Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients (2022)

Objective. - The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of significant traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a headache population. Background. - Several recent publications have emphasized the relationship between life stressors and/or daily hassles and recurrent headaches. However, little is known about the prevalence and impact of major traumatic stressors in patients with recurrent headaches. Methods. - Eighty patients with either migraine or tension-type headache completed a PTSD checklist. Data were compared with those from patients with chronic masticatory muscle pain of similar intensity and duration. Results. - Almost 64% of the headache patients reported one or more major traumatic stressors. This percentage was not significantly different from that of the comparison group, and fell within the broad range reported for exposure to traumatic stressors in epidemiologic studies with nonpatient populations. One out of 6 patients in the total headache sample, and 1 out of 4 of those reporting a traumatic stressor, reported symptoms suggestive of current PTSD. The prevalence of current PTSD-like symptomatology reported by the headache patients was comparable to that of the comparison group of the present study, but higher than that reported for the general population in the available literature printed in English. Traumatic stressors most often reported were not related to direct physical trauma, but rather associated with loss or serious illness of a loved one. Conclusion. - Exposure to traumatic events in patients with a primary diagnosis of recurrent headaches is similar to that reported for chronic masticatory muscle pain patients or nonpatient populations. However, symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of current PTSD appear to be more frequent in patients with recurrent headaches than reported in the scientific literature printed in English for nonpatient populations. Screening for PTSD symptomatology is recommended as part of the routine clinical evaluation of headache.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1365-1374
Number of pages10
JournalHeadache
Volume45
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
  • Migraine
  • PTSD Check List-Civilian
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Tension-type headache
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • APA
  • Author
  • BIBTEX
  • Harvard
  • Standard
  • RIS
  • Vancouver

De Leeuw, R., Schmidt, J. E., & Carlson, C. R. (2005). Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients. Headache, 45(10), 1365-1374. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2005.00269.x

De Leeuw, Reny ; Schmidt, John E. ; Carlson, Charles R. / Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients. In: Headache. 2005 ; Vol. 45, No. 10. pp. 1365-1374.

@article{3ea04a6a517146cdb39eaf0cf11ea1f8,

title = "Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients",

abstract = "Objective. - The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of significant traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a headache population. Background. - Several recent publications have emphasized the relationship between life stressors and/or daily hassles and recurrent headaches. However, little is known about the prevalence and impact of major traumatic stressors in patients with recurrent headaches. Methods. - Eighty patients with either migraine or tension-type headache completed a PTSD checklist. Data were compared with those from patients with chronic masticatory muscle pain of similar intensity and duration. Results. - Almost 64% of the headache patients reported one or more major traumatic stressors. This percentage was not significantly different from that of the comparison group, and fell within the broad range reported for exposure to traumatic stressors in epidemiologic studies with nonpatient populations. One out of 6 patients in the total headache sample, and 1 out of 4 of those reporting a traumatic stressor, reported symptoms suggestive of current PTSD. The prevalence of current PTSD-like symptomatology reported by the headache patients was comparable to that of the comparison group of the present study, but higher than that reported for the general population in the available literature printed in English. Traumatic stressors most often reported were not related to direct physical trauma, but rather associated with loss or serious illness of a loved one. Conclusion. - Exposure to traumatic events in patients with a primary diagnosis of recurrent headaches is similar to that reported for chronic masticatory muscle pain patients or nonpatient populations. However, symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of current PTSD appear to be more frequent in patients with recurrent headaches than reported in the scientific literature printed in English for nonpatient populations. Screening for PTSD symptomatology is recommended as part of the routine clinical evaluation of headache.",

keywords = "Migraine, PTSD Check List-Civilian, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Tension-type headache",

author = "{De Leeuw}, Reny and Schmidt, {John E.} and Carlson, {Charles R.}",

note = "Copyright: Copyright 2008 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",

year = "2005",

(Video) 12 signs you might be suffering from PTSD

doi = "10.1111/j.1526-4610.2005.00269.x",

language = "English",

volume = "45",

pages = "1365--1374",

number = "10",

}

De Leeuw, R, Schmidt, JE & Carlson, CR 2005, 'Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients', Headache, vol. 45, no. 10, pp. 1365-1374. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2005.00269.x

Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients. / De Leeuw, Reny; Schmidt, John E.; Carlson, Charles R.

In: Headache, Vol. 45, No. 10, 2005, p. 1365-1374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients

AU - De Leeuw, Reny

AU - Schmidt, John E.

AU - Carlson, Charles R.

N1 - Copyright:Copyright 2008 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Objective. - The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of significant traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a headache population. Background. - Several recent publications have emphasized the relationship between life stressors and/or daily hassles and recurrent headaches. However, little is known about the prevalence and impact of major traumatic stressors in patients with recurrent headaches. Methods. - Eighty patients with either migraine or tension-type headache completed a PTSD checklist. Data were compared with those from patients with chronic masticatory muscle pain of similar intensity and duration. Results. - Almost 64% of the headache patients reported one or more major traumatic stressors. This percentage was not significantly different from that of the comparison group, and fell within the broad range reported for exposure to traumatic stressors in epidemiologic studies with nonpatient populations. One out of 6 patients in the total headache sample, and 1 out of 4 of those reporting a traumatic stressor, reported symptoms suggestive of current PTSD. The prevalence of current PTSD-like symptomatology reported by the headache patients was comparable to that of the comparison group of the present study, but higher than that reported for the general population in the available literature printed in English. Traumatic stressors most often reported were not related to direct physical trauma, but rather associated with loss or serious illness of a loved one. Conclusion. - Exposure to traumatic events in patients with a primary diagnosis of recurrent headaches is similar to that reported for chronic masticatory muscle pain patients or nonpatient populations. However, symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of current PTSD appear to be more frequent in patients with recurrent headaches than reported in the scientific literature printed in English for nonpatient populations. Screening for PTSD symptomatology is recommended as part of the routine clinical evaluation of headache.

AB - Objective. - The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of significant traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a headache population. Background. - Several recent publications have emphasized the relationship between life stressors and/or daily hassles and recurrent headaches. However, little is known about the prevalence and impact of major traumatic stressors in patients with recurrent headaches. Methods. - Eighty patients with either migraine or tension-type headache completed a PTSD checklist. Data were compared with those from patients with chronic masticatory muscle pain of similar intensity and duration. Results. - Almost 64% of the headache patients reported one or more major traumatic stressors. This percentage was not significantly different from that of the comparison group, and fell within the broad range reported for exposure to traumatic stressors in epidemiologic studies with nonpatient populations. One out of 6 patients in the total headache sample, and 1 out of 4 of those reporting a traumatic stressor, reported symptoms suggestive of current PTSD. The prevalence of current PTSD-like symptomatology reported by the headache patients was comparable to that of the comparison group of the present study, but higher than that reported for the general population in the available literature printed in English. Traumatic stressors most often reported were not related to direct physical trauma, but rather associated with loss or serious illness of a loved one. Conclusion. - Exposure to traumatic events in patients with a primary diagnosis of recurrent headaches is similar to that reported for chronic masticatory muscle pain patients or nonpatient populations. However, symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of current PTSD appear to be more frequent in patients with recurrent headaches than reported in the scientific literature printed in English for nonpatient populations. Screening for PTSD symptomatology is recommended as part of the routine clinical evaluation of headache.

KW - Migraine

KW - PTSD Check List-Civilian

KW - Post-traumatic stress disorder

KW - Tension-type headache

(Video) Understanding PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645740163&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645740163&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1526-4610.2005.00269.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1526-4610.2005.00269.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 16324169

AN - SCOPUS:33645740163

VL - 45

SP - 1365

EP - 1374

IS - 10

ER -

(Video) Headaches After Traumatic Brain Injury

De Leeuw R, Schmidt JE, Carlson CR. Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients. Headache. 2005;45(10):1365-1374. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2005.00269.x

(Video) POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD), Causes, Signs and Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment.

(Video) 6 Hidden Signs of Complex PTSD (cPTSD) | MedCircle

Videos

1. Post-Traumatic Headache in Veterans
(American Headache Society)
2. Webinar – Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
(IMHsingapore)
3. Understanding and Treating Chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
(UW Video)
4. POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTS)
(LEARNARC)
5. POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
(ZaaraJas Talks)
6. What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder PTSD - In Hindi by Dr Rajiv Sharma Psychiatrist
(ABeautifulMindClinic)

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Roderick King

Last Updated: 08/15/2022

Views: 6351

Rating: 4 / 5 (51 voted)

Reviews: 82% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Roderick King

Birthday: 1997-10-09

Address: 3782 Madge Knoll, East Dudley, MA 63913

Phone: +2521695290067

Job: Customer Sales Coordinator

Hobby: Gunsmithing, Embroidery, Parkour, Kitesurfing, Rock climbing, Sand art, Beekeeping

Introduction: My name is Roderick King, I am a cute, splendid, excited, perfect, gentle, funny, vivacious person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.