The 6 Best Recumbent Cross Trainers For Home Use – Your Comprehensive Guide - The Home Gym (2022)

The 6 Best Recumbent Cross Trainers For Home Use – Your Comprehensive Guide - The Home Gym (1)

Recumbent cross trainers have been popular in the rehab setting for a long time because they offer a safe, comfortable way to strengthen your legs and improve cardiovascular health.

This is often a challenging task right after surgery or for people with mobility issues. This is why these machines can be found in almost every rehab clinic around the country.

Turns out you no longer have to go to therapy to reap the rewards from recumbent trainers. Nowadays, manufacturers are producing machines designed specifically for home use.

This is great news for the people out there that have a hard time exercising due to physical limitations. Instead of having to go out to therapy or find someone to take you to the local gym, you can purchase a recumbent trainer and exercise safely in the comfort of your own home.

But, like any other fitness equipment, you need to know what to look for before making a purchase.

Doing your research is the best way to reduce your chances of buying a lemon. Luckily, you’ve come to the right place!

My guide is here to teach you everything you need to know about recumbent trainers, including what you should look for and how to compare different models.

I’ve also included my top picks for the trainers available for home use.

Let’s start from the beginning.

What Is A Recumbent Cross Trainer?

If you’ve accidentally stumbled across this article or aren’t exactly sure what counts as a recumbent trainer, let’s make sure we’re all talking about the same thing here.

A recumbent cross trainer, or recumbent trainer, or recumbent elliptical trainer, or recumbent stepper is a combination of a recumbent bike and an elliptical trainer.

The seat resembles the large, comfortable seat associated with recumbent bikes. But instead of pedaling like you do on a bike, you are pushing large pedals back and forth with your feet.

You also get to use handles for your arms, just like most ellipticals let you do. This is great because you can effectively get a full body workout while sitting comfortably on a large seat with backrest.

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If you’ve never heard of a recumbent trainer, you may have heard of the NuStep, the first (and most popular) recumbent trainer.

It came out in the late ’90s and was designed by a bio-medical engineer and an exercise science guy from Michigan State. The goal was to create a safe cardio machine for people who had had cardiac surgery.

It was marketed to physical therapy clinics and rehab settings and the rest is history. You can find a NuStep in pretty much every therapy clinic these days, and for good reason- they work very well.

NuSteps are awesome, but they are also very expensive. They claim they have “home models”, but their most affordable machine is about $4000. If you have the money, you can’t go wrong with a NuStep. Their biggest flaw is their steep asking price.

When I think of home exercise equipment, I think of equipment that is usually a little more affordable.

I was actually inspired to write this article after a discussion I had with one of my patients. For those of you who aren’t aware, I’m a physical therapist in my day job.

I do home health- that’s where I travel to my patient’s houses and treat them in the comfort of their homes.

Anyway, my patient had recently had a total hip replacement and was talking about how much he loved using the NuStep at therapy before his surgery.

He wanted to purchase one for his home, but was disappointed when he saw how much they cost. He asked me if I knew of any cheaper options…

I said I would look into it for him and the idea for this article was born.

Long-story-short, yes, there are more affordable options available. And yes, some of them have a lot to offer and are worth buying.

And yes, you guessed it- those elliptical trainers worth buying are the ones I’ve reviewed below.

How To Choose A Recumbent Cross Trainer

When it comes to recumbent trainers, the options aren’t quiet as vast as they are with recumbent bikes or ellipticals. Searching online, you may only come up with a handful of options for home use.

This definitely makes the search a little easier. You may even be able to use price alone, depending on your budget.

Even so, it’s always a good idea to know what you should expect when comparing these machines. Here are a few key characteristics I suggest you examine during your search.

Use this info as a guide and make sure to compare these features among the different recumbent trainers you are considering.

Seat

The seats on recumbent trainers are always a little larger and they always have a backrest. Some seats will have an adjustable recline setting, which is a nice feature to have because it allows you to customize your position more.

(Video) Joint Pain Relief & Cardio Using a Recumbent Cross Trainer

Some seats may also offer arm rests- this can add comfort if you are exercising your legs only and not utilizing the arm handles.

The nicest seat feature found on some recumbent trainers is the ability to swivel. On these machines, you can release a lever and the seat rotates 90 deg to the side.

This makes it a lot easier to get in and out of and is especially helpful if you have mobility issues or are transferring from a wheelchair.

All of the NuSteps offer this feature, some of the competitors do too. Just a heads up though, trainers with swiveling seats are more expensive.

Pedal Motion

The motion of the foot pedals is something else to consider. The motion can be linear (like a stepper) or have a circular pattern that more closely mimics the motion of an elliptical machine.

It may not make much difference to you and you may not even really notice, but technically speaking a linear motion would provide the lowest impact workout.

If you have severe arthritis you may want to look for a machine with a linear pedaling motion to ensure as little impact as possible.

Features

You probably shouldn’t expect all the fancy bells and whistles you see on other types of fitness equipment. These machines are usually pretty simple.

The console usually just displays metrics like steps, time, distance.

Some nicer machines might calculate METs (metabolic equivalents) or watts, but you shouldn’t expect a lot of bluetooth functions with fitness app tracking (although some machines do offer this).

Most trainers will offer workout programs, but the number and sophistication of them will vary. Keep in mind these machines are designed for people who usually just want to hop on and ride.

Other important built-in features to look for include:

  • Walk-through frames- makes getting on/off easier
  • Adjustable handle bars- makes it easier to ensure the right fit for anyone
  • Adjustable resistance levels to accommodate users of any fitness level
  • Heart rate monitor compatibility

Weight Capacity

Like any type of fitness equipment, it’s always a good idea to consider the weight capacity of the trainer you are considering. It needs to at least safely fit you or any family member that might be exercising on it.

If stuck between two options, always go with the machine with the higher weight capacity, it indicates superior strength and durability.

Recumbent trainers usually have weight capacities that are higher than other types of equipment. Nice trainers will start at 300 lb capacities and go as high as 600 lb.

Warranty

Last, but not least, is warranty. Always consider the warranty when making a recumbent trainer purchase. More expensive models tend to have higher warranties, but that rule is not written in stone.

These machines typically have warranties that are divided into frame, parts, and labor.

Labor is always the shortest warranty, typically 1-2 years.

Parts warranties usually vary between 3-5 years depending on the model.

Frame should be the longest, because it’s the part that is least likely to fail. Good frame warranties can range between 5 years to lifetime.

The 6 Best Recumbent Cross Trainers For Home Use

#1 Teeter FreeStep LT1 Recumbent Cross Trainer – Most Budget Friendly

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Image courtesy of Teeter

This cross trainer by Teeter is one of the most highly-rated trainers you can find online. It’s also the most affordable. The first thing you might notice about the Teeter FreeStep is that it’s actually pretty compact.

This is great if your workout space is limited and every inch counts. A downside to a lot of these machines is that they do take up a good amount of floorspace.

The seat on this trainer is a little smaller than some of the more expensive models and there are no arm rests. The recline setting of the backrest is adjustable to help keep you more comfortable during your workout.

Unfortunately, the seat doesn’t swivel- and I’m not surprised, it would be pretty impossible for a trainer this affordable to include a high-end feature like that.

The Teeter FreeStep utilizes a liner step motion, similar to performing a step machine while sitting comfortably. This pattern should limit the stress through your hips and knees as much as possible.

The handles are large and do offer some grip variety that can allow you to emphasize certain upper body muscle groups during your workout.

When it comes to features, the FreeStep doesn’t offer a lot. It has adjustable handle bars and a small LCD display that shows your workout stats. It also has a water bottle holder and a small shelf on the display where you can place a smart phone.

This recumbent trainer has a max weight capacity of 300 lb. This is on the lower side of our expected range, but still respectable.

Especially considering the price. Considering the smaller footprint and lower weight capacity, the FreeStep may be better suited for smaller users- that said, 300 lb will still fit most users.

(Video) Beginner's Guide: Recumbent Bike

The warranty department is where the FreeStep really falls short in my book. Teeter only offers a 1 year warranty on this trainer. There’s just no getting around it, this is an awful warranty.

Users all seem to agree the machine is well-built and feels sturdy during use…but only 1 year?

Overall, the Teeter FreeStep is a good choice if you are on a tighter budget. It’s designed with a compact footprint and still offers most of the sought after qualities the more expensive machines offer.

In my opinion, the only place where this trainer is really lacking is in the warranty department. For the price though, there’s no better option. See full review.

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#2 Spirit CRS800S Recumbent Stepper- Best High End

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Photo courtesy of Fitness Factory

If you’re working with a slightly higher budget and looking for a recumbent trainer that can stand toe to toe with most commercial machines, Spirit’s CRS800S is a safe bet.

And what makes this model commercial grade?

For starters, the CRS800S is heavy-duty and easily accessible. When it comes to the frame, this machine is tough enough to handle users weighing up to 450 lb, allowing it to hold smaller and larger folks alike.

This steppers weighs 262 lb itself, which is quite substantial for a home fitness machine.

One of the nicest features on it is the over-sized seat that comes with a reclinable back rest. The seat also swivels, making it easy to get in/out of, regardless of any mobility issues you may have (and there are adjustable arm rests too).

It also has a low, walk-through frame that makes it easy to access from either side.

The CRS800S utilizes a very linear pedal motion, making for a comfortable exercise experience for all. The pedals are large and cushioned and the handles are multi-grip and adjustable.

The console is pretty simple, but it’s easy to use and does come with 10 or so built-in workout programs.

And if you’re a sucker for a great warranty like me, you’ll love this- the CRS800s comes with one one of the best warranties you’ll ever find:

  • Lifetime frame
  • 10 year parts
  • 2 year labor

Yeah, 10 years on parts…crazy.

Overall, if you’re looking for a commercial grade recumbent cross trainer that can hold it’s own with NuStep, Spirit’s CRS800S is worth considering. See full review.

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#3 Inspire Fitness CS3 Cardio Strider – Most Bang For The Buck

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The CS3 Cardio Strider is kind of priced in the mid-range between the Teeter and the higher-end trainers like NuStep. With the extra money you get some pretty significant upgrades- more advanced console, nicer seat, and a more serious warranty.

This machine is priced well and has everything it needs to make it a great choice for a home trainer.

The seat on the CS3 is a little larger than the one on the Teeter, but it still doesn’t have arm rests or swivel. It too is recline adjustable with 3 positions. The frame isn’t quite walk-through, but the step through height is pretty low, making it easy to access.

The handles are adjustable and offer multiple grips to customize your upper body workout. You can also rotate them easily to match the position you need. This comes in handy when you are emphasizing your arms- after all, these machines do offer a full body workout.

The CS3 also utilizes a pretty linear pedal motion, good for reducing stress through your joints. This trainer has stationary foot rests you can park your feet on if you want to isolate your arms.

You can also place your arms on stationary handlebars if you want to isolate your legs.

I mentioned the console is a lot more sophisticated, that might be an understatement. It’ much larger, it’s blue backlit and it comes with 10 preset workout programs.

It also offers 20 different resistance levels, enough to challenge you regardless of your fitness level.

And not only is the CS3 heart rate monitor compatible, it comes with a Polar chest strap monitor!

The max weight capacity on this trainer is 300 lb, same as the Teeter. Should be enough to fit most users comfortably, but if you require a higher weight capacity this isn’t the right machine for you.

(Video) 9 Best Recumbent Exercise Bike 2022 You Buy For Home

The warranty offered by Inspire Fitness is pretty awesome. They offer the following warranty on the CS3 Cardio Strider:

  • Lifetime frame
  • 5 year parts
  • 1 year labor

This is actually one of the best warranties I came across while doing my research for this article. If I remember correctly, it even beats out NuStep. If you’re looking for a recumbent trainer that is built to last, this could be the one for you.

Overall, the CS3 has a ton to offer. With several workout programs to choose from and 20 levels of resistance, getting a good workout won’t be a concern.

And if you are worried, Inspire Fitness is throwing in a heart rate monitor to ensure you are working at your desired intensity. The CS3 offers a great combination between features and price- it’s definitely earned it’s way on this list.

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#4 Octane Fitness xR6xi Recumbent Elliptical – Most Hi-Tech

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Octane Fitness offers several different recumbent trainer models with the xR6’s being the most advanced home units. This machine offers a level of luxury most of the others simply can’t.

I like the xR6xi because it looks like something you would see in your local gym. The design is very inviting- but you know what they say, you can’t judge a book by it’s cover…luckily in this case, the content is just as impressive.

Starting with the seat, you’ll notice that’s it’s large. You’ll also notice the large lever right below the seat- this makes adjusting the height easy and accessible.

You can also adjust the recline setting here, but unlike the other trainers that simply changes the backrest angle, this one actually tilts the entire seat/backrest combo. The result is a more comfortable position to operate.

The handlebars are large with plenty of grip options- this makes working out more comfortable and allows for specific muscle isolation.

The pedal motion on the xR6xi is a little more circular than some of the other machines we’ve discussed. Not as circular as a traditional elliptical, but more so than a purely linear motion.

Octane Fitness claims this helps you activate your glutes more- I’m not sure about that, but users agree it feels smooth and comfortable to use.

This recumbent trainer is loaded with features. Easily the most features we’ve seen thus far. Key features include:

  • Compatible with Octane Fitness app for fitness tracking and more workouts
  • Compatible with Polar and ANT+ heart rate monitors
  • Polar chest strap included!
  • 9 preprogrammed workouts
  • “Workout boosters” to help you isolate certain muscle groups and burn more calories during your workouts
  • Multicolor “smart light” gives you visual cues of your workout intensity and helps you stay within your zone

The xR6xi also has a 300 lb weight limit. Their commercial grade machines go up to 400 lb. Either way, this trainer is built solid enough to hold up to intense workouts.

And in the case that something does go wrong, Octane Fitness is backing this machine up with one impressive warranty:

  • Lifetime frame
  • 5 year parts
  • 1 year labor

Overall, I’m really impressed with the xR6xi (and all of Octane Fitness’s recumbent ellipticals). It has by far the most advanced features of any of the trainers discussed thus far and it comes with an awesome warranty to back it up.

I also like that it actually looks like it’s fun to use and not like it should be found in a therapy clinic (no offense NuStep).

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#5 HCI Fitness PhysioStep LXT Recumbent Cross Trainer – Most Accessible

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HCI is another company that offers an impressive recumbent trainer lineup. Impressive enough to give NuStep a run for their money even.

The LXT looks a little more “rehaby” and doesn’t have all the cool console features like the xR6xi, but it does have something no other trainer listed so far does…a swivel seat.

Yup, this trainer does come with a swivel seat. And this is a game changer for folks who are transferring from a wheelchair or who have mobility issues that make it difficult to step over the frame to get in.

Turning the seat away from the pedals gives you a lot more room to get on and eliminates the need to step over the pedals to get in.

The LXT has a linear pedal motion that provides a natural, gentle back and forth motion that is easy on your joints. This is the most comfortable pattern for achy knees and hips. The large pedals actually have straps to help keep your feet in place.

This is another great feature because I see people all the time that have a hard time keeping their feet on the pedals (either due to weakness or mobility restrictions).

The console doesn’t look that high-tech, but it’s large and easy to read. The LXT comes with 18 preprogrammed workouts and 16 resistance levels. This gives you a lot of control over your workouts.

It also means this trainer can offer you a tough workout regardless of your fitness level.

The LXT is also compatible with wireless heart rate monitors, however one isn’t included.

Another thing this trainer has going for it is that it can hold users up to 400 lb. This is the highest weight capacity thus far. This is amazing for a home fitness machine and can even hold up to commercial grade equipment.

The LXT also has it going on in the warranty department. HCI is backing this machine up with a lifetime frame warranty, a 3 year parts warranty, and a 1 year labor warranty.

(Video) Top 5: Best 2 in 1 Elliptical and Bike in 2022

Very impressive. Seeing a great warranty like this should give you a little more peace of mind.

As you can see, the LXT has a lot to offer. This is a perfect choice if you have mobility issues. The swivel seat makes getting in and out so much easier.

The warranty is also great. But if you are looking for fitness tracking or bright lights, this isn’t the recumbent trainer for you.

PS- this trainer is several hundred bucks less than the xR6xi and NuStep

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#6 HCI Fitness PhysioStep RXT Recumbent Cross Trainer – Best Weight Capacity

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Rounding out the list is another HCI Fitness produce, the PhysioStep RXT. This trainer is priced the same as the LXT model we just looked at, but does have a few key differences.

Choosing between them would be a matter of preference. Personally, I prefer the LXT, but depending on what you are looking for, this might be the right fit.

The first big difference is that the RXT doesn’t have a swivel seat. The seat does recline and is fully adjustable, but no swivel. The handlebars are also larger and offer multi-grip positions which I do like.

Speaking of which, I forgot to mention that the handles on the LXT swivel- some users don’t like this and prefer the stationary ones (they are also available for that model).

The pedal motion is also different on this trainer. The RXT utilizes a more circular, elliptical style pattern. This is where preference comes in.

I like the linear motion better for achy joints, but if your legs feel fine you won’t have any trouble with the elliptical pattern. It too is low impact.

The console on the RXT is very similar to the one found on the LXT. Same number of workout programs and same number of resistance levels (18 and 16 respectively).

The biggest difference is that the RXT is self-powered, meaning there is no electrical plug-in to the wall. The LXT has to be plugged in to operate. The RXT is also compatible with wireless heart rate monitors.

This recumbent trainer has a 500 lb weight capacity. We have a new winner! Yes, this trainer has the highest weight limit of the bunch. Looking at the image you’ll notice the RXT has that extended stability bar across the front.

I’m guessing this is the reason the weight limit is so much higher on this model. This is a great option for the larger users.

Finally, the RXT has the same great warranty as the LXT: lifetime frame, 3 year parts, 1 year labor. You can tell a lot by the warranty a company places on it’s products.

This warranty tells me HCI is confident that their stuff actually works and that they are built to last.

Overall, the PhysioStep RXT is another great recumbent trainer. If you prefer the elliptical pattern and the higher weight limit, this is the trainer for you.

It’s also nice that you don’t have to worry about plugging this thing in, you can put it anywhere and it’ll work just fine.

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Final Thoughts

Recumbent trainers are great, especially for people suffering from arthritis or mobility issues, because they offer a safe, comfortable mode of exercise.

They work well for improving cardiovascular function, but can also help improve strength and flexibility.

When looking for the best recumbent cross trainers, it’s a good idea to know how to compare apples to apples.

Comparing traits like the seat, the console, weight capacity, and warranty gives you a guideline of how to see how these machines truly differ from each other. It also helps you organize your thoughts and figure out which features are most important for you.

All though there aren’t quite as many recumbent trainers on the market as there are bikes or treadmills, there are still plenty to choose from.

The options also fall into a pretty wide price range, with the most economical choices starting around $700 and ranging upwards of $5000.

The recumbent trainers I discussed here all made the list because they have the most to offer for the price and are the highest rated.

I hope you found this article helpful. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below and I’ll get right back to you.

FAQs

Are recumbent ellipticals worth it? ›

The recumbent elliptical is a great option for those who prefer to be in a more comfortable, seated position while they work out. You're still getting all of the benefits of an elliptical workout: low impact, full body muscle targeting, calorie burn, cardio strengthening, etc. you're just sitting instead of standing.

Is a recumbent cross trainer good for weight loss? ›

Using A Recumbent Cross Trainer For Weight Loss

A recumbent cross trainer provides a low-impact, full-body workout with multiple resistance levels to challenge you as your fitness level improves. Increasing resistance will help you strengthen your muscles which in turn, will help you burn more calories.

Which is better a recumbent bike or recumbent elliptical? ›

While many users feel uncomfortable on recumbent exercise bikes after long periods of time, the ergonomic design of Recumbent Elliptical Cross Trainers provide a more natural stepping motion that allows you to workout longer.

Can you get a good workout from a recumbent stepper? ›

Even though the machine is designed with comfort in mind, users still get a highly effective cardio workout. The comfort and low impact of a recumbent stepper means many users are able to stick to their exercise routine for a longer period of time.

How do you use a recumbent cross trainer? ›

Be sure to note your seat position on the console. Make sure to keep good posture during your

Whats better for knees bike or elliptical? ›

Both the elliptical trainer and the stationary exercise bike are good for strengthening the knees because keeping them mobile and active will prevent further damage. However, the exercise bike wins for people looking for a cardio machine less strenuous on the knees.

Is recumbent bike good for arthritic knees? ›

Recumbent bikes are more stable and comfortable, so they're a better option for people with balance or mobility issues, says Schwartz.

Can a recumbent bike tone your legs? ›

As mentioned, a recumbent bike only uses the leg muscles, and not the upper body as with an upright bike, making it more focused on toning your legs. The angle of the pedals targets your glutes much more than an upright bike, providing greater potential for toning.

Does recumbent bike burn belly fat? ›

Using a recumbent bike burns calories, allowing you to lose weight all over your body, including your stomach. While spot reduction is a myth, using a combination of cardiovascular exercise, such as a recumbent bike, and abdominal strengthening exercises will help firm and flatten your stomach muscles.

What muscles does the recumbent cross trainer work? ›

The FreeStep Recumbent Cross Trainer delivers a total body workout, benefiting your lower body with its fluid stride resistance pedal motion as well as your arms, abs and back with its synchronized handle motion.

How many calories does a recumbent cross trainer burn? ›

Depending on the intensity, resistance and speed, you can burn up to 500 calories in just 30 minutes of exercise. Plus, the crosstrainer is considered a low-impact workout, because your feet are strapped to the pedals and the movement doesn't have any negative effect on the joints or back.

Why are recumbent bikes good for seniors? ›

A recumbent bike allows you to exercise your thighs, calves, and glute muscles with less strain. It has a wider and lower seat than an upright bike. Additionally, recumbent bikes put less strain on your joints, which is ideal for those with arthritis, and are much easier to balance on and sit comfortably.

Which is better exercise recumbent bike or treadmill? ›

In Summary Treadmills vs Recumbent Exercise Bikes

It's no doubt if you are looking to do running training a treadmill is the better option unless you want to some form cross training then a recumbent bike can be a good option especially as it is low impact and does train some different muscles more than running.

Which is better an upright or recumbent exercise bike? ›

Which One Is Best For Your Home? In general, we would recommend seniors or people who prefer not to engage too much core muscles during an exercise to choose a recumbent bike. For those, who focus more on the results and an overall fitness, you would want to choose the upright bike.

What is comparable to a NuStep? ›

NuStep's competitors. NuStep's competitors and similar companies include True Fitness, Rogue Fitness, Cybex and Allianz Biosciences. NuStep is a company that manufactures recumbent cardio fitness cross-trainers. True Fitness is a manufacturer of fitness equipment for facilities, home, and octane fitness.

What muscles does NuStep work? ›

The NuStep recumbent trainers are incredible pieces of kit that can help to increase the strength of your leg muscles as well as build up the intensity of the workout that you can do.

What muscles does the Scifit work? ›

Five minutes on an upper body exerciser, changing directions every 30 seconds, warms up and prepares the shoulders, elbows, wrists, chest, back and neck for exercise. In addition to cardiovascular work, SCIFIT's Upper Body Exercisers feature a safe, simple strength program.

Are under desk elliptical good for seniors? ›

Under-desk ellipticals are machines that a person can use to pedal while seated. Companies may also refer to them as seated or recumbent elliptical trainers. They are portable and suitable for use in the home or office. They may be particularly ideal for older adults who find exercise challenging.

What is the difference between Teeter lt1 and lt3? ›

The LT 3 has a rubber-coated handle it increases durability it resists sweat and it feels great now

What is a recumbent elliptical machine? ›

Siphons exclusive rex total body recumbent elliptical provides a smooth movement that allows

What exercise machine is best for arthritic knees? ›

Elliptical pros

Low-impact exercise typically puts less stress on your joints than high-impact exercise. This makes the elliptical a safer option if you have a musculoskeletal condition such as low-back pain, knee or hip pain, or other health conditions like arthritis or osteoporosis.

What exercise equipment is best for knees? ›

Which Fitness Equipment Is Best for People With Knee Pain?
  • People with knee pain generally find that they can walk with less discomfort using a treadmill than they can while walking outside. ...
  • Elliptical machines allow for more of a full body workout and incorporate both arm and leg movement.
15 Sept 2015

Is cross trainer good for joints? ›

Cross trainers are the ideal exercise machine for people with bad knees as they reduce the harsh impact during exercise that jumping or running gives. The motion of these trainers is softer and more of a circular motion which is beneficial for most users.

Can you regrow cartilage in your knee? ›

Cartilage Regeneration Options

MACI is a surgical procedure that uses cartilage-forming cells from your body to restore damaged cartilage in the knees. It involves a biopsy to harvest chondrocytes (cartilage-forming cells), which are allowed to multiply in a lab, and surgery to implant them into the damaged area.

What is the best exercise for bone on bone knee pain? ›

Walking. Even if you have stiff or sore knees, walking may be a great exercise. Start slow, stand tall, and keep at it. You can ease joint pain, strengthen your leg muscles, improve your posture, and improve your flexibility.

Why does my knee hurt when I ride my recumbent bike? ›

Cyclist's knee (also known as Patellofemoral pain syndrome) is an overuse condition caused by repetitive friction between the thigh bone and the knee cap. This can also be caused by decreased hip mobility, causing the knee to work harder over time, leading to knee pain.

What part of the body does a recumbent bike target? ›

What muscles does a recumbent bike work out? Recumbent bikes work your quads, hamstrings, calves, shins, and glutes. You'll also fire up your core muscles including your abs a bit while you work since the action of peddling comes from your abs, obliques, and hip flexors.

Can a recumbent bike help slim thighs? ›

The recumbent bike is an excellent exercise for toning your thighs -- because these muscles constantly engage while you rotate the pedals and burn calories throughout your body.

Do recumbent bikes strengthen hips? ›

Your thigh muscles connect directly to those in your hips and buttocks, so riding a recumbent bike helps tone muscles in those areas as well. This includes your gluteus, adductors and abductors, as well as your hip flexors.

Is 30 minutes on a recumbent bike good? ›

Select The Right Duration. The key to getting the most benefits from riding your recumbent exercise bike is pedaling for long enough. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, you should aim for at least 30 minutes of cardio per day.

How long should you exercise on a recumbent bike? ›

On average, 30-90 minutes per day, for 5-6 days per week, is a decent time frame when using a recumbent bike for cardio. If this is your only exercise for the day, 60 minutes is ideal. If you have other exercises planned, such as jogging, weight training, or bodyweight exercises, keeping it at 30 minutes is best.

Is recumbent bike good for lower back pain? ›

Reclining bicycles, also called recumbent bikes, can also help those with lower back pain who feel better in a reclining position. Although biking can be a good exercise option for those with existing back pain, it can also cause back pain if not done properly. Poor posture on the bicycle can strain the back.

How do you lose weight on a recumbent bike? ›

For weight loss, I recommend a minimum of 3 cardio sessions on your recumbent bike each week. Ideally, you'll be able to fit in 5-6 sessions with at least one day of total rest if you're really serious about losing weight.

How many calories do you burn in 30 minutes on a recumbent bike? ›

person pedaling at moderate intensity will burn approximately 4-7 calories per minute on a recumbent bike. This averages out to 165 calories burned per 30 minutes.

Is 15 minutes on a cross trainer enough? ›

Just 15 minutes on the elliptical can be beneficial to your overall health, as long as you are using your time efficiently and effectively. This can be done by using a High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) method.

How many calories do you burn riding a recumbent bike for 30 minutes? ›

Extend Exercise Duration

For example, a 150-pound man or woman who rides a recumbent bike at a moderate intensity for 30 minutes can expect to burn around 230 calories; that number will double to a total of 460 calories if the same person increases his workout time to 60 minutes.

How long should a 70 year old ride an exercise bike? ›

How Seniors Can Use an Exercise Bike. According to the World Health Organization, people aged 65 and above should aim for at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity. For seniors who are new to cycling, Simpson recommends starting with three times a week for 20 to 30 minutes each time.

Is it OK to do recumbent bike everyday? ›

On the other hand, if you are using recumbent exercise bikes which don't require as much physical effort, then it would be perfectly fine to use one everyday.

Is recumbent bike as good as walking? ›

Stationary cycling will result in the same benefits as walking, with the added bonus that it puts less pressure on your joints than other weight-bearing activities such as walking.

Is a recumbent bike good for sciatica? ›

What to do instead: Lower-impact aerobic machines and activities are fine and can even help sciatica, says Dr. Mukai. A recumbent bike is okay, too.

Why are recumbent bikes so expensive? ›

Recumbent bike seats are big, made out of soft and thick material (and plenty of it), has a backrest, and are usually adjustable too. All these extra components, and just the pure size of it, costs a lot more to manufacture than what the small saddles of traditional upright bikes do.

Will a recumbent bike strengthen your back? ›

While they work your legs and heart just as hard as any stationary bike can, recumbents also provide excellent back support. This helps reduce excess stress on your spine and lower-back muscles. The result: You get a great, feel-good workout!

Is recumbent bike good for spinal stenosis? ›

Data suggests that bike-riding may be a comfortable activity for individuals with lumbar spinal stenosis. Recumbent bikes, which are a type of stationary bicycle, may also be comfortable for certain types of low back pain, such as degenerative disc disease affecting the lumbar area.

What is comparable to a NuStep? ›

NuStep's competitors. NuStep's competitors and similar companies include True Fitness, Rogue Fitness, Cybex and Allianz Biosciences. NuStep is a company that manufactures recumbent cardio fitness cross-trainers. True Fitness is a manufacturer of fitness equipment for facilities, home, and octane fitness.

What muscles does NuStep work? ›

The NuStep recumbent trainers are incredible pieces of kit that can help to increase the strength of your leg muscles as well as build up the intensity of the workout that you can do.

What is a cross trainer exercise bike? ›

A cross trainer allows you to pedal backwards, something that most exercise bikes do not. On a cross trainer, this type of training balances the strength of the muscles surrounding the joints, whereas on an exercise bike, there is less effect on these muscles.

Does cross trainer burn calories? ›

Depending on the intensity, resistance and speed, you can burn up to 500 calories in just 30 minutes of exercise. Plus, the crosstrainer is considered a low-impact workout, because your feet are strapped to the pedals and the movement doesn't have any negative effect on the joints or back.

Are under desk elliptical good for seniors? ›

Under-desk ellipticals are machines that a person can use to pedal while seated. Companies may also refer to them as seated or recumbent elliptical trainers. They are portable and suitable for use in the home or office. They may be particularly ideal for older adults who find exercise challenging.

What is the weight limit for the FreeStep? ›

Standard installation can support up to 750 lb per, or two 375 patients on one 8-foot track. The construction of FreeStep SAS allows multiple users performing varying exercises to benefit from supported ambulation without increasing PT attention.

What's the difference between the teeter lt1 and lt3? ›

The LT 3 has a rubber-coated handle it increases durability it resists sweat and it feels great now

Is NuStep good for knees? ›

Another low-impact option? Exercising on a NuStep cross trainer. The NuStep's seated design, low-inertia start-up and user-controlled step length help minimize joint stress. And, the total-body workout is an ideal way to take the steps outlined above…all while giving your knees a break.

What muscles does a recumbent cross trainer work? ›

Recumbent Bike Basics

Similar to the elliptical machine, you engage your hamstrings, quadriceps, glutes, calf muscles and core when pedaling a recumbent bike. But because you are standing when exercising on an elliptical, you engage your core more on that machine than on a recumbent bike.

How many steps on a NuStep is a mile? ›

Measure your progress by the number of steps you are covering each day. Generally speaking you can count on 2,000 steps equaling one mile.

Is a cross trainer better than a treadmill? ›

The cross trainer is a better option for people with joint pain. Some people find that running on a treadmill or outdoors can cause joint pain, particularly in areas like the knees. On the other hand, the cross trainer is a low-impact cardio option that puts less strain on your joints.

Is it worth getting a cross trainer? ›

The cross trainer is just what you need: half an hour per day on the cross trainer, working at 70% of your maximum heart rate, will shed excess fat incredibly efficiently. Not only will the exercises seem easier because they use all of your muscles, but on top of that you'll also burn more calories.

Which is better spin bike or cross trainer? ›

Both machines provide a low impact workout. However, if you have lower body injuries the spin bike provides a lower impact experience and can help you while you recover when they have the perimeter weighted flywheel. The elliptical will help you burn more calories at the same levels of intensity.

Can a cross trainer burn belly fat? ›

Cross trainers can work up to 80% of your muscles when used correctly and help burn fat not just during your workout but even for hours after. So to conclude yes, you can lose weight, cut belly fat, and reap many other benefits by using a cross trainer consistently as part of a healthy life style.

Is 20 minutes on cross trainer enough? ›

This entirely depends on the type of elliptical workouts you do during these 20 minutes, for example, following simplistic workouts at the same pace during this time might not make you work hard enough, but if you are doing HIIT workouts with varying intensities 20 minutes is more than enough for a good workout.

Is 30 minutes on a cross trainer enough? ›

Even competing against yourself can motivate you to push harder. And again: be persistent. 15-30 minutes on your elliptical machine per day is enough to maintain your wanted weight or even lose more.

Videos

1. The Best Elliptical Machines for Home Gyms 2022 [Buying Guide]
(A2Z Review)
2. Sunny Recumbent Bike Cross-Trainer Review for Total Knee Replacement Therapy
(Total Therapy Solution - Physical Therapy)
3. 7 Best Recumbent Exercise Bike for Your Home Gym
(Home Gym Unlimited)
4. ✅ Cross Trainer: Best Elliptical Cross Trainer 2021 (Buying Guide)
(Review Tube)
5. Review of the Teeter FreeStep LT3 Recumbent Cross Trainer
(Diana Rogers)
6. Recumbent Bike 002 - Best Recumbent Bike Guide - Excel Fitness
(Excel Fitness)

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