Over half of badminton players suffer from shoulder pain: Is impingement to blame? (2022)

Table of Contents
Journal of Arthroscopy and Joint Surgery Abstract Background/objectives Method/materials Results/discussion Conclusion Section snippets Background Method/materials Conclusion Conflict of interest References (26) Arthroscopy Arthroscopy Arthroscopy Sports injuries in school-aged children. An epidemiologic study Am J Sports Med Epidemiology of badminton injuries Int J Sports Med A survey of badminton injuries Br J Sports Med Injuries in badminton Sports Med Acute badminton injuries Scand J Med Sci Sports Musculoskeletal injuries among Malaysian badminton players Singapore Med J Epidemiology of injuries in Hong Kong elite badminton athletes Res Sports Med Estimating the burden of musculoskeletal disorders in the community: the comparative prevalence of symptoms at different anatomical sites, and the relation to social deprivation Ann Rheum Dis Shoulder pain – a common problem in world-class badminton players Scand J Med Sci Sports Decreased shoulder function and pain common in recreational badminton players Scand J Med Sci Sports Cited by (11) Analysis of Winning Experience and Technical Training Effect of Badminton Match Based on BP Neural Network Comparative Study on Biomechanics of Two Legs in the Action of Single-Leg Landing in Men's Badminton Prevalence, patterns and factors associated with injury: comparison between elite Malaysian able-bodied and para-badminton players Epidemiology and pain in elementary school-aged players: a survey of Japanese badminton players participating in the national tournament Recommended articles (6) FAQs Videos
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Journal of Arthroscopy and Joint Surgery

Volume 2, Issue 1,

January–April 2015

, Pages 33-36

Abstract

Background/objectives

Badminton is one of the most widely played sports in the world and is considered a relatively safe sport. Despite this many badminton players report shoulder pain. The aim of this review is to summarize the available literature on current state of understanding for shoulder pain among badminton players.

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Method/materials

MEDLINE and EMBASE (Search terms: “badminton” AND “shoulder injuries”; “badminton” AND “rotator cuff tears”; “badminton” AND “impingement”; and associated synonyms) were performed in March 2014. The authors further canvassed the reference list of selected articles and online search engines such as Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria were studies that assessed shoulder injuries among badminton players. A total of 4 studies were identified on primary search, and later expanded to 10 studies.

Results/discussion

Shoulder pain affects or had affected over 50% of recreational and elite badminton players, with 20% reporting ongoing shoulder pain. There was no difference for shoulder pain prevalence between males and females. Most continue to play through the pain but report an impact on training, competition and activities of daily living. Shoulder kinematics were different for dominant and non-dominant shoulders, however the direction of difference is controversial.

Conclusion

Over half of recreational and elite badminton players report previous or current shoulder pain, most likely the result of subacromial impingement, instability or scapulothoracic dyskinesia. There appears to be no difference for shoulder pain prevalence or shoulder kinematics between male and female players. Further work is needed to better define shoulder kinematics and study the underlying pathophysiology of shoulder pain among badminton players.

Section snippets

Background

Badminton is one of the most widely played sports in the world. The Badminton World Federation estimated that about 150 million people play the game worldwide and that more than 2000 players participate in international competitions. Badminton, a non-contact sport, has been considered a very safe sport.1 Despite its global following, studies into medical problems among badminton players are sparse. This review explores our current state of understanding of shoulder pain in badminton players.

Method/materials

MEDLINE and EMBASE (Search terms: “badminton” AND “shoulder injuries”; “badminton” AND “rotator cuff tears”; “badminton” AND “impingement”; and associated synonyms) were performed in March 2014. The authors further canvassed the reference list of selected articles and online search engines such as Google Scholar. Inclusion criteria were studies that assessed shoulder injuries among badminton players. A total of 4 studies were identified on primary search, and later expanded to 10 studies.

Conclusion

Over 50% of recreational and elite badminton players report previous or current shoulder pain, most likely the result of subacromial impingement, anterior instability or scapulothoracic dyskinesia. Most players continue to play through the pain, but report that the pain affects their play and non-play related activities. There appears to be no difference for shoulder pain prevalence or shoulder kinematics between male and female players. Further work is needed to better define shoulder

Conflict of interest

All authors have none to declare.

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  • S.S. Burkhart et al.The disabled throwing shoulder: spectrum of pathology Part III: the SICK scapula, scapular dyskinesis, the kinetic chain, and rehabilitation

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    (Video) MSK Upper Extremity Review | Mnemonics And Proven Ways To Memorize For Your Exams!

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    • Injuries in badminton: A review

      2020, Science and Sports

      The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the injury risks in badminton, by exploring and takes a global approach related to the eyes, and upper and lower limbs. This explain how the injury occurred and as well as medical and training recommendations for athletic population.

      Badminton injuries are around 1–5% of all sports injuries. It ranked six after soccer, basketball, volleyball, long-distance running and cycling.

      Such knowledge could help coaches and fitness trainers focus on the specific muscular activities required to prevent injuries. The relationship between scientists and coaches, particularly in terms of biomechanics and physiotherapy, will help improve performance and prevent injury.

      Badminton will be influenced by the evolution of intensity of the game. It is apparent that the movement patterns and movement demands are related to an increase in injuries and the generation of new injuries. Eye injury occurs when shuttlecock impact from an opponent's stroke. Wearing glasses can considerably reduce the risk of eye injury. Injuries to the arm and shoulder are due to faulty technique, while leg and back injuries are caused mainly by a lack of strength or mobility. The contribution of the trunk to the prevention of lower limb injuries suggests that specific attention should be paid to this area. Fatigue influences the way that lunges are performed, and the jump is received by making these tendons less powerful and more unstable. Training program increases body strength to prevent injuries.

      L’objectif de cette revue est de fournir un aperçu sur les risques de blessures en badminton en explorant et en adoptant une approche globale des blessures des yeux, des membres supérieurs et inférieurs. Cela explique comment la blessure a eu lieu et de ce fait, propose des recommandations médicales et d’entraînement pour les sportifs.

      Les blessures en badminton sont autour de 1–5% des blessures sportives. Elles sont classées sixième après celles du football, du basketball, du volleyball, de la course à pied et du vélo.

      Les connaissances pourraient aider les entraîneurs et les préparateurs physiques à se focaliser sur les activités musculaires spécifiques dans la prévention des blessures. La relation entre les scientifiques et les entraîneurs, notamment en biomécanique et en physiothérapie contribuera à améliorer les performances et prévenir les blessures.

      Le badminton sera influencé par l’évolution de l’intensité des échanges. Il est visible que les modèles et les exigences des mouvements vont augmenter le nombre de blessures et d’en générer de nouvelles. Une blessure oculaire survient suite à un coup de volant frappé par l’adversaire. Le port de lunette peut réduire considérablement le risque de blessure aux yeux. Les blessures au bras et à l’épaule sont dues à une mauvaise technique, tandis que les blessures aux jambes et au dos sont principalement causées par un manque de force ou de mobilité. La contribution du tronc dans la prévention des blessures des membres inférieurs suggère une attention toute particulière à cette zone. La fatigue influence la production des fentes et la réception des sauts rend les tendons moins puissants et plus instables. Les programmes ciblés d’entraînements augmentent la force du corps afin de prévenir les blessures.

    • Local Euler Angle Pattern Recognition for Smash and Backhand in Badminton Based on Arm Position

      2015, Procedia Manufacturing

      Badminton is the most favourite sport in Indonesia. Since elementary school or earlier, children play badminton in a formal class or informal games. So, there are so many kind of styles in playing badminton. In this research, the pattern of arm kinesiology while playing badminton was studied, especially smash and backhand. The right arm of human was segmented into four parts: shoulder, elbow, wrist and back of hand. The 3-dimension local Euler angle of each parts was recorded by using gyro sensor made by Motion Node. The pattern of the segment position was investigated to distinguish smash and backhand. The result shows that there was a clear pattern caused by the movement of four parts of arm while performing smash and backhand. This pattern can be used to evaluate a process of arm moving while performing smash or backhand in badminton.

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    FAQs

    Can playing badminton cause shoulder pain? ›

    Shoulder injuries and shoulder pain are common in badminton due to repetitive overhead strokeplay. Postural asymmetry is typically considered to be associated with injuries. However, asymmetry in the overhead athlete's scapula is a normal finding due to the dominant use of the limb.

    What causes impingement of the shoulder? ›

    Shoulder impingement occurs when the tendon rubs against the acromion. The causes of this impingement include: Your tendon is torn or swollen. This can be due to overuse from repetitive activity of the shoulder, injury or from age-related wear and tear.

    What common injury that a badminton player will most likely? ›

    Ankle injuries, such as ankle sprains and fractures, are one of the most common badminton injuries. There is a high incidence of Achilles tendon rupture in badminton players. Achilles tendon injuries most commonly occur at the middle or end of a badminton game.

    Who is affected by shoulder impingement? ›

    Age. People who are 50 or older are more likely to develop impingement syndrome than younger people. Bone spurs that may develop from wear and tear on bones. This rough spot of bone irritate the surrounding tissue causing swelling.

    Can badminton cause shoulder dislocation? ›

    The shoulder joint is more flexible than most of your other joints and hence most commonly dislocated. Causes: How can you acquire a dislocated shoulder? Injuries sustained due to throwing actions in cricket or in overhead sports like badminton, squash, tennis etc.

    How do you stop shoulder pain in badminton? ›

    What can you do to prevent a Rotator Cuff Injury? Badminton players must pay attention to flexibility, strength and endurance of the shoulder muscles. Shoulder stabilisation exercises under the supervision of a physiotherapist can also help prevent pressure on the rotator cuff tendons.

    How serious is shoulder impingement? ›

    If left untreated, a shoulder impingement can lead to more serious conditions, such as a rotator cuff tear. Physical therapists help decrease pain and improve shoulder motion and strength in people with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    What exercises cause shoulder impingement? ›

    Impingement occurs when the rotator cuff tendons get pinched between the bones in the shoulder during activities. The repetitive pinching can cause pain and inflammation of the shoulder. Impingement is most common in people who do frequent overhead shoulder activities (swimming, painting, baseball, tennis, golf etc.)

    How do you fix a shoulder impingement? ›

    Taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), can help reduce swelling and shoulder pain. If these medications, along with ice and rest, don't reduce your pain, your doctor might prescribe steroid injections to reduce swelling and pain.

    How do you strengthen your shoulders for badminton? ›

    Four shoulder strengthening exercises - YouTube

    What are the 7 common badminton injuries? ›

    Most common Badminton injuries
    • Tennis elbow. ...
    • Golfer's elbow. ...
    • RSI/Wrist tendonitis. ...
    • Wrist Strain. ...
    • Rotator cuff tendinopathy. ...
    • Rotator cuff injuries. ...
    • Ankle Sprains. ...
    • Jumper's knee.

    How do you treat a shoulder injury? ›

    Home Care
    1. Put ice on the shoulder area for 15 minutes, then leave it off for 15 minutes. Do this 3 to 4 times a day for 2 to 3 days. ...
    2. Rest your shoulder for the next few days.
    3. Slowly return to your regular activities. ...
    4. Taking ibuprofen or acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) may help reduce inflammation and pain.

    Can shoulder impingement be caused by an injury? ›

    Causes of shoulder impingement

    This can be caused by: the tendon becoming swollen, thickened or torn – this can be due to an injury, overuse of the shoulder (for example, from sports such as swimming or tennis) or "wear and tear" with age.

    Can you get disability for shoulder impingement? ›

    If you can prove that your shoulder injury is serious enough that it leaves you unable to perform fine and gross movements, you may be eligible for disability. Symptoms you must have that cause severe chronic pain and limits movement include: Chronic joint pain or stiffness.

    Does shoulder impingement need surgery? ›

    While most cases of shoulder impingement can be treated without surgery, sometimes it is recommended. A doctor may suggest surgery if nonsurgical treatment options do not adequately relieve shoulder pain and improve range of motion. Surgery can create more room for the soft tissues that are being squeezed.

    Can you fully recover from a shoulder dislocation? ›

    You can stop wearing the sling after a few days, but it takes about 12 to 16 weeks to completely recover from a dislocated shoulder. You'll usually be able to resume most activities within 2 weeks, but should avoid heavy lifting and sports involving shoulder movements for between 6 weeks and 3 months.

    Can a dislocated shoulder go back to normal? ›

    A fairly simple shoulder dislocation without major nerve or tissue damage likely will improve over a few weeks. Having full range of motion without pain and regained strength are necessary before returning to regular activities.

    Does badminton cause muscle loss? ›

    Badminton alone won't give you the 'show' muscles, though it will improve your 'go' muscles. Singles players are on the slimmer side of body mass.

    Does badminton use shoulder? ›

    When we play badminton we use the muscle of the shoulder joint very time we swing the racket so understanding how the shoulder joint works and how the muscles contract is very important. The shoulder is one of the joints on the body with the greatest degree of movement and most complex movement.

    How do you prevent shoulder problems? ›

    Increasing strength and flexibility is the best way to keep your shoulders healthy and prevent injuries.
    ...
    When lifting to strengthen your shoulders, make sure to include these exercises:
    1. Standing Row with Resistance Bands.
    2. External Rotation with Arm Abducted.
    3. Internal and External Rotation.
    4. Elbow Flexion and Extension.
    16 May 2019

    Should I workout with shoulder pain? ›

    Exercise shouldn't make your existing shoulder pain worse overall. However, practicing new exercises can sometimes cause short term muscle pain as the body gets used to moving in new ways. This kind of pain should ease quickly and your pain should be no worse the morning after you've exercised.

    How long can shoulder impingement last? ›

    Most cases will heal in three to six months, but more severe cases can take up to a year to heal.

    Is heat good for shoulder impingement? ›

    Heat may soothe aching muscles, but it won't reduce inflammation. Use a heating pad or take a warm shower or bath. Do this for 15 minutes at a time. Don't use heat when pain is constant.

    How do you test for impingement syndrome? ›

    Technique. The examiner places the patient's arm shoulder in 90 degrees of shoulder flexion with the elbow flexed to 90 degrees and then internally rotates the arm. The test is considered to be positive if the patient experiences pain with internal rotation.

    Does stretching help shoulder impingement? ›

    Background: Stretching and strengthening exercises have been shown to effectively decrease pain and disability in individuals with shoulder impingement syndrome. There is still conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of adding manual therapy to an exercise therapy regimen.

    Is massage good for shoulder impingement? ›

    Manual Therapy.

    Your physical therapist may use manual techniques, such as gentle joint movements, soft-tissue massage, and shoulder stretches to get your shoulder moving properly, so that the tendons and bursa avoid impingement.

    Does frozen shoulder cause impingement? ›

    Frozen shoulder causes a person to not be able to turn their arm out and can be quite painful even when motionless and especially at night. While there is some overlap in symptoms, shoulder impingement is caused by a swollen rotator cuff.

    Can I lift weights with shoulder impingement? ›

    Once you've been diagnosed with shoulder impingement, you must stop lifting weights overhead for a short time to allow the tendons in your shoulder to heal. You can then begin a physical therapy program to restore mobility in your shoulder.

    What does an impinged shoulder feel like? ›

    The typical symptoms of impingement syndrome include difficulty reaching up behind the back, pain with overhead use of the arm and weakness of shoulder muscles. If tendons are injured for a long period of time, the tendon can actually tear in two, resulting in a rotator cuff tear.

    Is shoulder impingement acute or chronic? ›

    Chronic shoulder problems usually fall into one of several categories, which include impingement syndrome, frozen shoulder and biceps tendonitis. Other causes of chronic shoulder pain are labral injury, osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral or acromioclavicular joint and, rarely, osteolysis of the distal clavicle.

    What are the disadvantages of playing badminton? ›

    Disadvantages
    • There Is Always The Risk of Injury. ...
    • Badminton Is Underrated. ...
    • You Can't Play Badminton Alone. ...
    • Badminton Isn't Free. ...
    • It May Be Time Consuming. ...
    • There Is A Learning Curve. ...
    • Your Height Can Be a Disadvantage. ...
    • It Isn't a Team Sport.

    How do you use a badminton shoulder? ›

    Badminton Shoulder Rotation - For More Smash Power. - YouTube

    What is the first aid needed for shoulder injury? ›

    FIRST AID: Put an ice pack on it to reduce bleeding, swelling, and pain. Wrap the ice pack in a moist towel. Keep using ICE packs for 10-20 minutes every hour for the first 4 hours. Then use ice for 10-20 minutes 4 times a day for the first 2 days.

    Is badminton easier than tennis? ›

    So is Tennis or Badminton harder? If you take the various areas of comparison for each sport we find that Badminton is a lot harder physically when it comes to speed, agility and explosive power. Badminton also has a lot more variations of strokes compared to Tennis so there is more to learn.

    Is playing badminton safe? ›

    Badminton is usually considered safe because it doesn't involve physical contact. But shuttlecocks are small and dense and usually travel at high speed, and in close proximity to players.

    What are 4 common shoulder injuries? ›

    Common Injuries of the Shoulder
    • Shoulder instability. Shoulder instability happens most often in young people and athletes. ...
    • Rotator cuff tear. The rotator cuff is a group of 4 muscles of the upper arm. ...
    • Frozen shoulder. This extreme stiffness in the shoulder can happen at any age. ...
    • Overuse/strains. ...
    • Arthritis.

    What is the fastest way to cure shoulder pain? ›

    Easy remedies at home
    1. Anti-inflammatory medication. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS) help to relieve pain and lower inflammation. ...
    2. Cold compress. Cold compresses can help reduce swelling in the shoulder. ...
    3. Compression. ...
    4. Heat therapy. ...
    5. Muscle relaxants. ...
    6. Pain medication. ...
    7. Rest and activity modification.
    4 Sept 2018

    When is shoulder pain serious? ›

    Call Emergency Services if you have sudden pressure or crushing pain in your shoulder, especially if the pain starts in your chest, jaw, or neck. If you fall on your shoulder and feel sudden intense pain, you should see a doctor because you may have torn rotator cuff or dislocated your shoulder.

    Does badminton use shoulder? ›

    When we play badminton we use the muscle of the shoulder joint very time we swing the racket so understanding how the shoulder joint works and how the muscles contract is very important. The shoulder is one of the joints on the body with the greatest degree of movement and most complex movement.

    Does badminton hurt your arm? ›

    Badminton players regularly pace back and forth on the court, making sudden starts, stops, and twists, which can cause undue injury to their joints. Players also often overextend their arms and twist their wrists and shoulders in order to reach a difficult play.

    Does badminton cause muscle loss? ›

    Badminton alone won't give you the 'show' muscles, though it will improve your 'go' muscles. Singles players are on the slimmer side of body mass.

    How do you strengthen your shoulders for badminton? ›

    SHOULDER STRENGTHENING EXERCISES FOR BADMINTON

    How do you use a badminton shoulder? ›

    Badminton Shoulder Rotation - For More Smash Power. - YouTube

    Why are badminton players so thin? ›

    Unlike other sports, badminton makes use of almost all the muscles in your body. You sweat a lot and get rid of the unwanted water in your body. More than everything, you wont get an artificial body shape like you get when you work out at the gym. Playing badminton gives you a naturally toned body.

    What are the common causes of injuries in playing badminton? ›

    Badminton injuries are usually overuse injuries which develop from repeated overhead movements. Injuries to the shoulder, elbow, wrist, knees, and ankle are common. Injuries to the lower limb can also occur due to the high proportion of jumping and quick changes of direction.

    What is the first aid needed for shoulder injury? ›

    FIRST AID: Put an ice pack on it to reduce bleeding, swelling, and pain. Wrap the ice pack in a moist towel. Keep using ICE packs for 10-20 minutes every hour for the first 4 hours. Then use ice for 10-20 minutes 4 times a day for the first 2 days.

    How do you treat a shoulder injury? ›

    Home Care
    1. Put ice on the shoulder area for 15 minutes, then leave it off for 15 minutes. Do this 3 to 4 times a day for 2 to 3 days. ...
    2. Rest your shoulder for the next few days.
    3. Slowly return to your regular activities. ...
    4. Taking ibuprofen or acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) may help reduce inflammation and pain.

    How do you get rid of arm pain after playing badminton? ›

    Rest – Rest is a crucial part of elbow pain treatment, as it minimizes the chances of further injury. Icing your elbow can prevent swelling, and elevation can help drain fluid from the injured area. Exercises – Warming up and stretching before playing badminton can help get your blood flowing and minimize pain.

    Why does my body hurt after badminton? ›

    “Due to the nature of the sport and repeated stretching, lower body, back and lumbar spine injuries are the most common,” says Matt. On-court jumping, moving, and start/stop running also weakens "the ankles, raising the risk of sprains or injuries to the Achilles tendon,” he adds.

    What are the disadvantages of playing badminton? ›

    Disadvantages
    • There Is Always The Risk of Injury. ...
    • Badminton Is Underrated. ...
    • You Can't Play Badminton Alone. ...
    • Badminton Isn't Free. ...
    • It May Be Time Consuming. ...
    • There Is A Learning Curve. ...
    • Your Height Can Be a Disadvantage. ...
    • It Isn't a Team Sport.

    Does badminton reduce belly fat? ›

    Definitely it helps in burning belly fat as badminton is a game in which fast or quick reactions are required. It also helps in increasing mental strength, stamina, hand-eye coordination.

    Which is better badminton or gym? ›

    A gym is a great option if you are looking forward to building muscles and reducing fat. For physical activity and exercise for weight loss, badminton is a good option. Playing badminton also has a lot of other benefits which make this game a better option for weight loss and physical activity.

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