaminated surfaces, including healthcare workers’ hands. However, autoinfection is often the greatest threat. DNA tests of MRSA-infected wounds reveal that 80 percent contain bacteria from the person’s own nasal passages.

Outside of hospitals (i.e., in the community), risk factors for staph infection include uncovered or draining wounds, contact sports, crowded living situations (including nursing homes or prisons), sharing personal items such as razors or towels, and injected drug use.

(Video) Staphylococci - MSSA vs. MRSA

MRSA vs MSSA Infection: How to Tell the Difference

Wherever or however it’s transmitted, staph bacteria (MSSA or MRSA) can cause a wide range of infections, including:

    • Skin infections: boils, cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis
    • Pneumonia
    • Bacteremia/endocarditis
    • Meningitis
    • Osteomyelitis
    • Septic arthritis
    • Pyomyositis
    • Medical device infections
    • Surgical site infections

Staph infection symptoms vary depending on the part of the body that is affected. Blood tests are required to diagnose staph infection and determine whether it’s MSSA vs MRSA, or another type of bacteria altogether.

Staph infection on the skin usually appears as a painful bump or red, swollen area that’s warm to the touch, pus-filled, and often accompanied by fever.

Cost of Treatment: MSSA vs MRSA

For hospital patients with staph infection, the costs can be steep, depending on the severity and location of the infection. On average, the length of stay and price of treatment associated with MRSA are twice as high as other hospital stays, according to the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project.

Historically, MRSA has been more costly to treat than MSSA, but according to a large 2019 study, that’s no longer the case. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University, the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy, and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center found that MSSA is just as expensive to treat and often more expensive. For example, in 2014, the estimated cost for MSSA-related pneumonia was $40,725, versus $38,561 for MRSA-related pneumonia. For other hospitalizations related to staph, the average price tag was $15,578 for MSSA and $14,792 for MRSA.

Prevention Strategies: MSSA vs MRSA

Healthcare providers have made great strides at reducing the risks of MRSA, but most hospitals still have work to do. With MSSA infection rates on the rise in communities, hospitals will likely be treating more infected or colonized patients, who could transmit the bacteria to other patients during a time when they’re already at high risk for infection. This underscores the need for healthcare providers to remain vigilant about both staph prevention and patient education.

(Video) MRSA | Methicillin Resistant | Staphylococcus aureus | Antibiotic Resistance | Basic Science Series

To help reduce the spread of staph in communities, doctors should talk to their patients about effective infection prevention strategies, especially after surgery and before hospital discharge. According to the CDC, these tactics include:

  • proper and frequent handwashing
  • keeping wounds clean and covered
  • not sharing items that touch or pierce skin, such as towels, razors, or needles

The CDC also advises healthcare organizations to continue making staph prevention a top priority by “implementing CDC recommendations, including the use of Contact Precautions (gloves and gowns), continually reviewing their facility infection data available from CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), and considering other interventions … such as screening patients at high risk, or decolonization [during] high risk periods.”

Decolonization involves the use of CHG bathing or skin wipes, and a nasal antibiotic (e.g., mupirocin) or antiseptic (e.g., Nozin® Nasal Sanitizer® antiseptic). Unlike nasal antibiotic ointments, antiseptics don’t run the risk of becoming staph-resistant. Furthermore, antiseptics are effective almost immediately as opposed to antibiotics taking up to 5 days for nasal decolonization.

Other healthcare research organizations agree with the CDC’s recommendation to decolonize high-risk patients. Both the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and Health Research and Educational Trust have published similar guidelines. However, recent research suggests decolonization could play an even greater role in reducing MRSA and MSSA infections, especially in intensive care units where patients are most vulnerable. For instance, in a study of 43 hospitals and 74 ICUs, researchers from the University of California Irvine discovered that universal decolonization was more effective at preventing MRSA infections than targeted decolonization or using contact precautions for known staph carriers.


With MSSA on the rise and antibiotic resistance becoming an increasingly serious threat worldwide, the CDC, WHO, and other global health organizations continue to study further prevention methods and treatment strategies. Additionally, it is of critical importance for healthcare providers to stay up to date on staph infection best practices, and to keep personnel and patients educated about their role in preventing the spread of MRSA and MSSA.

If you would like to learn how Nozin infection prevention programs help mitigate MRSA and MSSA colonization risks, improve care and lower costs request a consultation with one of our advisors today!

(Video) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

FAQs

How can you tell the difference between MSSA and MRSA? ›

Those that are sensitive to meticillin are termed meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). MRSA and MSSA only differ in their degree of antibiotic resistance: other than that there is no real difference between them. Having MSSA on your skin doesn't cause any symptoms and doesn't make you ill.

What is the best antibiotic for MSSA? ›

A beta-lactam (i.e., nafcillin) is the drug of choice for patients with MSSA not allergic to penicillin; vancomycin is preferred for MRSA catheter-associated infections.

What is first line agent in patients with MSSA? ›

Agents used for treatment of MSSA include penicillinase-resistant semisynthetic penicillins, first-generation cephalosporins, vancomycin and daptomycin. A beta-lactam is the preferred drug of choice for MSSA bacteremia. Anti-staphylococcal penicillins such as nafcillin are often utilized as first line agents.

What are the major differences between staph and MRSA? ›

MRSA is a type of staph infection that is resistant to certain antibiotics. The main difference is that an MRSA infection may require different types of antibiotics. MRSA and staph infections have similar symptoms, causes, risk factors, and treatments.

How do you know if it is MSSA? ›

Some possible signs of an MSSA infection include: Skin infections. Staph infections that affect the skin may cause symptoms such as impetigo, abscesses, cellulitis, pus bumps, and boils. Fever.

What drugs are MSSA and MRSA resistant to? ›

Antibiotic resistance pattern of S. aureus. The antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns of MRSA and MSSA isolates against antimicrobial agents are summarized in Table 4. More than 25% of MRSA isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, erythromycin, clindamycin, azithromycin and tetracycline.

How do I get rid of MSSA? ›

Most MSSA infections can be treated by washing the skin with an antibacterial cleanser, using warm soaks, applying an antibiotic ointment prescribed by a doctor, and covering the skin with a clean dressing. Doctors also may prescribe oral antibiotics to treat MSSA infections.

How do you get MSSA in your nose? ›

aureus bacteria, including MSSA, are spread very easily. Since the bacteria colonize inside the nostrils, when someone who is a carrier of the bacteria touches their nose and then touches something else, the bacteria will transfer.

Can MSSA be cured? ›

MSSA infections are usually treatable with antibiotics.

Does MSSA need contact precautions? ›

To prevent MRSA infections, healthcare personnel: Clean their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer before and after caring for every patient. Carefully clean hospital rooms and medical equipment. Use Contact Precautions when caring for patients with MRSA (colonized, or carrying, and infected).

Does clindamycin cover MSSA? ›

aureus (MSSA) infections, but first generation cephalosporins (cefazolin, cephalothin and cephalexin), clindamycin, lincomycin and erythromycin have important therapeutic roles in less serious MSSA infections such as skin and soft tissue infections or in patients with penicillin hypersensitivity, although ...

Which antibiotics were most effective against S. aureus against MRSA? ›

The most effective antibiotics for MRSA eradication are vancomycin, linezolid, and a few others in combination with vancomycin (Figure 2).

Is MSSA Gram positive or negative? ›

Staphylococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacteria that cause a wide variety of clinical diseases. Infections caused by this pathogen are common both in community-acquired and hospital-acquired settings.

How long is MSSA contagious? ›

Incubation Period Variable. Typically 4–10 days Contagious Period As long as the bacteria are present in nose, throat and mouth secretions. Do not squeeze or “pop” boils or pimples. Cover with a clean, dry bandage and refer to a health care provider for diagnosis and treatment.

How long does MSSA live on surfaces? ›

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can survive on some surfaces, like towels, razors, furniture, and athletic equipment for hours, days, or even weeks. It can spread to people who touch a contaminated surface, and MRSA can cause infections if it gets into a cut, scrape, or open wound.

Is MSSA life threatening? ›

MRSA is well known but any staph can be deadly.

Staph is a leading cause of infections in US healthcare facilities.

Is MSSA contagious? ›

Staph infection is quite contagious, including both methicillin-resistant staph (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible staph (MSSA). You can get staph from breathing in infected breath droplets, touching contaminated surfaces including an infected person's skin, or getting the bacteria in a cut.

How common is MSSA? ›

Meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA) is a type of bacteria which lives harmlessly on the skin and in the nose, in approximately 30% of the population. People who have MSSA on their skin or in their nose are said to be colonised.

Is MSSA more common than MRSA? ›

Abstract. Numerous clinical studies have indicated, based on mortality rates, that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are more virulent than methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains.

What are the first signs of MRSA? ›

MRSA infections start out as small red bumps that can quickly turn into deep, painful abscesses. Staph skin infections, including MRSA , generally start as swollen, painful red bumps that might look like pimples or spider bites.

What is a MRSA MSSA test? ›

The MSSA/MRSA nasal culture will check for the presence of staphylococcal bacteria. Staphylococcal. bacteria can be present on the skin and in the nose of healthy individuals without symptoms (known as. colonization). A positive nasal screen does not mean you are infected nor will your surgery be.

What is worse than MRSA? ›

Considered more dangerous than MRSA, Dr. Frieden called CRE a “Nightmare Bacteria” because of its high mortality rate, it's resistance to nearly all antibiotics, and its ability to spread its drug resistance to other bacteria.

How long do you treat MSSA bacteremia? ›

Patients with S. aureus bacteremia should be treated with at least 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy. According to consensus guidelines, patients with uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia (Box 1) may be treated with 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy.

How long does it take to recover from MSSA? ›

Most people recover within 2 weeks, but it may take longer if the symptoms are severe. A doctor may prescribe a low-dose oral antibiotic for a person to take long term to help prevent a reoccurrence.

How do I stop being a staph carrier? ›

Preventing the Spread of MRSA
  1. Clean your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  2. Take a bath or shower often, be sure to use soap to clean your body while showering or bathing.
  3. Wash your sheets and towels at least once a week.
  4. Change your clothes daily and wash them before wearing again.

Why do I keep getting staph infections in my nose? ›

A staph infection in the nose can occur as a result of a scratch, sore, or other types of damage to the skin of the nose. Some potential causes of a nasal staph infection include: nose picking. excessively blowing or rubbing the nose.

Is MSSA contagious after antibiotics? ›

Most staph infections can be cured with antibiotics, and infections are no longer contagious about 24 to 48 hours after appropriate antibiotic treatment has started.

Which is considered the most serious staphylococcal skin infection? ›

If left untreated, staph infections can be deadly. Rarely, staph germs are resistant to the antibiotics commonly used to treat them. This infection, called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), causes severe infection and death.

Does doxycycline treat MSSA? ›

Doxycycline was the least inhibitory of the antibiotics tested against both MRSA and MSSA, displaying no bactericidal activity in any of the cases and showing regrowth after 24 h of incubation at MIC level. Conclusion: Vancomycin at high concentrations showed the best activity.

Does MSSA return? ›

MRSA and MSSA are types of staph infections that are hard to treat. They can lead to serious infections or even death. These infections can come back or spread to other people.

Do you have MRSA for life? ›

Will I always have MRSA? Maybe. Many people who have active infections are treated and no longer have MRSA. However, sometimes MRSA goes away after treatment and comes back several times.

Can staph infection affect the brain? ›

Staphylococcal brain infections may cause mental deterioration and epileptic seizures, suggesting interference with normal neurotransmission in the brain.

Does Bactrim cover MSSA? ›

Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Bactrim DS, Sulfatrim Pediatric) Inhibits bacterial growth by inhibiting synthesis of dihydrofolic acid. Active against most staphylococci (MSSA), including some strains resistant to methicillin (MRSA).

Does amoxicillin cover MSSA? ›

Penicillin resistance (MSSA) is conferred by penicillinase production, which can be overcome by the addition of a beta-lactamase inhibitor (e.g., amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam) or use of penicillinase-resistant penicillins (e.g., oxacillin, nafcillin).

Does Cipro cover MSSA? ›

Abstract. The fluoroquinolones, particularly ciprofloxacin, have been suggested to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and colonization and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infections.

Why is MRSA so hard to treat with antibiotics? ›

MRSA is a type of bacteria that's resistant to several widely used antibiotics. This means infections with MRSA can be harder to treat than other bacterial infections.

How many antibiotics is S. aureus resistant to? ›

Multi-drug resistance pattern of the S.

aureus isolates, nine (19%) were multi-drug resistant (resistant to three or more antibiotics), 11 (23%) were resistant to only two antibiotics, 23 (49%) were resistant to only one antibiotic and the remaining four (9%) showed no resistance to any of the antibiotics.

Why is vancomycin first line for MRSA? ›

That first-line treatment, the antibiotic vancomycin, can keep MRSA from spreading in some cases by preventing the construction of new bacterial cell walls, thus preventing the bacteria from reproducing. But vancomycin is largely useless against two of the bacteria's key defenses.

What is the difference between MSSA and MRSA? ›

Those that are sensitive to meticillin are termed meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). MRSA and MSSA only differ in their degree of antibiotic resistance: other than that there is no real difference between them. Having MSSA on your skin doesn't cause any symptoms and doesn't make you ill.

Is MSSA multidrug resistant? ›

Methods: Facilities may choose to monitor one or more of the following MDROs: Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp.

Does Augmentin cover MSSA? ›

Thus, amoxycillin/clavulanate appears to be a good candidate for empirical treatment of severe infections that may be caused by MSSA. Usage of amoxycillin/clavulanate against MRSA is, however, still experimental and is not currently advocated for the treatment of MRSA infections in humans.

What antibiotics treat MSSA? ›

aureus (MSSA) preferably are treated with a semi-synthetic penicillin (e.g., intravenous nafcillin, oxacillin [Bactocill], oral dicloxacillin [Dynapen]) in patients not allergic to penicillin. First-generation cephalosporins (e.g., oral cephalexin [Keflex], intravenous cefazolin [Ancef]) are an alternative.

What is the strongest antibiotic for staph infection? ›

For serious staph infections, vancomycin may be required. This is because so many strains of staph bacteria have become resistant to other traditional antibiotics.

How long can staph live on bedding? ›

Symptoms of a Staph infection include redness, warmth, swelling, tenderness of the skin, and boils or blisters. How do Staph skin infections spread? Staph/MRSA lives on the skin and survives on objects for 24 hours or more.

What detergent kills MRSA? ›

Lysol® kills 99.9% of viruses & bacteria, including MRSA!

Why is it important to differentiate MRSA and MSSA? ›

Some MRSA strains are more dangerous than others, but according to the World Health Organization (WHO), MRSA is generally not more virulent than MSSA. However, because MRSA is more likely than MSSA to be associated with bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream), MRSA has the higher mortality rate.

What soap is good for staph infection? ›

Eliminating Staph From Your Skin
  • Buy Hibiclens or chlorhexidine wash (an antibacterial soap similar to what surgeons scrub with): • Find it in the “first aid” section of the pharmacy. ...
  • Buy Triple Antibiotic ointment (or use the prescription cream that Dr. Minars gave you): ...
  • WHY YOU DO IT:

Why is it important to differentiate MRSA and MSSA? ›

Some MRSA strains are more dangerous than others, but according to the World Health Organization (WHO), MRSA is generally not more virulent than MSSA. However, because MRSA is more likely than MSSA to be associated with bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream), MRSA has the higher mortality rate.

Can MSSA turn to MRSA? ›

About 2000 patients (2.2%) subsequently developed S. aureus infections; 30% were MRSA carriers, 26% were MSSA carriers, and 44% were uncolonized patients. About half of the infections were due to MRSA; 54% of these occurred in MRSA carriers, 4% in MSSA carriers, and 42% in uncolonized patients.

How do you know if its MRSA? ›

MRSA and other staph skin infections often appear as a bump or infected area on the skin that may be: > Red > Swollen or painful > Warm to the touch > Full of pus or other drainage It is especially important to contact your healthcare professional when MRSA skin infection signs and symptoms are accompanied by a fever.

Is MSSA gram positive? ›

Staphylococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacteria that cause a wide variety of clinical diseases. Infections caused by this pathogen are common both in community-acquired and hospital-acquired settings.

Does MSSA require contact precautions? ›

To prevent MRSA infections, healthcare personnel: Clean their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer before and after caring for every patient. Carefully clean hospital rooms and medical equipment. Use Contact Precautions when caring for patients with MRSA (colonized, or carrying, and infected).

How do you catch MSSA? ›

MSSA can be transferred from person to person via touch. This is the most common mode of spread. It can also be spread via some of the equipment used to care for you during your stay. In hospital as there are many patients in close proximity to one another therefore making the spread of MSSA easier.

How do you get MSSA in your nose? ›

aureus bacteria, including MSSA, are spread very easily. Since the bacteria colonize inside the nostrils, when someone who is a carrier of the bacteria touches their nose and then touches something else, the bacteria will transfer.

Is MSSA life threatening? ›

MSSA Bacteremia occurs when the MSSA bacteria enter your bloodstream. This is a serious infection that has a high risk of complications and death. Once it's in the bloodstream, the infection often spreads to other organs and tissues within the body such as the heart, lungs, or brain.

How long is MSSA contagious? ›

Incubation Period Variable. Typically 4–10 days Contagious Period As long as the bacteria are present in nose, throat and mouth secretions. Do not squeeze or “pop” boils or pimples. Cover with a clean, dry bandage and refer to a health care provider for diagnosis and treatment.

How long does MSSA live on surfaces? ›

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can survive on some surfaces, like towels, razors, furniture, and athletic equipment for hours, days, or even weeks. It can spread to people who touch a contaminated surface, and MRSA can cause infections if it gets into a cut, scrape, or open wound.

What are 3 symptoms of MRSA? ›

aureus skin infections, including MRSA, appear as a bump or infected area on the skin that might be:
  • red.
  • swollen.
  • painful.
  • warm to the touch.
  • full of pus or other drainage.
  • accompanied by a fever.

What can be mistaken for MRSA? ›

Impetigo, a skin infection most commonly seen in children, is usually confined to the upper levels of skin. It can looks very similar to MRSA in some cases, with sores and redness. Impetigo is highly contagious, so you should see a doctor if you suspect either of these conditions.

How do I stop being a staph carrier? ›

Preventing the Spread of MRSA
  1. Clean your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  2. Take a bath or shower often, be sure to use soap to clean your body while showering or bathing.
  3. Wash your sheets and towels at least once a week.
  4. Change your clothes daily and wash them before wearing again.

Can MSSA cause sepsis? ›

Staph can cause serious infections if it gets into the blood and can lead to sepsis or death. Staph is either methicillin-resistant staph (MRSA) or methicillin-susceptible staph (MSSA). Staph can spread in and between hospitals and other healthcare facilities, and in communities.

How long do you treat MSSA bacteremia? ›

Patients with S. aureus bacteremia should be treated with at least 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy. According to consensus guidelines, patients with uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia (Box 1) may be treated with 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy.

Does amoxicillin cover MSSA? ›

Penicillin resistance (MSSA) is conferred by penicillinase production, which can be overcome by the addition of a beta-lactamase inhibitor (e.g., amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam) or use of penicillinase-resistant penicillins (e.g., oxacillin, nafcillin).

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