Neutrophilic dermatoses (2022)

Table of Contents
Clinics in Dermatology Abstract Introduction Section snippets Acute febrile dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) Pyoderma gangrenosum Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis Behçet's disease Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome Pustular psoriasis Acrodermatitis continua and palmoplantar pustulosis Subcorneal pustular dermatosis (Sneddon-Wilkinson disease) Conclusions References (97) J Am Acad Dermatol J Am Acad Dermatol Semin Arthritis Rheum Joint Bone Spine J Am Acad Dermatol Am J Med J Am Acad Dermatol J Cutan Pathol J Am Acad Dermatol J Am Acad Dermatol Med Clin North Am J Am Acad Dermatol Lancet Mayo Clin Proc J Am Acad Dermatol Semin Arthritis Rheum Mayo Clin Proc J Am Acad Dermatol Diagnostic criteria for Sweet's syndrome Cutis Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) Wien Klin Wochenschr Neutrophilic disease: a review of extracutaneous neutrophilic manifestations Eur J Dermatol The arthritis of Sweet's syndrome Arthritis Rheum Sweet syndrome in patients with solid tumors Cancer Sweet's syndrome Sweet's syndrome associated with rheumatoid arthritis Arch Intern Med Sweet's syndrome in subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus Arch Dermatol Sweet syndrome as an initial presentation in systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report and review of the literature Lupus Sweet's syndrome with systemic lupus erythematosus and herpes zoster Br J Dermatol Hydralazine-induced lupus and Sweet's syndrome. Report and review of the literature J Rheumatol A case of Sjögren's syndrome associated with Sweet's syndrome Clinical Rheumatol Sweet's syndrome revealing relapsing polychondritis Int J Dermatol The coexistence of Sweet's syndrome and Still's disease—is it merely a coincidence? J Am Acad Dermatol Takayasu's arteritis with aortic aneurysm associated with Sweet's syndrome in childhood Ann Rheum Dis Neutrophilic dermatosis Miscellaneous disorders with prominent features involving the skin and the joints A review of the use of infliximab to manage cutaneous dermatoses J Cutan Med Surg Nouvelle contribution a l'etude du phagedenisme geometrique Ann Dermatol Syphiligr Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum and inflammatory bowel disease Arch Surg Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne syndrome maps to chromosome 15q Am J Hum Genet A new autosomal dominant disorder of pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne: PAPA syndrome Mayo Clin Proc Pyoderma gangrenosum—clinical and laboratory findings in 15 patients with special reference to polyarthritis Med Pyoderma gangrenosum: a review of 86 patients Quart Journal of Med Pyoderma gangrenosum in association with psoriatic arthritis Arthritis Rheum Pyoderma gangrenosum in associations with undifferentiated seronegative spondyloarthropathy Arthritis Rheum Pyoderma gangrenosum, erythema elevatum diutinum and IgA monoclonal gammopathy Australas J Dermatol Pyoderma gangrenosum with systemic involvement J Dermatol Behçet's disease Semin Arthritis Rheum Pyoderma gangrenosum: a patient successfully treated with intralesional steroids Arch Dermatol Cited by (26) Recommended articles (6) FAQs Videos
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Clinics in Dermatology

Volume 24, Issue 6,

November–December 2006

, Pages 470-481

Abstract

Neutrophils may infiltrate all layers of the skin and consequently may cause different disorders, each with its own characteristic clinical and laboratory findings. We discuss how these disorders present and how they are diagnosed and treated. In addition, important associations with internal diseases are discussed to assist clinicians in evaluating for a concurrent illness. Because treatment of these disorders may often require systemic therapy, the potential short-term and long-term effects of commonly used medications are discussed. Finally, treatment of recalcitrant diseases, mostly by use of therapies published in the form of small case series or reports, is also included to guide clinicians in dealing with the more challenging cases.

Introduction

The neutrophilic dermatoses comprise a group of disorders characterized by recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to various layers of the skin. A disseminated disease is more likely to present with systemic symptoms, including arthralgias, fever, malaise, and weight loss, whereas a localized disease most often assumes a chronically recurrent and remitting course. In addition, associations with systemic diseases, which may often guide further diagnostic testing, are important to recognize. Histopathologic findings are helpful in making a diagnosis and localizing the predominant area of infiltration, which includes subcorneal, intraepidermal, dermal, and panniculitic diseases.1 Because systemic therapy may be necessary in recalcitrant diseases, it is important to think about comorbidities in patients and side effects that may arise during and after treatment.

Section snippets

Acute febrile dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome)

Also known as acute febrile dermatosis, Sweet's syndrome is an idiopathic disorder that is commonly associated with systemic diseases. Although it has no racial predilection, it appears to be more common in women than in men, with a 4:1 predilection. There is a trend toward a higher prevalence in Japan, and cases have been reported in children and adults.

Criteria that rest primarily on the abrupt onset of cutaneous lesions and consistent histopathology, in addition to prompt response to

Pyoderma gangrenosum

Pyoderma gangrenosum occurs worldwide, with an overrepresentation in women aged between 30 and 60 years. It is a chronic disease that may occur in isolation of systemic diseases 50% of the time. Its important associations include inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease), arthritic disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative arthritis, as well as myeloproliferative disease, myelodysplasia, and leukemia. In addition, chronic hepatitis, diabetes, thyroid

Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis

Although it has often been considered as a result of excretion of chemotherapeutic drugs by eccrine glands, neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis is included in this review because it is often in the differential diagnosis of neutrophilic dermatosis. In addition, mounting evidence suggest that this disorder may also arise in the setting of treatment for HIV or in the setting of malignancy previously untreated with chemotherapy.43

Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis presents as erythematous edematous

Behçet's disease

A systemic multiorgan disease of unclear etiology, Behçet's disease can involve virtually any organ in the body. Diagnostic criteria have been outlined.48 Etiologically, autoimmune and infectious mechanisms have been postulated, although the search for potential infectious culprits has been unrevealing.49, 50 Patients should have evidence of apthous stomatitis, plus 2 other findings including genital ulcerations, skin lesions, ocular abnormalities, arthritis, and synovitis, or have a positive

Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome

This uncommon syndrome is seen as a result of gastroenterological pathology. Whether medical in nature or surgically created, patients present with diarrhea, arthritis, and cutaneous manifestations. The disease occurs most commonly after ileojejunal bypass surgery, the creation of a blind loop of bowel, or pancreatobiliary diversion. It may also be observed in the setting of inflammatory bowel disease, peptic ulcer disease, diverticulitis, or liver disease, highlighting the fact that this is

Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome

Unlike the entities discussed, the synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome has been fully described and studied only in the past 40 years. It is primarily seen in children and young adults and is reportable in patients older than 60 years. It consists of a clinical syndrome of sterile neutrophilic infiltration of skin, articular surfaces, and bone. There is no racial or sexual predilection, but the disease is seen more commonly in Japan and Europe than in the United

Pustular psoriasis

Acute attacks of generalized pustular psoriasis often present as a syndrome that includes fever and malaise. When present chronically, failure to thrive, weight loss, and myalgias are disclosed in a review of systems. It is uncommon to see other types of psoriasis in the same patient, but occasional pustules can be seen in chronically relapsing plaque psoriasis.75 Generalized pustular psoriasis (von Zumbusch's type) presents with 2- to 3-mm pustules over an erythematous base (Fig. 6). The

Acrodermatitis continua and palmoplantar pustulosis

Localized pustular psoriasis can occur in the setting of known pustular psoriasis, but it can be divided into 2 main categories—acrodermatitis continua and palmoplantar pustulosis—when recurrent in a specific anatomical distribution.

(Video) Lecture-99: Neutrophilic Dermatoses, Part-1

Hallopeau's acrodermatitis continua suppurativa is a sterile pustular dermatosis that occurs primarily in distal acral distributions and migrates proximally. Digital and nail involvement is common, and destruction of the nail apparatus may be observed. Because

Subcorneal pustular dermatosis (Sneddon-Wilkinson disease)

The unifying characteristics of this disorder are a diffuse pustular eruption, which is sterile and shows mostly polymorphonuclear leukocytes with negative immunofluorescence on histopathologic sections. This disorder is more common in women and in those older than 40 years but can occur at any age. Although it is most common in White patients, reports in those with darker skin types are available.87

The disease often arises in normal or slightly erythematous skin in the form of vesicles that

Conclusions

The neutrophilic dermatoses comprise a number of disorders characterized by infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into various layers of the cutis and subcutis. Diagnosis relies on characteristic features of the physical examination, laboratory testing, and histopathologic evaluation. Treatment is directed at inhibiting neutrophilic migration and function, usually with sulfa drugs and immunosuppressant medications. As a result, it is important to exclude (or treat) infection before

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  • Cited by (26)

    • Alterations in Blood Components

      2018, Comprehensive Toxicology: Third Edition

      Cellular blood components include leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets. Leukocyte subtypes are neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. Red blood cell components include mature erythrocytes and reticulocytes. Increases or decreases in cell counts/concentrations for each of these blood components may occur in response to many stimuli or pathologic conditions, including stress, inflammation, infectious agents, neoplasia, and the toxic effects of endogenous, environmental, or pharmaceutical compounds. Changes may be limited to a few blood components or may be observed in all blood components depending on the stimulus. Morphologic alterations in blood components may also be observed in conjunction with alterations in blood cell counts. Specific examples of conditions that cause alterations in blood components are described, as well as the mechanisms by which many of these specific alterations occur. Many xenobiotics are able to cause similar alterations in blood components through the same or comparable mechanisms, and examples of xenobiotic-induced alterations in blood components are provided.

    • Sweet syndrome: A review and update

      2016, Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas

      Although there are no guidelines for the treatment of Sweet's syndrome, systemic corticosteroids are the first-line of treatment in most cases; oral therapy with either potassium iodide or colchicine in patients for whom corticosteroids are contraindicated also typically results in the rapid resolution of Sweet's syndrome symptoms and lesions.49 Cutaneous and extracutaneous manifestations tend to improve within the first 72 h of the start of therapy.50 Sweet's syndrome can be treated initially by general corticotherapy with prednisone or with an initial prednisone dosage of 30–60 mg/day (0.5–1.5 mg/kg/day), with subsequent gradual reduction.7,51

      Sweet syndrome is the most representative entity of febrile neutrophilic dermatoses. It typically presents in patients with pirexya, neutrophilia, painful tender erytomatous papules, nodules and plaques often distributed asymmetrically. Frequent sites include the face, neck and upper extremities. Affected sites show a characteristical neutrophilic infiltrate in the upper dermis. Its etiology remains elucidated, but it seems that can be mediated by a hypersensitivity reaction in which cytokines, followed by infiltration of neutrophils, may be involved. Systemic corticosteroids are the first-line of treatment in most cases. We present a concise review of the pathogenesis, classification, diagnosis and treatment update of this entity.

      El síndrome de Sweet es la entidad más representativa de las dermatosis neutrofílicas. Por lo general se presenta en pacientes con fiebre, neutrofilia, pápulas erytomatosas dolorosas, nódulos y placas. Los sitios frecuentemente afectados incluyen la cara, cuello y extremidades superiores los cuales característicamente presentan un infiltrado neutrofílico en la dermis superior. Su etiología no esta bien establecida, pero parece que puede estar mediada por una reacción de hipersensibilidad de las citocinas, seguido por un infiltrado de neutrófilos. Los corticosteroides sistémicos son la primera línea de tratamiento en la mayoría de los casos. Se presenta una revisión actual de la patogénesis, clasificación, diagnóstico y tratamiento de esta entidad.

    • Neutrophilic dermatosis resembling Sweet's syndrome: Description in the dog from to clinical cases

      2012, Pratique Medicale et Chirurgicale de l'Animal de Compagnie

      Chez l’Homme, le syndrome de Sweet est une dermatose polymorphe pouvant associer des papules, des pustules, des vésicules, des plaques et des nodules douloureux. Elle est le plus souvent d’apparition aiguë et s’accompagne fréquemment de signes extracutanés (hyperthermie, troubles respiratoires ou digestifs). L’hémogramme révèle souvent une neutrophilie franche. L’examen histopathologique est la clé du diagnostic même s’il n’est pas spécifique et se caractérise par une infiltration de la peau par des neutrophiles normaux. Nous décrivons dans cet article le cas de deux chiens qui présentent des signes cliniques biologiques et histopathologiques compatibles avec un syndrome de Sweet.

      The human Sweet's syndrome is a polymorphic dermatosis including papules, pustules, vesicles, plaques and painful nodules. An acute onset, extracutaneous signs like pyrexia, respiratory or bowel disease and elevated neutrophil count are classical features. Histopathological changes, consisting predominantly of mature neutrophils typically located in the upper dermis, are the key of the diagnosis even they are not specific. We describe two canine cases with clinical biological histopathological signs looking like Sweet's syndrome.

    • Sweet's syndrome as the presenting manifestation of relapsing polychondritis

      2010, Revue de Medecine Interne

      La polychondrite atrophiante (PCA) est une affection rare, correspondant à une inflammation des cartilages et évoluant par poussées successives. Au cours de cette affection, les manifestations dermatologiques sont rares. Nous rapportons l’observation d’un patient de 73ans ayant présenté une dermatose neutrophilique (syndrome de Sweet) révélant une PCA. Le bilan étiologique ne retrouvait pas de myélodysplasie mais le patient était suivi pour une leucémie lymphoïde chronique indolente, non traitée. Une rémission dermatologique sous corticoïdes oraux était obtenue. Cette observation illustre le polymorphisme clinique de la PCA.

      Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent inflammatory episodes involving various cartilages. The clinical course of RP is variable, and dermatologic manifestations are uncommon. We report a 73-year-old patient who presented with a neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet's syndrome) as the initial manifestation of RP. There was no evidence for a myelodysplastic syndrome, as it has been previously reported with RP, but the patient was followed-up for an indolent and untreated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Complete remission was obtained with oral corticosteroids. This report highlights the clinical spectrum of the RP.

    • Skin Manifestations of Internal Disease

      2009, Medical Clinics of North America

      The latter is often used when painful ulcerations occur about the ankles leading to atrophe blanche, a type of ulcer that heals with atrophic, white centers (Fig. 7). The neutrophilic dermatoses are a spectrum of distinct clinical diseases characterized by sterile neutrophilic cutaneous infiltrates.43 The cause of these disorders is not well understood but is thought to be related to deposition of immune complexes in dermal vessels, resulting in complement fixation and leukocytoclastic vasculitis and altered neutrophilic chemotaxis.44

      (Video) Neutrophilic dermatoses by Dr Mohamed Aidaros
    • Neutrophilic dermatoses: Kids are not just little people

      2017, Clinics in Dermatology

      Direct IF (DIF) is negative in SPD. It is important to rule out IgA pemphigus with DIF, because it is clinically indistinguishable from SPD.70 First-line therapy is dapsone 50 to 200 mg/day for both adults and children, and patients typically respond within 1 to 4 weeks.67

      Neutrophilic dermatoses are a group of inflammatory skin disorders characterized by an overactive innate immune system with dysregulation of neutrophils without underlying infectious etiology. The major representative conditions discussed are Sweet syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum; neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis; palmoplantar eccrine hidradenitis; subcorneal pustular dermatoses; bowel-associated dermatosis arthritis syndrome; and synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis. We will also discuss other neutrophilic conditions present almost exclusively in the pediatric population, including congenital erosive and vesicular dermatosis with reticulated supple scarring and the recently described group of autoinflammatory diseases. The clinical characteristics, diagnostic approach, and treatment management in the pediatric and adult population are discussed.

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    Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    FAQs

    How do you treat neutrophilic dermatoses? ›

    Treatment of neutrophilic dermatosis of the hands usually results in rapid improvement in symptoms. Usually, ultrapotent topical corticosteroids and/or systemic corticosteroids, such as predniso(lo)ne, are prescribed in a dose of 30-40 mg daily. Within a few days the fever, skin lesions and other symptoms clear up.

    What causes neutrophilic dermatosis? ›

    Sweet's syndrome, also called acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is an uncommon skin condition. It causes fever and a painful skin rash that appears mostly on the arms, face and neck. The cause of Sweet's syndrome isn't known, but it's sometimes triggered by an infection, illness or medication.

    Are neutrophilic dermatoses autoinflammatory disorders? ›

    Due to similarities in terms of clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and therapeutic approach, neutrophilic dermatoses have recently been suggested to be part of a spectrum of autoinflammatory disorders.

    What is neutrophilic disease? ›

    Neutrophilic diseases are a spectrum of inflammatory conditions characterized by polymorphic cutaneous lesions resulting from a neutrophil-rich inflammatory infiltrate in the absence of infection and by possible involvement of almost any organ system.

    What causes Sweet's disease? ›

    Classical: The disorder occurs with other medical conditions like upper respiratory infections, pregnancy, or gastrointestinal infections. Malignancy-associated: Sweet syndrome appears with certain types of cancer, like acute myeloid leukemia. Drug-induced: Certain medications trigger Sweet syndrome.

    How long does Sweet syndrome last? ›

    Attacks usually last between two and four weeks and may recur during the fall and spring for several years. (For more information on this disorder, choose “erythema multiforme” as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

    What if neutrophils are high? ›

    Neutrophilia: Neutrophilia, also known as neutrophilic leukocytosis, occurs when your neutrophil count is too high, which is often the result of a bacterial infection. To combat the infection, immature neutrophils leave your bone marrow too soon and enter into your bloodstream.

    Is there a cure for Sweet's syndrome? ›

    Sweet's syndrome might go away without treatment. But medications can speed the process. The most common medications used for this condition are corticosteroids: Pills.

    Is Sweet syndrome autoimmune? ›

    Key Messages. Sweet syndrome is a rare skin condition characterised by fever and sudden onset of painful skin lesions. In rare cases, Sweet syndrome has been reported to occur in association with Sjögren's syndrome, an autoimmune condition characterised by dry eyes and mouth.

    What is the sweet syndrome? ›

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a neutrophilic dermatosis characterized by the abrupt appearance of edematous and erythematous papules, plaques, or nodules on the skin. Fever, leukocytosis, and internal organ involvement can also occur.

    Can stress affect neutrophils? ›

    Psychological stress or life events might significantly decrease neutrophil function in elderly individuals and lead to infectious diseases.

    What are the symptoms of neutrophilia? ›

    A high white blood cell count may be a sign of underlying conditions that may cause symptoms such as:
    • A temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) or higher.
    • Feeling weak or tired.
    • Feeling dizzy or faint.
    • Recurring infections.
    • Sores that don't heal.
    • Swollen or painful joints.
    Feb 7, 2022

    Is neutrophilia common? ›

    Neutrophilia is the most common type of leukocytosis and defined as an increase in the absolute neutrophil count of approximately more than 7700 neutrophils/microL (11,000 cells/microL x 70 percent), i.e., two standard deviations above the mean.

    Can Sweet syndrome cause death? ›

    The recurrence of Sweet syndrome may coincide with or precede a hematological relapse. No transformation into acute myeloid leukemia occurred in our cases. However, 7 of the 9 patients died in a follow-up period of 3 to 9 years, confirming the poor prognosis of Sweet syndrome associated with myelodysplasia.

    Is Sweet syndrome serious? ›

    These symptoms can point to a number of health conditions, including one you may never have heard of: Sweet syndrome. Usually, this rare skin condition (also known as acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) isn't serious and clears up without treatment.

    Is Sweet syndrome itchy? ›

    The cutaneous manifestations of Sweet's syndrome include tender, non-itchy, red-to-purple papules and plaques that can enlarge as the disease progresses. Sometimes these lesions enlarge and may coalesce to cover large areas of the body.

    Is Sweet syndrome genetic? ›

    The exact pathogenesis of Sweet syndrome is not known. Some genetic factors such as HLA-B54 in the Japanese population, MEFV gene mutation in familial Mediterranean fever patients, and chromosome 3q abnormalities have been observed in patients with Sweet syndrome.

    What infection is called sweetie? ›

    Sweet syndrome or neutrophilic dermatosis is a rare inflammatory disorder where the patient develops acute onset of lesions (sores or blisters) on the skin (neutrophilic lesions) associated with fever, joint pains, and headache.

    Does a leukemia rash itch? ›

    In very rare cases, itchy skin can be caused by a serious underlying condition such as leukaemia. According to our patient survey “Living Well with Leukaemia”, around 9% of people with leukaemia will experience itchy skin as a symptom prior to their diagnosis.

    What cancers cause high neutrophils? ›

    Cancers that can cause neutrophilia include: Hodgkin lymphoma. This cancer starts in your lymphatic system, which is part of your immune system. Chronic myelocytic leukemia.
    ...
    Some medicines can cause neutrophilia, such as:
    • Lithium.
    • Heparin.
    • Antiepileptic drugs.
    • Minocycline.
    • Clozapine.
    • Corticosteroids.
    Jun 12, 2021

    What is a normal neutrophil count? ›

    White blood cells (WBCs)

    The most important infection-fighting WBC is the neutrophil . The number doctors look at is called your absolute neutrophil count (ANC). A healthy person has an ANC between 2,500 and 6,000.

    What bacteria causes neutrophilia? ›

    Acute bacterial infections, such as pneumococcal, staphylococcal, or leptospiral infections, are the most frequent causes of infection-induced neutrophilia. Certain viral infections, such as herpes complex, varicella, and EBV infections, may also cause neutrophilia.

    Who discovered Sweet syndrome? ›

    Dr Robert Douglas Sweet first described and used the term acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, back in 1964 based on his observations in 8 women. However, the name “Sweet's syndrome” is established as the eponym for acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis and used worldwide.

    What does a lesion look like? ›

    Skin lesions are areas of skin that look different from the surrounding area. They are often bumps or patches, and many issues can cause them. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery describe a skin lesion as an abnormal lump, bump, ulcer, sore, or colored area of the skin.

    What is a pyoderma? ›

    Pyoderma is defined as a bacterial skin infection. Pyoderma may also be referred to as impetigo, especially in young puppies.

    What autoimmune disease causes cellulitis? ›

    An autoimmune disease — such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis — can also weaken the immune system. This not only makes you vulnerable to cellulitis, but also to other infections, such colds and the flu.

    What is a granuloma on the skin? ›

    Granuloma annulare is a benign (not cancer), often chronic (long-lasting) skin disorder in which inflammation in the skin causes a raised, discolored rash or lumps under the skin. In most cases, rashes form on the hands, feet and forearms.

    What if neutrophils are high? ›

    Neutrophilia: Neutrophilia, also known as neutrophilic leukocytosis, occurs when your neutrophil count is too high, which is often the result of a bacterial infection. To combat the infection, immature neutrophils leave your bone marrow too soon and enter into your bloodstream.

    Is Sweet syndrome autoimmune? ›

    Key Messages. Sweet syndrome is a rare skin condition characterised by fever and sudden onset of painful skin lesions. In rare cases, Sweet syndrome has been reported to occur in association with Sjögren's syndrome, an autoimmune condition characterised by dry eyes and mouth.

    What is the sweet syndrome? ›

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a neutrophilic dermatosis characterized by the abrupt appearance of edematous and erythematous papules, plaques, or nodules on the skin. Fever, leukocytosis, and internal organ involvement can also occur.

    What is neutrophilic urticaria? ›

    Neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (NUD) is a rare form of dermatosis. In clinical terms, it consists of a chronic or recurrent eruption comprising slightly elevated, pink to reddish plaques or macules. The elementary lesion lasts 24 to 48hours and resolves without leaving any residual pigmentation.

    Videos

    1. neutrophilic dermatoses dr mostafa ghoniem
    (Spring Derma)
    2. Lecture-100: Neutrophilic Dermatoses, Part-2
    (Dermatology-on-line-teaching)
    3. 2 MINUTES DERMATOLOGY : SWEET SYNDROME
    (Dr Manish Soni)
    4. The 8th capsule: Neutrophilic Dermatoses
    (نهي عزت ♥️علم ينتفع به♥️)
    5. Inflammatory Dermpath 101 (A Beginner's Guide to Diagnosing Skin Rashes for Non-Dermatopathologists)
    (Jerad Gardner, MD)
    6. Tiny dermatoses
    (Dr. Ahmed Nouh)

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