PRP Therapy for Knee Pain 101: Review 2022 (2023)

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis. OA of the knee happens when the cartilage — the cushion between the knee joints — breaks down. This can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling.

There is no cure for OA of the knee, but treatment can help relieve discomfort and slow the damage. It can improve also your quality of life and help you better keep up with your day-to-day activities.

Your treatment options will depend on your individual needs. These include your medical history, level of pain, and the impact of OA on your daily life.

Treatment usually includes a combination of therapies and lifestyle choices.

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a novel treatment for managing pain related to osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Some PRP preparations have approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but approval does not yet cover the use of PRP in OA of the knee. Nevertheless, some clinics may offer it “off-label”.

Following is a review of the available effectiveness data taken from clinical, and real-world studies of PRP in knee Osteoarthritis.

PRP Therapy for Knee Pain 101: Review 2022 (1)

PRP Therapy for Knee Pain 101: Review 2022 (2)

PRP Studies for Knee Arthritis

Onestudyassessing PRP’s efficacy was a meta-analysis recently published in Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. For this systematic review, researchers queried MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science libraries through Feb. 8, 2017, and collected data from reviews, trials registries, and recent conferences. Studies eligible for inclusion were randomized trials published in English that compared platelet-rich therapy to a control, assessing patients aged ≥ 18 years with musculoskeletal bone, cartilage, or soft tissue injuries.

The final analysis included 78 randomized controlled trials with a total of 5,308 patients. The researchers considered a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.5 as the minimum for significant pain reduction. At three months, PRP was associated with reduced pain (SMD, –0.34; 95% CI, –0.48 to –0.20), which was also observed at one year (SMD, –0.60; 95% CI, –0.81 to –0.39). In lateral epicondylitis, evidence supporting PRP use was low- to moderate-quality (SMD, –0.69; 95% CI, –1.15 to –0.23) at one year; low- to moderate-quality one-year evidence also supported PRP use in knee OA (SMD, –0.91; 95% CI, –1.41 to –0.41).

Another study,published in the Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, evaluated PRP specifically in patients with knee OA. A total of 60 patients with chronic knee pain were randomized to receive 4 mL PRP intra-articularly (IA) in three doses once a week or one 4 mL dose of saline solution IA. Pain and functional outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), respectively, and ultrasonography (USG) was used to determine distal femur cartilage thickness.

After one month, the PRP group had significantly reduced VAS scores (P < 0.001) and WOMAC pain sub-scores. At six months, VAS scores remained low in the PRP group, and all WOMAC parameters were significantly lower compared to the placebo group. Cartilage thickness did not differ between the groups.

A thirdstudy,published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research, evaluated whether cartilage thickness played a role in outcomes for knee OA patients undergoing PRP therapy. This trial included 59 patients who underwent PRP with a low-leukocyte autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) system. Patients underwent MRI prior to treatment; researchers collected patients’ Whole-Organ MRI Score (WORMS), which determined knee OA level based on 14 parameters: integrity of the cartilage, affection of the bone marrow, subcortical cysts, bone attrition, osteophytes, integrity of the menisci and ligaments, presence of synovitis, loose bodies, and periarticular cysts.

Per the WORMS Cartilage Score, OA severity was classified as mild (20.3%), moderate (55.9%), and severe (23.7%). After PRP therapy, VAS scores decreased by 3.58 points, and WOMAC-Score decreased by 23.51 points. There were no significant differences in pain improvement based on OA level; the researchers concluded, “The findings of the current study suggest that positive effects of intra-articular injections of PRP might improve quality of life and reduce the pain of patients suffering from osteoarthritis of the knee joint independent from the level of cartilage damage.”

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PRP vs Hyaluronic Acid

There are 20 PRP studies that show superiority over hyaluronic acid:

  1. The comparison effects of intra-articular injection of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP), Plasma Rich in Growth Factor (PRGF), Hyaluronic Acid (HA), and ozone in knee osteoarthritis; a one year randomized clinical trial(BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2021)
  2. Clinical Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma Injection and Its Association With Growth Factors in the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Clinical Trial As Compared With Hyaluronic Acid(Am J Sports Med. 2021)
  3. Comparison of two platelet rich plasma formulations with viscosupplementation in treatment of moderate grade gonarthrosis: A prospective randomized controlled study(J Orthop. 2020)
  4. Single and double-dose of platelet-rich plasma versus hyaluronic acid for treatment of knee osteoarthritis: A randomized controlled trial(World J Orthop. 2019)
  5. The combined use of platelet rich plasma and hyaluronic acid: prospective results for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis(J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. 2019)
  6. Intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma, hyaluronic acid or corticosteroids for knee osteoarthritis : A prospective randomized controlled study(Orthopade. 2019)
  7. Intra-articular Injection of Platelet-Rich Plasma Is Superior to Hyaluronic Acid or Saline Solution in the Treatment of Mild to Moderate Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Triple-Parallel, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial(Arthroscopy. 2019)
  8. Platelet-Rich Plasma Versus Hyaluronic Acid Injections for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: Results at 5 Years of a Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial(Am J Sports Med. 2019)
  9. Clinical therapy of hyaluronic acid combined with platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of kneeosteoarthritis(Exp Ther Med. 2018)
  10. Clinical and radiographic comparison of a single LP-PRP injection, a single hyaluronic acid injection and daily NSAID administration with a 52-week follow-up: a randomized controlled trial(J Orthop Traumatol. 2018)
  11. Clinical outcomes are associated with changes in ultrasonographic structural appearance after platelet-rich plasma treatment for knee osteoarthritis(Int J Rheum Dis. 2018)
  12. Knee Osteoarthritis Injection Choices: Platelet- Rich Plasma (PRP) Versus Hyaluronic Acid(A one-year randomized clinical trial) (Clin Med Insights Arthritis Musculoskelet Disord 2015)
  13. Multiple PRP injections are more effective than single injections and hyaluronic acid in knees with early osteoarthritis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial(Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2017)
  14. Intra-Articular Injections of Platelet-Rich Plasma versus Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Osteoarthritic Knee Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial in the Context of the Spanish National HealthCare System(Int J Mol Sci. 2016)
  15. Randomized controlled trial comparing hyaluronic acid, platelet-rich plasma and the combination of both in the treatment of mild and moderate osteoarthritis of the knee(J Stem Cells Regen Med. 2016)
  16. Comparison of hyaluronic acid and PRP intra-articular injection with combined intra-articular and intraosseous PRP injections to treat patients with knee osteoarthritis(Clin Rheumatol. 2018)
  17. Growth Factors Levels Determine Efficacy of Platelets Rich Plasma Injection in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Double Blind Noninferiority Trial Compared With Viscosupplementation(Arthroscopy. 2018)
  18. Treatment of knee osteoarthritis: platelet-derived growth factors vs. hyaluronic acid. A
    randomized controlled trial(Clin Rehabil. 2018)
  19. Hyaluronic Acid Versus Platelet-Rich Plasma: A Prospective, Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Clinical Outcomes and Effects on Intra-articular Biology for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis(Am J Sports Med. 2017)
  20. Platelet rich plasma intra-articular and extra-articular injection for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis(Zhongguo Gu Shang. 2020)

PRP vs Steroid Injections

There are 5 PRP studies that show superiority over steroid injections:

  1. Intra-articular platelet-rich plasma vs corticosteroids in the treatment of moderate knee osteoarthritis: a single-center prospective randomized controlled study with a 1-year follow up(J Orthop Surg Res. 2020)
  2. Comparative Effect between Infiltration of Platelet-rich Plasma and the Use of Corticosteroids in the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Prospective and Randomized Clinical Trial(Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo). 2020)
  3. Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blinded Clinical Trial(Orthop J Sports Med. 2017)
  4. Comparison of Efficiency Between Corticosteroid and Platelet Rich Plasma Injection Therapies in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis(Arch Rheumatol. 2017)
  5. Single-dose intra-articular corticosteroid injection prior to platelet-rich plasma injection resulted in better clinical outcomes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: A pilot study(J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2018)

Are you a suitable candidate for PRP?

Research supports that PRP results in knee arthritis decline with severity. PRP works well with mild knee osteoarthritis.

Blood Draw Volume

PRP starts with a blood draw from your arm just like giving blood for a diagnostic test. While drawing blood isn’t rocket science, the volumes used here tell an expert quite a bit about the quality of the PRP that the clinic is capable of producing. Why?

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Let’s say you’re getting your knee treated at age 50. You show up at the clinic and they take 1 tube of blood to make the PRP. That’s usually about 10 ml.

Your knee will usually take 2-3 ml of PRP. Half of that volume will be wasted, so the PRP that comes out of that process will be at best 2 times more concentrated than the normal platelet concentration in your blood. Hence, without even knowing which PRP kit the clinic is using, since your knee will require at least 10-14X concentration for a real PRP treatment, we know that the clinic is producing inadequate PRP. To get to 2 ml of a 14X PRP, the clinic would have had to take about 6 tubes of blood or 60 ml.

PRP Processing

That blood taken from your arm now needs to be processed to make PRP. How that happens is critical. 99% of the time, the doctor has bought a kit that goes into a simple bedside centrifuge.

There are literally more PRP kits for sale nowadays. Each produces a completely different PRP product. Some of these kits produce junk PRP and some produce high-quality PRP. How would you know?

The other way PRP is processed is through an onsite lab. This could be a very bad or good thing. For example, on the bad side, an improperly run and supervised on-site lab may introduce bacterial contamination or make a bad PRP product. Having said that, a properly supervised and run lab can produce better quality PRP products in more variety than any PRP kit on the market.

PRP Types

There are two main types of PRP and you can tell them by their color-red and amber. Red PRP contains lots of white and red blood cells and is called “Leukocyte Rich” (LR-PRP). Amber PRP has few white and red blood cells, so it’s called “Leukocyte Poor” (LP-PRP).

The workhorse of modern PRP use is the amber LP-PRP. Why? While the research bounces back and forth on this one, right now, we have more evidence that amber LP-PRP is more effective for common everyday uses like knee arthritis and tendon problems. However, every rule in medicine has an exception. For the injection of spinal discs (and NOT other areas in the spine), high-dose LR-PRP, based on recent research is likely safer because it helps fight the bacteria that could cause a nasty side effect called discitis.

So unless you’re getting your disc injected, you want the PRP to be amber in color.

PRP Dose

PRP Therapy for Knee Pain 101: Review 2022 (3)
Credit: Regenexx.com

There is nothing in medicine that gets away from the concept of dose. Meaning, if you give the patient the right dose, they get better. If you give the wrong dose, there is no effect. PRP is NO EXCEPTION.

We have tested the concept that the dose of PRP needed is age-dependent numerous times. Meaning younger patients can get by with lower doses. Older patients need much higher doses. How do I know this?

Take our recent published study on tenocytes (tendon cells). When we exposed young tenocytes to PRP they maxed out their ability to heal at low concentrations. However, when old tenocytes were exposed to PRP, the ability to heal was stimulated by a direct dose-response relationship. In other words, the higher the PRP concentration, the more lab-based evidence of healing we observed.

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Hence, if you’re young (under the age of 35), you probably don’t need to worry about the PRP dose. However, if you’re middle-aged or older, this is a VERY BIG DEAL that can make the difference between a failed and successful treatment. How high should that dose be?

Based on our published research, if you’re older, this is what we recommend:

  • 35-50’s-7-10X PRP
  • 50’s-70’s-14X PRP
  • 70’s or older-20X PRP


PRP Re-injection

PRP Therapy for Knee Pain 101: Review 2022 (4)

Where the PRP is placed is CRITICAL. Meaning if you want to promote healing in a specific structure, you MUST get the PRP accurately inside that structure.

There are a number of categories here:

  • Simple Blind Injections-This means the doctor just pokes the needle in the general vicinity of where it needs to go without using imaging guidance. This is BELOW the current standard of care.
  • Simple Ultrasound-guided Injections-The doctor uses an ultrasound machine to guide the needle into an easy to access space like the inside of the knee joint (intra-articular).
  • Complex Ultrasound-Guided injections-The doctor is able to use ultrasound to perform more complex injections into specific tendons and ligaments.
  • Complex Dual Modality Imaging Injections-The doctor uses both ultrasound and fluoroscopy (x-ray guidance) to be able to perform complex injections in places where ultrasound has poor imaging abilities.

Ideally, you want a clinic that can use dual-mode imaging and that knows how to use that to place the PRP anywhere it needs to go in the body. Be a bit careful here, as some places have both of these modalities, but don’t know how to use them at a high level.

PRP Knee Treatment Cost

The Washington Postreports that knee injections of PRP can cost anywhere from $500 to $1,200 per treatment.

According to theAmerican Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, very few insurance plans will provide any reimbursement for PRP injections. The costs must largely be paid out-of-pocket. The costs can also vary from location to location and on how the injections are used.

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Insurance companies consider PRP an experimental treatment. More scientific research will have to conclude its effectiveness before it is more widely covered.

Some PRP treatments for knee are also done in combination with add on hyaluronic acid injection.

Hyaluronic acid injection serves to supplement your own hyaluronic acid and keep the bones from scraping against each other. It may also help decrease inflammation and ease pain.

The following medications are types of hyaluronic acid injections:

  • sodium hyaluronate (Euflexxa, Hyalgan, Supartz)
  • high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (Monovisc, Orthovisc)
  • hylan G-F 20 (Synvisc, Synvisc One)
  • cross-liked hyaluronate (Gel-One)

PRP vs Stem Cell Therapy for Knee

There is no one size fits all treatment. There are many options available. On one side of the spectrum are non-invasive strategies such as losing weight and appropriate physical therapy to strengthen your muscles and to have proper walking, standing and sitting habits. In the middle you will have less invasive strategies such as injectables i.e. PRP, steroids, stem cells etc. On the other end of the spectrum are invasive surgical treatments such as bone realignment surgery and total knee replacement (TKR).

PRP might be suitable for stage 1 and 2 knee osteoarthritis and stem cells for stage 2 and 3. Stem cell therapy might not work for Stage 4 knee osteoarthritis.

Discuss with your doctor and choose the least invasive method to begin with.

Key Takeaway

We hope you’ve gained the ability now to separate the poor quality clinics that are not a good value from the high-quality clinics that can deliver a much better product.

(Video) Weak Muscles Around Knee Lead to Arthritis

Being a consumer of high-quality healthcare these days takes lots of homework. We hope this guide to high-quality PRP injections helps you find a clinic that has all of the tools needed to help you recover!

FAQs

Is PRP worth it for knee pain? ›

When it comes to PRP for knees, studies have shown that some types of platelet-rich plasma treatment may be effective in improving low- to moderate-grade knee osteoarthritis. Some studies have found that platelet-rich plasma injections significantly reduced pain compared to placebos.

What is the success rate of PRP injections for knees? ›

This study revealed that the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma therapy for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis is approximately 60% and that the effectiveness depends on the severity of knee osteoarthritis. This observation is useful not only for physicians but also for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

How many PRP treatments are needed for knee pain? ›

PRP can be effective in relieving pain and function in patients with early osteoarthritis by decreasing the inflammation in the knee and by promoting restoration of damaged cartilage. If PRP treatment is being administered, three consecutive PRP injections spaced two weeks apart gives the best results.

How long does it take PRP injection in knee to work? ›

How long does it take for PRP injections to work? The benefits of PRP injections may take between four and six weeks to be noticeable to the patient.

Can PRP regrow knee cartilage? ›

PRP regrows damaged tissue

The PRP accelerates and boosts healing, so your body can actually repair significant amounts of damage that it can't handle by itself. Research has shown that PRP can actually help you regenerate cartilage that's been degraded by osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

Can you walk after PRP injection? ›

Rest for the first 24-48 hours, but do not lie sedentary. We encourage light movement and range of motion after your injections. Use crutches or a walker for a lower extremity joint, and a sling if necessary for shoulders. You should gradually increase activities using discomfort as a guideline.

How long does PRP last in knees? ›

Clinical studies have shown that PRP injections can be effective for up to nine months.

Can PRP replace knee replacement? ›

Fortunately, PRP is an option that is supported by quality research, and according to the evidence, can lead to a delay in Total Joint Replacement in the majority of patients as well as improvements in pain and function. PRP is also less likely to cause side effects than surgical alternatives.

Can PRP make pain worse? ›

Most patients who receive PRP for joint and tendon injuries can experience increased pain as part of their recovery process. It happens because PRP triggers acute inflammation as an initial healing response.

Does PRP heal tendon tears? ›

Thus far, numerous basic science studies have shown the beneficial effects of PRP in healing tendon injuries. Specifically, growth factors in PRP have significantly enhanced the healing of tendon injuries such as tendinopathy [21–24].

Is a PRP injection worth it? ›

So far, research shows that it speeds healing after injury or surgery for certain conditions, like torn tendons. In addition to helping injured tissue heal, some studies show PRP injections curb pain and boost mobility for people with rotator cuff injuries.

How many PRP injections are needed for meniscus tear? ›

Three sequential injections in seven-day intervals were performed in every patient. Four of ten patients (40%) showed a decrease of the meniscal lesion in follow-up MRI after six months. Six of ten patients (60%) showed Improvement of NRS-Score at the final follow-up.

Can you walk after a knee injection? ›

It is recommended that you refrain from any high level activities using your knee for approximately 48 hours. Routine activities including walking are permitted. The most commonly reported side effects are temporary pain, swelling and/or fluid accumulation in the injected knee.

Why does my knee hurt after PRP? ›

After your treatment, there is a chance you'll experience some mild to moderate pain or discomfort at the injection site. This is normal, and it is a sign that your body is healing as it adjusts to the injection. It is best to stay hydrated and drink plenty of water to help promote healing.

Why is PRP not working? ›

PRP therapy is less likely to work if your hair loss is due to a condition that causes scarring of the scalp, such as lupus. Once scarring has occurred, hair follicles typically can't be reactivated.

Can I walk after PRP injection in my knee? ›

There is usually no specific rest period required after a knee PRP injection. Meaning you can walk around right after the injection. Bracing or crutches would not usually be required.

Can PRP heal meniscus tear? ›

In the case of more severe injuries like a meniscus tear, PRP alone may not be enough to heal the injured tissue. While PRP injections might help manage the symptoms of pain and diminished function, it may not provide for complete healing of a meniscal tear.

Does PRP regenerate meniscus? ›

PRP allows the meniscus to repair itself quickly and completely after surgery. Studies show that the growth factors in PRP provide a good outcome after surgery, with better recovery rates and more meniscus retained.

Should I wear a knee brace after PRP? ›

A: The brace needs to be worn during the 4 to 6 week period after your injection while you're weight bearing, including and especially during exercise. You do not need to wear it while on a stationary bike, as it is not a weight bearing activity.

Will I need crutches after PRP injection in knee? ›

Phase 1 (0-3 days post procedure) – In the days following PRP injection, the primary goals will be to protect the affected joint and manage discomfort. The joint may be immobilized using a sling or a walking boot. If you receive injections in your knee, foot or ankle, you may be advised to use crutches.

Who should not get PRP? ›

While PRP is considered safe for most people, it's not recommended for anyone who has one of the following medical conditions: Hepatitis C. HIV or AIDS. Any type of blood cancer.

Can PRP help bone on bone knee? ›

Overall, 60% of patients had good outcomes with PRP and less knee pain. Another study suggests a 70% improvement in knee pain after PRP treatments. In one paper – long-term meaningful results were seen in 85% of patients in knee pain after PRP treatments.

How long should you rest after PRP injection? ›

You can move around to do light tasks around the house and work, however, doctors typically recommend that you rest the treated area for at least 2 weeks. You should avoid excessive activities that can strain the damaged ligament and interfere with the healing.

How do you know if PRP is working? ›

Depending on your condition, you should see results between 2-6 weeks after receiving a PRP injection. Mild injuries or chronic pain cases typically see results within the first two weeks, while more serious injuries won't be able to appreciate the healing until around a month has passed.

What is the newest knee injection? ›

The FDA has approved a single-injection hyaluronic acid gel (Durolane – Bioventus) and an extended-release (ER) formulation of the synthetic corticosteroid triamcinolone acetonide (Zilretta – Flexion) for intra-articular (IA) treatment of osteoarthritic knee pain.

Is PRP better than knee replacement? ›

Injections of platelet-rich plasma are no better than placebo for helping reduce knee pain in people with knee joint osteoarthritis, an Australian clinical trial led by researchers at the University of Melbourne, University of Sydney and Monash University has found.

Is PRP FDA approved 2022? ›

Although the equipment used to produce PRP and the injections themselves have been cleared by the FDA, this procedure is considered investigational and has not been officially approved by the FDA for most uses. Since PRP is a substance derived from one's own blood, it is not considered a drug.

What are the disadvantages of PRP treatment? ›

The Side Effects Post-PRP
  • Dizziness.
  • Nausea.
  • Scalp pain.
  • Irritation during the healing process.
  • Scar tissue at the injection site.
  • Injury to blood vessels.
  • Injury to nerves.

Why is PRP so painful? ›

Platelets release many chemicals that summon or call other reparative cells to the area of injury. When the platelets release their chemicals, it causes an inflammatory response. This inflammation is also why PRP injections into the tendons, muscles, and ligaments will hurt.

Can PRP cause blood clots? ›

Blood Clot

Because a PRP injection uses a needle (guided by a sonogram) there is a chance that a artery or vein could be damaged. If that happens a blood clot occurs and is treated like any normal clot.

Does PRP strengthen ligaments? ›

A number of basic studies have demonstrated that PRP can increase both the number of cells and the cellular component by enhancing fibroblast proliferation and collagen production, and thus strengthen healed tendons and ligaments15,17,100,101.

Can PRP work on an older injury? ›

PRP can also aid in healing and keep inflammation in check after certain surgeries. For most patients, it's never too late to use PRP. Significant results can be achieved even with old injuries and arthritis.

How sore is tendon after PRP? ›

If you have a tendon, ligament, or muscle treated with PRP, you may feel sore a bit longer — more like seven to 10 days. During the next two to six weeks, your body continues to heal itself.

What is the success rate of PRP? ›

PRP is not to be seen as a standalone treatment method to overcome hair loss woes. When administered in conjunction with medicines and other topical treatments, it has shown to be successful among 70% patients, to whom it is administered.

Who is a good candidate for PRP? ›

Often, PRP is suggested once other types of treatments, like physical therapy, have proven ineffective in providing adequate relief. While PRP therapy can benefit many people, the best candidates tend to be those with early- to mid-stage disease with overall good health.

Does Medicare cover PRP injections 2022? ›

Platelet-Rich Plasma Injection is not covered under Medicare.

How effective is PRP for meniscus? ›

Percutaneous injections of PRP have the ability to achieve pain relief and halt of progression on MRI over 6 months in patients with grade 2 meniscal lesions. In the present study 60% of patients showed a significant improvement of NRS score and increase of sports activity after injection.

Do knee injections help torn meniscus? ›

An injection does not heal the tear but does reduce the pain and inflammation in the joint. An injection can give you a pain-free window to work with your physiotherapist to strengthen the knee and restore the normal mechanics of the joint.

Should you exercise after PRP? ›

Can you exercise after PRP injections? When having PRP therapy applied as a topical serum for skin concerns, it is likely that your provider will recommend avoiding strenuous physical activity and exercise for about 48 – 72 hours after treatment.

What are the negatives of PRP? ›

What are the potential side effects of PRP?
  • infection.
  • nerve injuries.
  • pain at the injection site.
  • tissue damage.

Is PRP worth the money? ›

In our experience, PRP micro-needling has been worth it for most of our patients. Although it is not as effective as hair transplants, and you can save a bit of money trying less intrusive treatments like Rogaine and Propecia, PRP can still help reverse the devastating effects of premature hair loss.

Is plasma therapy good for knee pain? ›

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentrate of autologous blood growth factors. PRP has been shown to provide some symptomatic relief in knee osteoarthritis. To date, this intervention has been largely delivered in hospital settings. This study has shown that it is feasible to deliver PRP therapy in primary care.

Does PRP help torn meniscus? ›

PRP for Meniscus Injuries

Meniscus tear treatment with PRP is very effective. Because the deep meniscus has no blood flow, injections of PRP allow the platelets access to the injury. If the injections are fully effective, they can even replace surgery.

Can PRP go wrong? ›

Why Does PRP Fail? In our extensive clinical experience, sometimes PRP shots are just a bad fit for the problem being treated. For example, PRP can produce great results when used to treat mild knee arthritis, but can often fail when used to treat moderate or severe arthritis.

Can PRP cause blood clots? ›

Blood Clot

Because a PRP injection uses a needle (guided by a sonogram) there is a chance that a artery or vein could be damaged. If that happens a blood clot occurs and is treated like any normal clot.

Is PRP FDA approved 2022? ›

Although the equipment used to produce PRP and the injections themselves have been cleared by the FDA, this procedure is considered investigational and has not been officially approved by the FDA for most uses. Since PRP is a substance derived from one's own blood, it is not considered a drug.

How long does PRP knee treatment last? ›

Clinical studies have shown that PRP injections can be effective for up to nine months.

Who is a good candidate for PRP? ›

Often, PRP is suggested once other types of treatments, like physical therapy, have proven ineffective in providing adequate relief. While PRP therapy can benefit many people, the best candidates tend to be those with early- to mid-stage disease with overall good health.

Why do insurance companies not cover PRP? ›

Most insurance providers do not cover it at all. Clinics that offer PRP consider it a “fee for service” type of treatment. The main reason insurance companies are reluctant, at the present time anyway, to cover the treatment is that there has not been enough testing.

Can PRP replace knee replacement? ›

Fortunately, PRP is an option that is supported by quality research, and according to the evidence, can lead to a delay in Total Joint Replacement in the majority of patients as well as improvements in pain and function. PRP is also less likely to cause side effects than surgical alternatives.

What should you not do before PRP? ›

At least five days before your procedure, discontinue anti-inflammatory medications. One week before your procedure, discontinue any blood thinning herbs or supplements. One to two weeks before your procedure, discontinue systematic steroids. At least one month before your procedure, discontinue steroid injections.

How long should you rest after PRP injection? ›

You can move around to do light tasks around the house and work, however, doctors typically recommend that you rest the treated area for at least 2 weeks. You should avoid excessive activities that can strain the damaged ligament and interfere with the healing.

How many PRP injections are needed for meniscus tear? ›

Three sequential injections in seven-day intervals were performed in every patient. Four of ten patients (40%) showed a decrease of the meniscal lesion in follow-up MRI after six months. Six of ten patients (60%) showed Improvement of NRS-Score at the final follow-up.

Does PRP Work ACL tear? ›

Platelet-Rich-Plasma (PRP) provides certain growth factors that could improve healing and therefore, clinical outcomes after partial ACL tears.

How can I regenerate my meniscus naturally? ›

Steps to heal a torn meniscus naturally:
  1. Rest: It's crucial to rest your knee after injury. ...
  2. Ice: Apply ice to your knee for 15 minutes at four-hour intervals.
  3. Compression: To help reduce swelling, you should keep something on your leg.

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Introduction: My name is Ms. Lucile Johns, I am a successful, friendly, friendly, homely, adventurous, handsome, delightful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.