Tylenol (Acetaminophen) Oral, Rectal: Uses, Dosages, Side Effects (2022)

What Is Tylenol?

Tylenol (acetaminophen) is an over-the-counter (OTC) drug that can help relieve pain and reduce fever. Tylenol is classified as an analgesic, which is a pain reliever. It is also classified as an antipyretic, which means it can reduce fevers.

Tylenol works on the hypothalamus (the region of the brain where body temperature is regulated) to reduce fever. It also works on the central nervous system to help with pain.

Although Tylenol is available as a single-ingredient product, the ingredient in Tylenol, acetaminophen, can be found in many medications, both OTC (such as cough and cold and flu medications) and prescription (such as in combination with opioid pain medications). This article will focus on the single-ingredient product acetaminophen.

Tylenol is available in various oral formulations, such as tablets, capsules, suspension, liquid gels, chewable tablets, and dissolve packs. Acetaminophen is also available as a rectal suppository called FeverAll, which is placed inside the rectum. FeverAll is available in adult and children's formulations under either brand or generic versions.

Drug Facts

Generic Name:Acetaminophen

Brand Name(s):Tylenol, FeverAll

Drug Availability: Over the counter (also available in some prescription products as a combination drug)

Administration Route:Oral, rectal

Therapeutic Classification:Analgesic (pain reliever) and antipyretic (fever reducer)

Available Generically:Yes

Controlled Substance:N/A

Active Ingredient:Acetaminophen

Dosage Form(s):Oral tablet, capsule, liquid gel, dissolve pack, chewable tablets, suspension, rectal suppository

What Is Tylenol Used For?

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Tylenol to temporarily relieve pain and reduce fever. Some of the common uses for Tylenol include headache, backache, muscle pain, minor arthritis pain, colds, tooth pain, and menstrual cramps.

Although it may help with pain, acetaminophen is not an anti-inflammatory drug. It will not reduce swelling or inflammation, unlike nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like Advil and Motrin (ibuprofen) or Aleve and Naprosyn (naproxen).

How to Take Tylenol

Take your acetaminophen product as directed on the label. Do not take more than recommended.

If you are giving acetaminophen to a child, be sure to use the correct product for the child's age and weight. Consult with your child's healthcare provider if you have questions about appropriate use and/or dosage. Adults can usually take Tylenol four to six times throughout the day. However, it is important to not take more than directed on the package label due to the potential risk of liver damage.

The following are tips for using various acetaminophen formulations:

  • Tylenol suspension: Shake well before using. Measure the medication with a medication measuring oral syringe or dosing cup, not a kitchen measuring device. If the product comes with a measuring device, use the measuring device that comes with the product.
  • Tylenol dissolving tablets: Chew the tablet or let it dissolve on the tongue.
  • Tylenol chewable tablets: Chew the tablet thoroughly before you swallow.
  • Tylenol extended-release tablet: Swallow the tablet whole. Do not chew, crush, or split the tablet.
  • FeverAll rectal suppository: Follow the directions on the product packaging. Ask your healthcare provider for dosing for a child if unsure. Unwrap the suppository before inserting it rectally (in the rectum). The suppository is for rectal use only and should not be taken by mouth or swallowed.

Do not take acetaminophen for more than three days for fever or 10 days for pain. Do not use it for more than five days in children. Check with your healthcare provider if symptoms worsen or do not improve. Contact your child's healthcare provider if they develop a sore throat.

Storage

Store acetaminophen at room temperature, away from direct heat, moisture, and light. Keep the medication out of reach and out of sight of children and pets.

How Long Does Tylenol Take to Work?

Oral Tylenol will start working anywhere from 20 to 45 minutes after taking it, with some forms such as the dissolving packs possibly working even faster. The suppository form may take longer to work and depends on factors such as your rectal pH (how acidic or basic it is) and if anything is in the rectum.

What Are the Side Effects of Tylenol?

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. A medical professional can advise you on side effects. If you experience other effects, contact your pharmacist or a medical professional. You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/medwatch or 800-FDA-1088.

As with all medications, Tylenol can cause side effects. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effects you experience while taking this medication.

(Video) Acetaminophen Nursing Considerations, Side Effects and Mechanism of Action Pharmacology for Nurses

Common Side Effects

The most common side effects of Tylenol are:

  • Nausea
  • Rash
  • Headache

Severe Side Effects

Call your healthcare provider right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Hypersensitivity reaction or anaphylaxis: Symptoms can include rash, hives, swelling around the lips, tongue, and face, and difficulty breathing.
  • Severe skin reaction: People who experience red skin, blisters, and/or rash should stop using Tylenol and get emergency medical help.
  • Liver toxicity: Taking more than the maximum daily dose, taking Tylenol with other drugs that contain the same ingredient (acetaminophen), or drinking three or more alcoholic beverages per day while using Tylenol can cause severe liver damage. Do not use Tylenol with other drugs that contain acetaminophen because too much may be taken accidentally. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you need help understanding the ingredients. If you already have liver problems, ask your healthcare provider before using acetaminophen.
  • Kidney problems: People who have kidney problems should ask their healthcare provider before using Tylenol.
  • Anemia (low red blood cell counts): Symptoms may include tiredness, weakness, and cold hands and feet.
  • Low platelet levels (platelets help blood clot normally, so having low platelets makes a person more likely to bruise and bleed): Symptoms may include tiredness, bruising, and bleeding.

Long-Term Side Effects

While many people tolerate Tylenol well, long-term or delayed side effects are possible. Some long-term side effects can be mild, such as:

  • Anxiety
  • Appetite loss
  • Muscle cramps
  • Purpura (a purplish rash due to small blood vessels leaking under the skin)

Moderate long-term side effects can include:

  • Constipation
  • Liver problems; jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes)
  • Low levels of magnesium, potassium, and phosphate in the blood
  • Low levels of red and white blood cells
  • Low platelet levels, which can cause bleeding
  • Medication overuse headache (also known as rebound headaches): These are headaches that can occur from the regular use of certain pain medications. If you are using Tylenol or a medication that contains acetaminophen, discuss with your healthcare provider how to prevent medication overuse headaches.
  • Skin rashes
  • Swelling of the extremities

Severe long-term side effects may include:

  • Hearing loss
  • Heart problems, such as heart failure
  • Kidney problems, such as kidney failure
  • Liver problems, such as liver failure
  • Low levels of red and white blood cells
  • Lung problems that can cause cough and shortness of breath
  • Rhabdomyolysis (muscle breakdown that can cause kidney damage)
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome (a severe skin reaction characterized by red or purple rash, itching or peeling skin, fever, sore throat, and burning eyes) or other skin reactions

Report Side Effects

Tylenol may cause other side effects. Call your healthcare provider if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your provider may send a report to the FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program or by phone (800-332-1088).

(800) 332-1088

Dosage: How Much Tylenol Should I Take?

Drug Content Provided and Reviewed byIBM Micromedex®

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For pain or fever:
    • For oral and rectal dosage forms (capsules, granules, powders, solution, suppositories, suspension, or tablets):
      • Adults and teenagers—650 to 1000 milligrams (mg) every 4 to 6 hours as needed. Dose is based on form and strength. Carefully follow the label instructions for the maximum dose per day.
      • Children—Dose is based on weight or age. Carefully follow the label instructions for the maximum dose per day.
        • Children 11 to 12 years of age: 320 to 480 mg every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
        • Children 9 to 11 years of age: 320 to 400 mg every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
        • Children 6 to 9 years of age: 320 mg every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
        • Children 4 to 6 years of age: 240 mg every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
        • Children 2 to 4 years of age: 160 mg every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
        • Children under 2 years of age: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Modifications

You may need to use caution when taking Tylenol if you are 65 years or older, especially if you have other medical conditions.

When giving Tylenol to a child, use the measuring device that comes with the product. Do not use a kitchen spoon. Check with the child's healthcare provider if you need guidance on product selection and dosing.

People with liver or kidney problems should ask their healthcare provider before using Tylenol, as a lower dose may be required.

Also, consult with a healthcare provider before using Tylenol if you drink alcohol. The risk of liver problems is increased in people who drink alcohol.

Although Tylenol is often a preferred drug to use when needed during pregnancy or breastfeeding, consult your healthcare provider before taking any medication while pregnant, trying to become pregnant, or while breastfeeding. This is especially important because acetaminophen is found in many combination products in which the other ingredients in the product are not safe to use while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Missed Dose

Because Tylenol is intended to be taken as needed, if you miss a dose, take it when you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your regular dosing schedule. Do not take an extra dose to try to make up for a missed dose.

Overdose: What Happens If I Take Too Much Tylenol?

Do not take more Tylenol than directed on the package label. In general, adults should not take more than 4,000 milligrams (mg) in one day and children should not take more than five doses in one day.

Taking too much Tylenol can causesymptoms such as:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Appetite loss
  • Sweating
  • Bleeding
  • Bruising
  • Upper stomach pain
  • Yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes (jaundice)

A Tylenol overdose may also cause flu-like symptoms and extreme tiredness.

(Video) Acetaminophen Side Effects

What Happens If I Overdose on Tylenol?

If you think you or someone else may have overdosed on Tylenol, call a healthcare provider or the Poison Control Center (800-222-1222).

If someone collapses or isn't breathing after taking Tylenol, call 911 immediately.

Precautions

Drug Content Provided and Reviewed byIBM Micromedex®

It is very important that your doctor check the progress of you or your child while you are using this medicine. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to take it.

If your symptoms or fever do not improve within a few days or if they become worse, check with your doctor.

Many combination medicines contain acetaminophen, including products with brand names such as Alka-Seltzer Plus®, Comtrex®, Drixoral®, Excedrin Migraine®, Midol®, Sinutab®, Sudafed®, Theraflu®, and Vanquish®. Adding these medicines to the medicine you already take may cause you to get more than a safe amount of acetaminophen. Talk to your doctor before taking more than one medicine that contains acetaminophen.

Check with your doctor right away if you or your child have pain or tenderness in the upper stomach; pale stools; dark urine; loss of appetite; nausea; unusual tiredness or weakness; or yellow eyes or skin. These could be symptoms of a serious liver problem.

If you will be taking more than an occasional 1 or 2 doses of acetaminophen, do not drink alcoholic beverages. To do so may increase the chance of liver damage, especially if you drink large amounts of alcohol on a regular basis, if you take more acetaminophen than is recommended on the label, or if you take it regularly for a long time.

Acetaminophen may interfere with the results of some medical tests. Before you have any medical tests, tell the person in charge if you have taken acetaminophen within the past 3 or 4 days. You may also call the laboratory ahead of time to find out whether acetaminophen will cause a problem.

Acetaminophen may cause false results with some blood glucose tests. If you are diabetic and notice a change in your test results, or if you have any questions, check with your doctor.

If you think you have taken too much acetaminophen, get emergency help at once, even if there are no signs of poisoning. Treatment to prevent liver damage must be started as soon as possible.

What Are Reasons I Shouldn't Take Tylenol?

Tylenol is not appropriate for everyone. You should not take this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen or any of the inactive ingredients in Tylenol.

Tylenol may be used with caution in some people only if the healthcare provider determines it is safe. This includes:

  • People with liver or kidney problems
  • People with hypovolemia (low fluids in the body)
  • People who are malnourished
  • People who regularly drink a certain amount of alcohol
  • People with phenylketonuria, or PKU (do not use acetaminophen products that contain aspartame, such as certain chewable products)

What Other Medications May Interact With Tylenol?

Tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines you take, including prescription and OTC medicines, and vitamins or supplements.

Tylenol should not be used in combination with topical lidocaine or topical prilocaine (numbing agents) in infants less than 12 months old. In adults and children older than 12 months, if the combination must be used together, the lowest doses and shortest treatment time should be used.

The following medications can increase the risk of toxicity when taken with Tylenol:

  • Mysoline (primidone)
  • Rifadin (rifampin)
  • Barbiturates such as phenobarbital or pentobarbital

If taking any of the above medications, talk to your healthcare provider before using Tylenol. You may need to avoid the medication or use a lower dose.

Other interactions can occur with:

  • A blood thinner called Jantoven (warfarin): This interaction can increase the risk of bleeding, which may be life-threatening.
  • Other medications containing acetaminophen: Combining acetaminophen from more than one medication can increase the risk of overdose and toxicity.
  • NSAIDs such as aspirin, Celebrex (celecoxib), Mobic (meloxicam), or Advil and Motrin, especially with long-term treatment: Taking these with Tylenol can increase the risk of kidney problems.

Other drug interactions may occur with Tylenol. Consult your healthcare provider for a complete list of drug interactions.

(Video) Should You Stop Taking Tylenol? (Acetaminophen/Paracetamol)

What Medications Are Similar?

Tylenol is used for fever or mild-to-moderate pain relief. It contains acetaminophen, known as an antipyretic (fever reducer) and an analgesic (pain reliever). There are no other drugs that are exactly like Tylenol.

NSAIDs are a class of drugs often confused with Tylenol. Like Tylenol, NSAIDs can help with fever and pain relief. However, NSAIDs can also reduce inflammation, unlike Tylenol. OTC and prescription forms of NSAIDs are available in various formulations, including oral and topical. NSAIDs have a higher risk of stomach-related side effects and can cause serious side effects such as stomach ulcers and heart problems like stroke or heart attack.

Examples of NSAIDs include:

  • Advil, Motrin (ibuprofen)
  • Aleve (naproxen)
  • Aspirin
  • Celebrex (celecoxib)
  • Mobic (meloxicam)
  • Voltaren (diclofenac)

You will also see combination products with the name "Tylenol" on them at drugstores. These products are often used for flu or cough and cold symptoms and contain multiple ingredients in addition to acetaminophen, such as cough suppressants, antihistamines, and nasal decongestants. Acetaminophen can also be found in other medications such as Excedrin Migraine.

Consult your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are trying to find a suitable OTC option to treat your cough or cold symptoms. There are many products with similar names and ingredients, so you'll want to ensure you pick the safest medication for you.

Acetaminophen can also be found in many stronger pain medications used for more severe pain, such as Percocet (oxycodone and acetaminophen) or Vicodin (hydrocodone and acetaminophen). These medications are controlled substances because they have the potential for abuse and dependence. They are only used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

This is a list of drugs also used for pain. It is not a list of drugs recommended to take with Tylenol. Discuss any questions or concerns with your pharmacist or a healthcare provider.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is Tylenol used for?

    Tylenol is an over-the-counter (OTC) medication used to treat pain or fever. It is also part of many combination products, including OTC headache, flu, cough and cold medications, and prescription pain medications.

  • How does Tylenol work?

    Tylenol works on the hypothalamus to reduce fever. The hypothalamus is an area in the brain that regulates body temperature, as well as performing other functions. It also works on the central nervous system (CNS) to help relieve pain.

  • What drugs should not be taken with Tylenol?

    Tylenol interacts with several drugs, which may require a dosage adjustment or avoiding the medication altogether. Before taking Tylenol for the first time, tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist about all of the medications you take. When taking Tylenol, it is important to avoid other medications that contain acetaminophen. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you need help understanding the ingredients in your medications.

  • How long does it take for Tylenol to work?

    Oral Tylenol starts to work in about 20 to 45 minutes, depending on the dosage form. Some formulations, such as the dissolving packs, may work faster. The suppository form may take longer to work.

  • What are the side effects of Tylenol?

    Tylenol's most common side effects are nausea, headache, and rash. Other side effects are possible, and some may be severe, such as liver or kidney problems.

    (Video) Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen Nursing Considerations, Side Effects, and Mechanism of Action

How Can I Stay Healthy While Taking Tylenol?

Talk to your healthcare provider about other non-pharmaceutical measures you can try with Tylenol to relieve your symptoms. For example, if you are taking Tylenol for arthritis pain, you may also want to try physical therapy.

If you drink alcohol, ask your healthcare provider about alcohol intake while taking Tylenol. Tylenol can harm the liver, and alcohol can increase the risk of liver damage.

When taking Tylenol, follow the directions on the label carefully. If you have certain medical conditions, you may need a lower dose. Ask your healthcare provider if you are unsure.

Children are dosed according to age and weight. To give the correct dosage, this medication should be measured with a medicine measuring device. Check with your child's healthcare provider or pharmacist before using Tylenol if you are unsure of the dose or the appropriate product.

While unlikely, severe skin reactions are possible. Watch out for any skin changes, such as rash, redness, or blistering, and notify your healthcare provider right away if changes occur.

Medical Disclaimer

Verywell Health's drug information is meant for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a healthcare provider. Consult your healthcare provider before taking any new medication(s). IBM Watson Micromedex provides some of the drug content, as indicated on the page.

(Video) Acetaminophen Uses, Information, Dosage and Side effects

FAQs

What is the most serious side effect of acetaminophen? ›

Liver damage is the most serious side effect of acetaminophen and it can be fatal. Liver damage can occur when a person exceeds the maximum daily dose of 4,000 milligrams — but it's also been known to occur in some people at even lower doses.

What are the side effects of acetaminophen Tylenol? ›

Side effects of Tylenol include:
  • nausea,
  • stomach pain,
  • loss of appetite,
  • itching,
  • rash,
  • headache,
  • dark urine,
  • clay-colored stools,

What is the side effect of suppository? ›

Rectal irritation/burning, abdominal discomfort/cramps, or small amounts of mucus in the stool may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

How often can you give rectal Tylenol? ›

For oral and rectal dosage forms (capsules, granules, powders, solution, suppositories, suspension, or tablets): Adults and teenagers—650 to 1000 milligrams (mg) every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

Does Tylenol suppository affect the liver? ›

Too much acetaminophen may cause liver problems. Follow the directions exactly. Do not take more acetaminophen in a day than directed.

How long does it take for Tylenol to cause liver damage? ›

Damage can occur in just 24 hours

“Severe damage could occur if people take more than four grams of acetaminophen in 24 hours,” says Dr. Ke-Qin Hu, a leading liver disease specialist with UCI Health Liver and Pancreas Services.

How long does Tylenol stay in your system? ›

If you have no significant medical conditions and only take acetaminophen at recommended doses, then it is typically out of your system within 12 to 24 hours after your last dose. If you've been taking more than the recommended doses of acetaminophen, it could take a few days for your body to clear it.

Does acetaminophen hurt your kidneys? ›

It shouldn't hurt the kidneys. Tylenol (acetaminophen) is almost completely broken down by the liver. During this process, a toxic chemical forms. Normally, the liver makes it non-toxic.

Can acetaminophen cause liver damage? ›

Introduction. Acetaminophen is a widely used nonprescription analgesic and antipyretic medication for mild-to-moderate pain and fever. Harmless at low doses, acetaminophen has direct hepatotoxic potential when taken as an overdose and can cause acute liver injury and death from acute liver failure.

Will acetaminophen make you sleepy? ›

Acetaminophen helps to reduce fever and/or mild to moderate pain (such as headache, backache, aches/pains due to muscle strain, cold, or flu). The antihistamine in this product may cause drowsiness, so it can also be used as a nighttime sleep aid.

Does taking too much Tylenol make you tired? ›

Get medical help right away if you take too much acetaminophen (overdose), even if you feel well. Overdose symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, sweating, stomach/abdominal pain, extreme tiredness, yellowing eyes/skin, and dark urine.

How long after suppository Can I poop? ›

Try to avoid passing stool for up to 60 minutes after inserting the suppository, unless it is a laxative. Not passing stool gives the medication enough time to enter the bloodstream and start working.

How many suppository can I use in a day? ›

1 suppository every 4 to 6 hours up to a maximum of 4 suppositories in 24 hours. Adults + Children 12 years and over: 1 -2 suppositories every 4 to 6 hours up to a maximum of 8 suppositories in 24 hours.

How long does it take for a suppository to absorb? ›

On average most suppositories will melt in 10-15 minutes, although it can take up to a half hours. If you are still having trouble contact your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Why is acetaminophen given rectally? ›

Acetaminophen rectal is used to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches or muscle aches and to reduce a fever. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing the way the body senses pain and by cooling the body.

Can you give 2 Tylenol suppositories? ›

For junior-strength suppositories that read 325 mg on the label: Give a dose: 2 suppositories every 4 to 6 hours. Maximum dose: 6 doses in 24 hours.

Are Tylenol suppositories safe? ›

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has therefore discouraged the use of rectal suppositories of acetaminophen owing to concerns of toxic effects and unpredictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics due to poor and erratic absorption.

Can I take Tylenol on empty stomach? ›

TYLENOL® can help relieve your pain while being gentle on your stomach. TYLENOL® can be taken on an empty stomach. TYLENOL® may be a safe over the counter pain reliever for those with a history of stomach bleeding, stomach ulcers, or stomach problems such as heartburn. TYLENOL® is not an NSAID.

Do acetaminophen suppositories need to be refrigerated? ›

Store it at room temperature, away from light and heat. Do not freeze. You may store the suppositories in the refrigerator, but do not freeze them.

How much acetaminophen is in a suppository? ›

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Dosing
ACETAMINOPHEN DOSAGE (Tylenol® every 4 hours, as needed.) *Multiple types available check bottle carefully.
WeightAgeRectal Suppositories (Various doses)
12-17 lbs4-11 mos.(1) 80 mg suppository
18-23 lbs12-23 mos.(1) 120 mg suppository
24-35 lbs2-3 yrs.(½) 325 mg suppository
6 more rows

How much Tylenol will hurt your liver? ›

Amounts of acetaminophen as low as 3 to 4 grams in a single dose or 4 to 6 grams over 24 hours have been reported to cause severe liver injury in some people, sometimes even resulting in death.

Is Tylenol hard on kidneys or liver? ›

Acetaminophen, sold over the counter worldwide to control pain and reduce fever, is not the harmless drug it appears for every patient. It is toxic for those with compromised liver function, and long-term use can cause liver or kidney damage.

How do you know if your liver is damaged from medication? ›

Early Signs of Liver Damage from Medication

Fever. Diarrhea. Dark urine. Jaundice, a condition that occurs when a substance called bilirubin builds up in the blood and causes the skin and whites of the eyes to appear yellow.

Is Tylenol a blood thinner? ›

While some people take aspirin because of its mild blood-thinning effects, Tylenol isn't a blood thinner.

How long does a 500 mg Tylenol last? ›

Jump to product:
Extra Strength TYLENOL® Extra Strength Caplets
ACTIVE INGREDIENT, DOSAGE* & DIRECTIONSDOSAGE FREQUENCY*
Acetaminophen 500 mg (in each caplet)2 caplets every 6 hours while symptoms last
1 more row

Can you reverse kidney damage from Tylenol? ›

The azotemia of acetaminophen toxicity is typically reversible, although it may worsen over 7 to 10 days before the recovery of renal function occurs.

Which is worse for kidneys Tylenol or ibuprofen? ›

Ibuprofen is harder on the kidneys than acetaminophen. Acetaminophen doesn't have the same effect on the COX pathway as ibuprofen. So kidney damage is much more rare. Kidney issues are typically only reported when a person has taken too much acetaminophen.

Does Tylenol raise blood pressure? ›

Regular acetaminophen use increases both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in individuals with hypertension, with an effect similar to that of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories. This rise in blood pressure is seen both in those taking and not taking antihypertensive therapy.

What are 4 warning signs of a damaged liver? ›

Tip-offs to Liver Damage
  • Jaundice or yellowing of the eyes or skin.
  • Pain and distention of the abdomen due to the release of fluid from the liver.
  • Swelling of lower legs due to fluid retention.
  • Confusion or forgetfulness. ...
  • Dark-colored urine.
  • Pale-colored stool.
  • Chronic fatigue.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
9 Nov 2021

What are signs that your liver is struggling? ›

Liver problems
  • Skin and eyes that appear yellowish (jaundice)
  • Abdominal pain and swelling.
  • Swelling in the legs and ankles.
  • Itchy skin.
  • Dark urine color.
  • Pale stool color.
  • Chronic fatigue.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
8 Apr 2022

Which pain reliever is least harmful to the liver? ›

Certain NSAIDs such as diclofenac and naproxen have been associated with hepatotoxicity. Therefore, low-dose acetaminophen (2 grams or less/day on non-consecutive days) is preferred over NSAIDs in patients with chronic liver disease.

Can I take Tylenol every night before bed? ›

It's not a good idea to take it long-term, according to our medical advisors. Tylenol PM contains two medications—the pain reliever acetaminophen and an antihistamine (diphenhydramine) to help with insomnia. High doses of acetaminophen can cause liver damage and the risk increases if you consume alcohol.

Does Tylenol help with anxiety? ›

Results show that acetaminophen can decrease anxiety, however, the researchers emphasize that additional research and studies are required before acetaminophen can be considered an effective and safe treatment for anxiety. Historically, excessive tylenol intake can put a person at risk for liver damage.

Is Tylenol harmful? ›

Taking too much acetaminophen can damage the liver, sometimes leading to a liver transplant or death. The body breaks down most of the acetaminophen in a normal dose and eliminates it in the urine. But some of the drug is converted into a byproduct that is toxic to the liver.

Does Tylenol affect bowel movements? ›

Acetaminophen and Constipation

While Acetaminophen can cause constipation, it is less likely to do so than either opioid medications or NSAIDS. Up to 10% of people taking acetaminophen in therapeutic doses reported constipation as a side effect.

How much is too much acetaminophen a day? ›

Adults should not take more than 3,000 mg of single-ingredient acetaminophen a day. You should take less if you are over 65 years old. Taking more, especially 7,000 mg or more, can lead to a severe overdose problems.

Is it OK to take Tylenol every day for arthritis? ›

Can I take Tylenol Arthritis every day? Yes, but you should be cautious. Acetaminophen, the main ingredient in Tylenol Arthritis, can cause liver damage if taken in large doses.

Why do you lay on your left side for a suppository? ›

Doctors recommend lying on your left side. This takes advantage of the natural angle of the rectum and makes it easier to insert the suppository.

How far do you put a suppository in? ›

Insert the suppository, pointed end first, with your finger until it passes the muscular sphincter of the rectum, about 1/2 to 1 inch in infants and 1 inch in adults. (If not inserted past this sphincter, the suppository may pop out.)

How fast do suppositories work? ›

Take the wrapping off and push a suppository gently into your anus (bottom). Suppositories work quickly (usually between 10 and 45 minutes), so use it when you know you will be near a toilet.

What is the side effect of suppository? ›

Rectal irritation/burning, abdominal discomfort/cramps, or small amounts of mucus in the stool may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Are suppositories safe? ›

Suppositories are usually safe. Yet there can be some problems when you take medicine this way: Some of the medicine might leak back out. Sometimes your body doesn't absorb the drug as well as if you took it by mouth.

Is suppository better than tablets? ›

Conclusions: The suppositories achieved equivalent pain control as oral medication with few side effects and good tolerance. Furthermore, many parents preferred the suppositories to oral medication in maintaining postoperative pain control because of ease of administration.

Can you leave a suppository in overnight? ›

Suppositories are generally used at night because they can take anywhere from 15 minutes to 8 hours to work. 6. Place lubricant on your finger and do a rectal clearing 30 minutes before putting in the suppository.

How long does it take to absorb medicine rectally? ›

Absorption, Distribution, and Excretion

Peak levels after oral administration are reached in 1.5 h, while in rectal administration in 2.5 h.

Will a suppository break up hard stool? ›

Anal suppositories

Following insertion into the rectum, these will draw water into the area to soften the mass of stool.

Is Tylenol suppository safe for babies? ›

Rectal suppositories (FeverAll® or Tempra®) are available for children who have trouble taking medicine by mouth or can't keep medicines down due to vomiting. Tylenol® makes Infants' Tylenol® ("drops") and Children's Tylenol® oral suspensions, as well as Jr.

How long does it take for a Tylenol to kick in? ›

It usually takes around 45 minutes for oral tablets and extended-release tablets to start working when taken on an empty stomach. Oral disintegrating tablets and oral Tylenol liquid start to work in about 20 minutes, while the intravenous acetaminophen takes five to 10 minutes to have an effect.

Can kids take Tylenol rectally? ›

ACETAMINOPHEN is often given to children during surgery for analgesia or antipyresis. When the oral route is not an option, acetaminophen may be administered as a rectal suppository. Several studies have investigated initial rectal dosing of 30, 135, 240, 3,445, 5and 60 mg/kg.

How much Tylenol is too much for children? ›

The toxicity of acetaminophen overdose has long been recognized. Potentially toxic doses are those that are greater than 150 mg/kg/dose in children and greater than 7–10 g/dose in adults. With the advent of many combination analgesic medications, the potential for unintentional overdose has increased.

How often can Tylenol suppositories be given? ›

Acetaminophen Rectal Suppositories (Feverall) Treats fever and pain. Dose every 4-6 hours, not to exceed 5 doses in 24 hours. Do not use under 2 months.

What are the side effects of acetaminophen 500 mg? ›

Side effects of Tylenol include:
  • nausea,
  • stomach pain,
  • loss of appetite,
  • itching,
  • rash,
  • headache,
  • dark urine,
  • clay-colored stools,

Do Tylenol suppositories affect the liver? ›

Warning. Liver problems have happened with the use of acetaminophen. Sometimes, this has led to a liver transplant or death. Most of the time, liver problems happened in people taking more than 4,000 mg (milligrams) of acetaminophen in a day.

How long can you take Tylenol suppositories? ›

After inserting the suppository, if necessary, hold the buttocks together for 30 to 60 seconds to keep the suppository in place. Remain lying down for a few minutes, and avoid having a bowel movement for an hour or longer so the drug will be absorbed.

How long after fever suppository Can I poop? ›

Try to avoid passing stool for up to 60 minutes after inserting the suppository, unless it is a laxative.

Can I drink milk after taking Tylenol? ›

You may take this medicine with milk or food to avoid stomach upset. Do not drink 3 or more alcoholic drinks while you are using this medicine.

What should you not take Tylenol with? ›

Drug interactions of Tylenol include carbamazepine, isoniazid, rifampin, alcohol, cholestyramine, and warfarin.

Can you insert a suppository wrong? ›

An incorrect insertion will subject the patient to an undignified and invasive procedure that is also ineffective. Suppositories need body heat in order to dissolve and become effective - placed in the middle of faecal matter they will remain intact.

How many suppository can I use in a day? ›

1 suppository every 4 to 6 hours up to a maximum of 4 suppositories in 24 hours. Adults + Children 12 years and over: 1 -2 suppositories every 4 to 6 hours up to a maximum of 8 suppositories in 24 hours.

Can you give 2 Tylenol suppositories? ›

For junior-strength suppositories that read 325 mg on the label: Give a dose: 2 suppositories every 4 to 6 hours. Maximum dose: 6 doses in 24 hours.

How quickly does a suppository dissolve? ›

Answer: The length of time it takes for a vaginal suppository to dissolve varies on a number of factors, including your body temperature, the temperature of suppository prior to insertion, and the type of base. On average most suppositories will melt in 10-15 minutes, although it can take up to a half hours.

What are the signs of liver damage from acetaminophen? ›

It is possible to experience acetaminophen poisoning in the form of severe liver damage when too much of the drug has been consumed.
...
Symptoms of liver damage include:
  • Yellowing of skin or eyes.
  • Pain in abdomen.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Fatigue.
  • Excessive sweating.
  • Dark urine and stools.
  • Pale skin color.
13 Sept 2022

How long does it take for Tylenol to cause liver damage? ›

Damage can occur in just 24 hours

“Severe damage could occur if people take more than four grams of acetaminophen in 24 hours,” says Dr. Ke-Qin Hu, a leading liver disease specialist with UCI Health Liver and Pancreas Services.

What organ is Tylenol hard on? ›

TYLENOL® is safe when used as directed, but taking too much acetaminophen can cause liver damage. If you have liver disease, ask your doctor before using TYLENOL®.

Which is safer Tylenol or ibuprofen? ›

In one meta-analysis, ibuprofen was found to be similar to or better than acetaminophen for treating pain and fever in adults and children. Both drugs were also found to be equally safe. One study in the analysis found that acetaminophen is safer with fewer side effects than ibuprofen.

What part of the body itches with liver problems? ›

Symptoms of itching with liver disease

Itching associated with liver disease tends to be worse in the late evening and during the night. Some people may itch in one area, such as a limb, the soles of their feet, or the palms of their hands, while others experience an all-over itch.

What are the 3 signs of a fatty liver? ›

Symptoms
  • Abdominal swelling (ascites)
  • Enlarged blood vessels just beneath the skin's surface.
  • Enlarged spleen.
  • Red palms.
  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice)
22 Sept 2021

Can acetaminophen cause liver damage? ›

Introduction. Acetaminophen is a widely used nonprescription analgesic and antipyretic medication for mild-to-moderate pain and fever. Harmless at low doses, acetaminophen has direct hepatotoxic potential when taken as an overdose and can cause acute liver injury and death from acute liver failure.

Does acetaminophen raise blood pressure? ›

Regular acetaminophen use increases both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in individuals with hypertension, with an effect similar to that of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories. This rise in blood pressure is seen both in those taking and not taking antihypertensive therapy.

What does an allergic reaction to acetaminophen look like? ›

Acetaminophen may rarely cause serious skin reactions. Symptoms may include skin reddening, rash, blisters, and the upper surface of the skin may become separated from the lower layers. Serious skin reactions can occur even if you have taken acetaminophen in the past without any problems.

What are the contraindications of acetaminophen? ›

Contraindications to using acetaminophen include hypersensitivity to acetaminophen, severe hepatic impairment, or severe active hepatic disease.

What are 4 warning signs of a damaged liver? ›

Tip-offs to Liver Damage
  • Jaundice or yellowing of the eyes or skin.
  • Pain and distention of the abdomen due to the release of fluid from the liver.
  • Swelling of lower legs due to fluid retention.
  • Confusion or forgetfulness. ...
  • Dark-colored urine.
  • Pale-colored stool.
  • Chronic fatigue.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
9 Nov 2021

What are signs that your liver is struggling? ›

Liver problems
  • Skin and eyes that appear yellowish (jaundice)
  • Abdominal pain and swelling.
  • Swelling in the legs and ankles.
  • Itchy skin.
  • Dark urine color.
  • Pale stool color.
  • Chronic fatigue.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
8 Apr 2022

Is Tylenol hard on kidneys or liver? ›

Acetaminophen, sold over the counter worldwide to control pain and reduce fever, is not the harmless drug it appears for every patient. It is toxic for those with compromised liver function, and long-term use can cause liver or kidney damage.

Does Tylenol affect heart rate? ›

Over-the-counter pain relievers: Tylenol (acetaminophen) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Motrin, Advil (ibuprofen), and Aleve (naproxen sodium) can increase blood pressure and cause irregular heart rhythms.

What side do you lay on if your blood pressure is high? ›

Sleeping on the left side is the best sleeping position for high blood pressure, as it relieves pressure on the blood vessels that return blood to the heart. These vessels are located on the right side of the body and can be compressed by slowing its circulation if you sleep on your right side.”

Is Tylenol good for your heart? ›

Cardiovascular Disease and Pain Relief. The American Heart Association identifies acetaminophen (TYLENOL®) as a pain relief option to try first* for patients with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease, as it is not known to increase risks of heart attack, heart failure, or stroke.

What is a good replacement for Tylenol? ›

At the drugstore, the most common alternatives to acetaminophen are ibuprofen (brand names Advil and Motrin) and naproxen (brand names Aleve, Naprosyn, and Anaprox). Both of these are part of a class of drugs known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Does acetaminophen make you sleepy? ›

Acetaminophen helps to reduce fever and/or mild to moderate pain (such as headache, backache, aches/pains due to muscle strain, cold, or flu). The antihistamine in this product may cause drowsiness, so it can also be used as a nighttime sleep aid.

Can you take Tylenol on an empty stomach? ›

TYLENOL® will not irritate the stomach the way naproxen sodium (Aleve®1), or even Ibuprofen (Advil®1, MOTRIN®) can. TYLENOL® can help relieve your pain while being gentle on your stomach. TYLENOL® can be taken on an empty stomach.

When should I not take Tylenol? ›

The following conditions are contraindicated with this drug.
...
Conditions:
  1. caloric undernutrition.
  2. acute liver failure.
  3. liver problems.
  4. a condition where the body is unable to maintain adequate blood flow called shock.
  5. acetaminophen overdose.
  6. acute inflammation of the liver due to hepatitis C virus.

Can taking acetaminophen everyday hurt you? ›

It is considered safe to take acetaminophen every day as long as you follow the recommended dosage guidelines of taking it every 4 to 6 hours, only take what you need, and do not exceed the maximum dosage of 4,000 mg per day (note that some experts believe a maximum limit of 3,000 mg per day is safer for those who take ...

How long does it take for acetaminophen to work? ›

You can get acetaminophen as a liquid, chewable tablets, regular tablets or capsules, and suppositories. It comes in different strengths and does not need a prescription. Acetaminophen is used to reduce fever and treat pain. Your child's symptoms should get better in 15 to 30 minutes after taking a dose.

Videos

1. Tylenol Creators Release New Medical Warning on Pill Bottles
(ABC News)
2. ACETAMINOPHEN | TYLENOL: Can you Take Too Much?
(Erik Richardson D.O.)
3. Dosing of rectal Acetaminophen
(DrER.tv)
4. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) | Top 100 Medications
(Ninja Nerd)
5. Acetaminophen / Paracetamol (Tylenol) Nursing Drug Card (Simplified) - Pharmacology
(Nurse Ryan)
6. Paracetamol (Acetaminophen, Tylenol, Panadol, Anadin): Professional Medical Summary - In Depth
(HOW TO MEDICATE)

Top Articles

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Maia Crooks Jr

Last Updated: 12/02/2022

Views: 5911

Rating: 4.2 / 5 (63 voted)

Reviews: 86% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Maia Crooks Jr

Birthday: 1997-09-21

Address: 93119 Joseph Street, Peggyfurt, NC 11582

Phone: +2983088926881

Job: Principal Design Liaison

Hobby: Web surfing, Skiing, role-playing games, Sketching, Polo, Sewing, Genealogy

Introduction: My name is Maia Crooks Jr, I am a homely, joyous, shiny, successful, hilarious, thoughtful, joyous person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.