Pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: What to know (2022) (2022)

Pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (PJRA) is a form of arthritis that affects children and adolescents. The pauciarticular in PJRA means that it involves fewer than five joints.

PJRA is a previous term used for this condition, which is now known as oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (oligoarticular JIA). It is one of several subtypes of JIA.

The term juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is no longer widely used by healthcare professionals. This is because most forms of juvenile arthritis are different from adult rheumatoid arthritis. Oligoarticular JIA is also known as oligoarthritis.

Oligoarticular JIA causes the child’s immune system to attack the tissue lining of their joints, called the synovium. This causes inflammation, making the joint tender, painful, or hard to move.

Read on to learn more about oligoarticular JIA, including its symptoms, causes, and treatments.

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The word oligoarticular means “few joints”. A child with oligoarticular JIA will have up to four joints affected. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) notes that around 50% of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have the oligoarticular form.

Oligoarticular JIA mainly affects a child’s lower limbs, such as the knee or ankle. Common symptoms of JIA include:

  • joint pain and stiffness, which may increase after waking up or being in the same position for too long
  • red, tender, warm, or swollen joints
  • fatigue
  • rash
  • appetite loss
  • fever
  • blurred vision
  • dry, gritty eyes

The AAOS states that approximately half of children with oligoarticular JIA experience symptoms in only one joint. Experts call this form of JIA monoarticular juvenile arthritis. A child with monoarticular juvenile arthritis may have mild symptoms that reduce or disappear altogether.

Oligoarticular JIA can also affect a child’s eyes. Around 20–30% of children with oligoarticular JIA also develop eye inflammation, called uveitis. This affects the inner layer of the eye, causing blurry vision and eye pain.

If a child with oligoarticular JIA experiences vision problems, they may require regular checkups with an ophthalmologist, a doctor specializing in eye care. If a child is antinuclear antibody (ANA) positive, they are evaluated every several months. Without regular checkups, a child with uveitis may develop a permanent visual impairment or even go blind.

Oligoarticular JIA occurs when a child’s immune system attacks the synovium of their joints. However, experts currently do not know the exact cause of oligoarticular JIA.

Specialists suggest that some children may have genes that cause oligoarticular JIA to develop in the presence of a virus, bacteria, or other external factor. Female children under the age of 8 years old are also more likely to develop oligoarticular JIA.

Oligoarticular JIA is not an inherited disease — a child’s parents cannot pass it on to them.

(Video) Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Everything You Need To Know

There are two types of oligoarticular JIA that a child can develop::

Persistent oligoarticular JIA: This term is used when oligoarticular JIA continues to only affect four or fewer joints.

Extended oligoarticular JIA: This may develop six months after oligoarticular JIA symptoms begin. A child with extended oligoarticular JIA will begin to feel oligoarticular JIA symptoms in more than four joints. Extended oligoarticular JIA occurs in one-third of children who have oligoarticular JIA.

A child has to meet certain characteristics to receive a JIA diagnosis. They have to be under the age of 16 and have experienced inflammation for more than six weeks. Additionally, doctors must rule out other causes of pain.

A doctor may then refer the child to a pediatric or adult rheumatologist, a doctor specializing in arthritis treatment. The doctor may ask about the child’s medical history, when symptoms started, and how long they lasted.

The child’s doctor may also examine them for any joint pain, warmth, or tenderness. They may also test the child’s range of motion and look for any signs of stiffness. Additionally, the doctor may check the child’s eyes for signs of inflammation.

The doctor may also need to take a sample of the child’s blood to look for any indicators of arthritis. Blood tests for JIA can include:

Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test: This measures the rate that red blood cells settle at the bottom of a test tube. A high ESR rate indicates active inflammation.

C-reactive protein (CRP) test: CRP is a protein found in a person’s blood. CRP levels increase when there is inflammation in the body.

Antinuclear antibody (ANA) test: This looks for the presence of ANAs within a person’s blood. ANAs may indicate that a person has an autoimmune disorder, but this can be detected in other conditions.

A doctor may also order tests, such as X-rays or ultrasounds, to look for any indicators of joint damage and inflammation.

(Video) Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): Pathology & Clinical Presentation – Pediatrics | Lecturio

There is currently no cure for oligoarticular JIA. However, a child may be able to have reduced or no symptoms with proper treatment. Treatment for JIA includes:

Medication

There are various medications for the treatment of oligoarticular JIA. These can include:

(Video) Addressing the Burden of Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

  • disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which suppress the immune system to prevent it from attacking a child’s joints
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, to help relieve inflammation and pain
  • biologic agents that work to slow the progression of JIA, although these are generally only used if DMARDs do not work
  • corticosteroids, which is a stronger form of medication that doctors may use to treat more severe JIA

Surgery

If a child has a very severe form of oligoarticular JIA or is experiencing serious complications, they may require surgery.

Surgery for oligoarticular JIA can involve repositioning joints or removing loose pieces of cartilage.

A surgeon may also need to replace parts of a damaged joint with a metal, plastic, or ceramic prosthesis.

Non-medical treatment

Non-medical treatments, such as exercise and physical therapy, may benefit a child with oligoarticular JIA. Low-impact activities, such as walking or yoga, may help to relieve joint stiffness or pain. Additionally, physical therapy can help a child with oligoarticular JIA improve their balance and coordination.

Occupational therapy may also be useful to a child with oligoarticular JIA, as it can help them learn about staying active and performing daily tasks easily.

Additionally, there are certain habits and lifestyle changes that can help ease oligoarticular JIA pain, such as:

  • cutting back on fatty, sugary, and processed foods
  • eating fish, fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and extra virgin olive oil
  • using heat pads and taking warm baths when joints become stiff
  • using ice packs on areas of pain and inflammation
  • trying relaxation techniques, such as meditation or reading
  • having massage or acupuncture
  • taking breaks to rest

PJRA is an older term used to describe oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (oligoarticular JIA). Oligoarticular JIA is a form of arthritis that affects children and is one of several subtypes of JIA. Oligoarticular JIA causes inflammation in up to four joints in a child’s body, causing stiffness and pain.

Oligoarticular JIA can also cause eye inflammation, called uveitis. It is important that a child with oligoarticular JIA who develops uveitis has frequent eye checks to prevent blindness.

To receive a diagnosis of oligoarticular JIA, a child needs to be under the age of 16 and experience inflammation for more than six weeks. A doctor may ask questions about the child’s medical history and pain when diagnosing oligoarticular JIA. A doctor may also order blood or imaging tests to look for signs of oligoarticular JIA.

(Video) Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): Diagnosis & Management – Pediatrics | Lecturio

There is currently no known cause of oligoarticular JIA. However, experts suggest that oligoarticular JIA may result from genes reacting to certain outside factors, such as a virus.

There is currently no cure for oligoarticular JIA. However, treatments for oligoarticular JIA can help to reduce symptoms. Caregivers should speak with a doctor about what oligoarticular JIA treatment would work best for their child.

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FAQs

What is Pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? ›

Pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (PJRA) is a form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Oligoarticular JIA is a newer name for the condition. All forms of JIA cause swelling and inflammation in the joints of children under 16. A diagnosis of PJRA means that four or fewer joints are impacted.

What is the life expectancy of someone with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? ›

The mean age at death was 20.3 (range: 11-30) in JIA patients and 23.1 (range: 9-29) years in the control group, (p=0.17). Cumulative mortality in JIA was 0.6% (95% Cl 0.3-1.2) compared to 0.6% (95% Cl 0.4-1.0) in the controls; (hazard ratio 1.44, 95% Cl 0.70-2.95).

What does Pauciarticular mean? ›

pauciarticular (not comparable) (pathology) That affects few joints of the body.

Will juvenile rheumatoid arthritis go away? ›

Unlike adult rheumatoid arthritis, which is ongoing (chronic) and lasts a lifetime, children often outgrow JIA. But the disease can affect bone development in a growing child.

What triggers juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? ›

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis occurs when the body's immune system attacks its own cells and tissues. It's not known why this happens, but both heredity and environment seem to play a role.

Does methotrexate shorten your life? ›

Myth: Methotrexate can kill you or cause irreversible damage to the liver and other organs. At the doses used to treat RA, methotrexate side effects are rarely life-threatening. The likelihood of severe toxicity to the liver and other organs is low.

Is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis serious? ›

JIA often causes only minor problems, but in some cases it can cause serious joint damage or limit growth. Although JIA mostly affects the joints and surrounding tissues, it can also affect other organs, like the eyes, liver, heart, and lungs. JIA is a chronic condition, meaning it can last for months and years.

Is RA worse at night? ›

There is evidence that patients can identify different pain sensations at rest and on activity and that RA activity follows a circadian rhythm with worsening of the illness during the night.

Can juvenile rheumatoid arthritis come back? ›

JRA may cause fever and anemia, and can also affect the heart, lungs, eyes, and nervous system. Arthritic episodes can last for several weeks and may recur, although the symptoms tend to be less severe during later recurrent attacks.

Does JIA stunt growth? ›

Short stature in patients with JIA is usually due to reduced growth in the lower extremities, and only rarely due to reduced growth in the spinal column. In some studies, children with JIA were found to have infantile body proportions. Puberty is delayed in children with JIA.

Is Enthesitis an autoimmune disease? ›

Some kinds of arthritis are autoimmune disorders. This means your body's immune system makes chemicals that attack and damage your own tissues. This can cause enthesitis. It's a common symptom of two kinds of autoimmune arthritis -- psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

What are the major goals of therapy for the child with JIA? ›

The goals of JIA treatment are to:
  • Slow down or stop inflammation.
  • Relieve symptoms, control pain and improve quality of life.
  • Prevent joint and organ damage.
  • Preserve joint function and mobility.
  • Reduce long-term health effects.
  • Achieve remission (little or no disease activity or symptoms).

Is JRA genetic? ›

Most cases of juvenile idiopathic arthritis are sporadic, which means they occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family. A small percentage of cases of juvenile idiopathic arthritis have been reported to run in families, although the inheritance pattern of the condition is unclear.

Which activity is best suited to the 12 year old with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? ›

Which activity is best suited to the 12-year-old with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? 2. Answer: B. Swimming.

Is methotrexate worth the risk? ›

Methotrexate is one of the most effective and widely used medications for treating inflammatory types of arthritis. It's also one of the safest arthritis drugs, despite a common misconception among many patients that methotrexate is highly toxic.

Why should you not touch methotrexate? ›

Methotrexate and pregnancy

Even touching or inhaling the dust from the tablet can allow the medicine to get into the body. Methotrexate goes into sperm, so it's important that a man taking it doesn't get his partner pregnant.

What happens if you don't take folic acid with methotrexate? ›

You should take folic acid with methotrexate to help prevent a folate deficiency. Taking methotrexate can lower levels of folate in your body. A folate deficiency can lead to symptoms like upset stomach, low blood cell counts, tiredness, muscle weakness, mouth sores, liver toxicity and nervous system symptoms.

Is juvenile arthritis a disability? ›

The age of the child, the impact the condition is having on the child's life, and the income of the child's parents will also be considered. Even though SSA acknowledges juvenile arthritis as a disability, a person still needs to apply for benefits.

Does JIA affect fertility? ›

In a recent study of 75 Norwegian women with JIA, only 43% (n = 32) had a history of pregnancy compared with a rate of 59% in the general population, a 16% reduction in pregnancy rate [7]. Some studies also reported an increased rate of miscarriage or abortion in women with JIA [5].

How much sleep do RA patients need? ›

If you don't get enough shut-eye, your immune system can't perform this important function. It's especially important to get enough sleep if you have RA, because your immune system is already compromised. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourage adults to aim for seven to eight hours of sleep per night.

Do you get sick more often with rheumatoid arthritis? ›

When you have RA, you are more prone to catching viruses, like COVID-19 and others, and your symptoms may be more serious. Even certain medicines you take to manage RA symptoms may lower your body's ability to fight off infections.

Is rest good for rheumatoid arthritis? ›

It's important to try to stay physically active even during a flare, but rest is also especially important when RA is active and joints feel painful, swollen or stiff. Rest helps reduce inflammation and fatigue that can come with a flare. Taking breaks throughout the day protects joints and preserves energy.

Can JRA go into remission? ›

Treatments. Although there is no way to cure JRA, you can treat the symptoms, and your child's condition may go into remission, meaning that their symptoms get better or disappear. Once your child's disorder is diagnosed, your child's doctor can help you manage any pain or inflammation that your child may have.

What is Oligoarticular? ›

Medical Definition of oligoarticular

: affecting a few joints oligoarticular arthritis — compare monoarticular, polyarticular.

What is Monoarthritis? ›

Monoarthritis refers to the clinical presentation of pain or swelling in a single joint. 1. The diagnosis can pose a considerable challenge in the primary care setting because the pain may be limited to the joint, or it may represent early manifestation of a systemic disease.

Is enthesitis an autoimmune disease? ›

Some kinds of arthritis are autoimmune disorders. This means your body's immune system makes chemicals that attack and damage your own tissues. This can cause enthesitis. It's a common symptom of two kinds of autoimmune arthritis -- psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

What is Monoarticular? ›

Medical Definition of monoarticular

: affecting only one joint of the body acute monoarticular arthritis — compare oligoarticular, polyarticular.

PJRA is a previous term used for this condition, which is now known as oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (oligoarticular JIA).. Read on to learn more about oligoarticular JIA, including its symptoms, causes, and treatments.. A child with oligoarticular JIA will have up to four joints affected.. Experts call this form of JIA monoarticular juvenile arthritis.. Around 20–30% of children with oligoarticular JIA also develop eye inflammation , called uveitis .. A doctor may then refer the child to a pediatric or adult rheumatologist, a doctor specializing in arthritis treatment.. Additionally, the doctor may check the child’s eyes for signs of inflammation.. Blood tests for JIA can include:. Antinuclear antibody (ANA) test: This looks for the presence of ANAs within a person’s blood.. Oligoarticular JIA is a form of arthritis that affects children and is one of several subtypes of JIA.. Oligoarticular JIA causes inflammation in up to four joints in a child’s body, causing stiffness and pain.. Oligoarticular JIA can also cause eye inflammation, called uveitis.. To receive a diagnosis of oligoarticular JIA, a child needs to be under the age of 16 and experience inflammation for more than six weeks.. There is currently no known cause of oligoarticular JIA.. However, treatments for oligoarticular JIA can help to reduce symptoms.

PJRA is a previous term used for this condition, which is now known as oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (oligoarticular JIA).. A child with oligoarticular JIA will have up to four joints affected.. Oligoarticular JIA can also affect a child’s eyes.. Oligoarticular JIA occurs when a child’s immune system attacks the synovium of their joints.. Persistent oligoarticular JIA: This term is used when oligoarticular JIA continues to only affect four or fewer joints.. Extended oligoarticular JIA: This may develop six months after oligoarticular JIA symptoms begin.. A child with extended oligoarticular JIA will begin to feel oligoarticular JIA symptoms in more than four joints.. Extended oligoarticular JIA occurs in one-third of children who have oligoarticular JIA.. disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which suppress the immune system to prevent it from attacking a child’s joints nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs ), such as ibuprofen, to help relieve inflammation and pain biologic agents that work to slow the progression of JIA, although these are generally only used if DMARDs do not work corticosteroids, which is a stronger form of medication that doctors may use to treat more severe JIA. PJRA is an older term used to describe oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (oligoarticular JIA).. Oligoarticular JIA is a form of arthritis that affects children and is one of several subtypes of JIA.. Oligoarticular JIA causes inflammation in up to four joints in a child’s body, causing stiffness and pain.. A doctor may ask questions about the child’s medical history and pain when diagnosing oligoarticular JIA.

The symptoms of PJRA can vary depending on the child and on the joints affected.. Some children will have symptoms daily, but other children will only have symptoms during episodes or flare-ups of their PJRA.. swollen knee, shoulder, elbow, ankle, or other joints painful and stiff joints in the morning or after a nap difficulty using joints joints that are warm, red, or discolored decreased appetite fatigue eye inflammation trouble gaining weight. As a rule, PJRA can only be diagnosed in children who are under 16 years old, and who have been experiencing symptoms for at least 6 weeks.. Intraarticular glucocorticoid injections might reduce inflammation and treat pain for children with severe PJRA symptoms.. Children with PJRA might experience eye inflammation more often.. But treatment can help children with PJRA manage their symptoms and prevent complications.. Many children with PJRA are able to manage their symptoms, attend schools, and do other activities.. About half of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have PJRA.. PJRA occurs in children under 16 and can be managed with a combination of pain relieving medication and physical therapy.. Some children recover from PJRA without any complications, but other children might experience worsening symptoms as they get older.. But treatment may help children with PJRA manage their symptoms and improve how they complete daily tasks.

Two names for one condition Pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is an older name for a condition that is now sometimes called oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).. Pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (PJRA) is a form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).. Pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis vs. polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis PJRA is distinct from polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.. Some children will have symptoms daily, but other children will only have symptoms during episodes or flare-ups of their PJRA.. Intraarticular glucocorticoid injections might reduce inflammation and treat pain for children with severe PJRA symptoms.. About half of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have PJRA.. Some children recover from PJRA without any complications, but other children might experience worsening symptoms as they get older.. But treatment may help children with PJRA manage their symptoms and improve how they complete daily tasks.

The most common type of childhood arthritis is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), also called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).. The most common type of JRA is oligoarticular JRA (or pauciarticular JRA), which is at least half of the cases.. Very few children with JRA have a positive RF, and a positive RF in a child with JRA indicates an increased risk for symptoms continuing into adulthood, or a higher risk for developing RA as an adult.. Pauciarticular JRA Typically involving larger joints (i.e., knees), this is the most common type of JRA with up to four joints being affected.. Polyarticular JRA In the case of polyarticular JRA, approximately 30% of child patients are affected with at least five smaller joints (i.e., feet and hands) commonly involved.. Systemic JRA Sometimes referred to as Still's disease, this type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis can affect 20% of children with the condition.. Further, children with JRA also have an increased risk for osteoarthritis (wear and tear arthritis) due to JRA’s effects, medications used to treat JRA, an increased risk for injury and because of reduced physical activity.

Systemic Rheumatoid Arthritis, Enthesitis is not necessarily the joints but actually the tendon.. Oligoarticular is less than 8 years, Rhematoid Factor Negative is found in 8-12 years old and Rheumatoid Factor Positive occurs in greater than 13 years old.. Systemic can be any joint.. Systemic Rheumatoid Arthritis is difficult to diagnose because systemic symptoms may occur months before there are any joint involvement.. Psoriatic Arthritis.. Systemic Rheumatoid Arthritis, Enthesitis is not necessarily the joints but actually the tendon.. Oligoarticular is less than 8 years, Rhematoid Factor Negative is found in 8-12 years old and Rheumatoid Factor Positive occurs in greater than 13 years old.. Systemic can be any joint.. Systemic Rheumatoid Arthritis is difficult to diagnose because systemic symptoms may occur months before there are any joint involvement.. Psoriatic Arthritis.

Synonyms: Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA); Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA); Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (JCA).. ICD-9 Codes: Juvenile arthritis, 714.3; systemic juvenile arthritis, 714.3; polyarticular juvenile arthritis, 714.31; pauciarticular juvenile arthritis, 714.32.. Juvenile arthritis may be divided into four subsets that differ in their presentation (in the first 6 months) and outcomes: pauciarticular juvenile arthritis, juvenile spondylitis, polyarticular juvenile arthritis, and systemic-onset juvenile arthritis (Table 20).. Females are more commonly affected than males, with the exception of juvenile spondylitis (males predominate) and systemic juvenile arthritis (equally affected) (Table 20).. Table 20: Comparison of Juvenile Arthritis Subsets Pauciarticular-JuvenilePolyarticular-SystemicOnset JASpondylitisOnset JAOnset JAFrequency50%10%30%10%Onset age (y)1-109-163-163-16Female:male5:11:44:11:1Joint patternMono- or pauciarticularSacroiliitis or asymmetric oligoarthritisPolyarticular, symmetricPolyarticularExtraarticular featuresRarePsoriasis, enthesitis, inflammatory bowel diseaseRheumatoid nodules, weight lossFever, rash, lymphadenopathy, serositis, hepatosplenomegalyUveitis10%-50%10%RareRareLaboratory findingsRF (-), 85% ANA (+)50% are HLA-B27 (+)80% RF (-), 20% RF (+), 40% ANA (+)Leukocytosis, ESR > 50 mm/h, anemia, increased LFTs, negative ANA & RFPrognosisExcellent for joints; guarded for eyes?. Risk of spondylitis and uveitisSevere erosive arthritis in 50% of RF (-) patients50% develop chronic arthritis; 20% severe erosive arthritis Presentations and manifestations vary with each disease subset.. —Pauciarticular juvenile arthritis: This is the most common variety of juvenile arthritis, accounting for >50% of cases.. Patients with systemic juvenile arthritis may develop pleuritis, pericarditis, myocarditis, DIC, amyloidosis, or salicylate hepatotoxicity.Complications: Chronic nongranulomatous uveitis occurs in 10% to 50% of patients with pauciarticular disease.. All patients with pauciarticular and polyarticular juvenile arthritis should undergo slit-lamp examinations every 3 to 6 months to identify early inflammatory lesions.Cervical arthritis, especially C2-3 apophyseal fusion, may be seen in patients with pauciarticular, polyarticular, or systemic disease.Diagnostic Tests: There is no diagnostic laboratory test for JA.. Keys to Diagnosis: Juvenile arthritis should be suspected with development of a chronic (>6 weeks) inflammatory arthritis in a child.

Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (formerly called pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis or pauciarthritis) is a subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis that involves fewer than five joints.. Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most prevalent juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtype.. Persistent oligoarthritis: There is no additional joint involvement beyond the initial six months of illness and symptoms.. Extended oligoarthritis: Additional joint involvement occurs after the initial six months of illness and eventually more than four joints are involved.. The onset of oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis is much less common in children who are over 5 years old, and onset is rare in children who are 10 years of age or older.. Usually, with the onset of oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, there is asymmetric joint involvement that affects one or two large joints.. Up to 70% of children with oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis have a positive ANA test .. Remission (either partial or complete) of oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis can be achieved in most extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with the use of methotrexate.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis affects a significant number of children in the United States, and many of these patients will continue to need care for their condition after they no longer see a pediatric rheumatologist.. In a presentation at the Rheumatology Nurses Society annual meeting last month, Cathy Patty-Resk, MSN, RN, CPNP, a pediatric rheumatology nurse practitioner with the Children’s Hospital of Michigan, discussed the importance of helping adult rheumatologist understand the specifics of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.. “It’s important for adult clinicians to have a better understanding of this condition because there’s a common misconception that juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the same as rheumatoid arthritis.. When I talk to many adult providers, they don’t really understand how the condition is different from the rheumatoid arthritis they see.. What can help adult providers have a better understanding of how juvenile idiopathic arthritis is different?. “A lot of time adult providers get caught up on the classifications we have of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, such as pauciarticular, oligoarticular or polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis.. What are the misses or the traps that the adult provider could fall into during that first visit with a patient who has juvenile idiopathic arthritis?. It can be frustrating, but adult providers need to understand that, in the pediatric world, we don’t have access to all the same medications for arthritis that they do.. The nurse on the pediatric side can, during the transition phase, provide a lot of support to the young adult in explaining how the adult system works and helping them navigate it.. I encourage my young adult patients to call the adult office to schedule their appointment six months before I know I will be transferring care.. Are there other details about patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis that can help adult providers as they take over care?. For those young adults transitioning, one thing we commonly hear as patients transition to the adult world is a lack of understanding about how appointments work.

Videos

1. Recent advances in Polyarticular and Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis
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3. 95P What is Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, JRA, JIA
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4. JIA Stories - 1 - What is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis?
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5. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis for USMLE
(the study spot)
6. Polyarticular JIA |Rheumatology | 2022-2023 Pediatrics Video Board Review
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