Understanding the Comedogenic Scale for Oils and Butters (2022)

Understanding the Comedogenic Scale for Oils and Butters (1)

Learn about the comedogenic scale and see where common carrier oils and butters fall - so you know how to pick the right one for your skin type.

With more natural oils and butters available than ever before, it can be difficult to know which ones will work with your skin. One way to navigate the spectrum of products and identify the ones ideal for your skin type is by learning about the components within the oils and how they differ.

Fortunately, there's a cheat sheet called the comedogenic scale, which ranks oils and butters based on their propensity to clog skin pores. Since carrier oils and plant butters are the key ingredients in many cosmetic products, its very helpful to know what effect they are likely to have.

What is the Comedogenic Scale?

The comedogenic scale is ranked by how likely it is that any specific ingredients, such as oils and butters used in cosmetic product formulation, will clog pores. Anyone who is susceptible to acne breakouts and blackheads should avoid highly comedogenic oils, as they are likely to cause recurring acne problems. However, people with drier skin might prefer a more emollient oil toward the middle of the scale.

The scale uses a numbering system of 0 to 5. Here’s how the numbers rank on the scale:

  • 0 - won’t clog pores at all
  • 1 - very low likelihood they will clog pores
  • 2 - moderately low likelihood
  • 3 - moderate likelihood
  • 4 - fairly high likelihood
  • 5 - high likelihood of clogging pores

WHAT DOES NON-COMEDOGENIC MEAN?

Non-comedogenic ingredients are substances that do not clog pores and have a comedogenic rating of 2 or less. And just about any substance with a rating of 5 pretty much guarantees that a person who is prone to acne breakouts will have one. The comedogenic scale below looks at oils and butter in a particular.

Many factors are involved in how a particular oil impacts your skin. So, there is no way to make an “absolute” prediction. Even dermatologists have trouble determining how people's skin will react to things. The fact is, everyone’s skin is different, so an oil will impact different people in different ways.

For example, avocado oil can be a nourishing oil for some people with oily skin while others who also have oily skin will use it and develop more acne breakouts!

Factors that can lead to this variety of results may include things like skin type, illness, water intake, environmental factors, and other things that can influence the way the oils act on your skin.

In addition to an ingredient's comedogenic ranking, the composition of fatty acids is also useful in determining which skin type will benefit from a particular oil. In this guide, we'll look at both types of information.

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A PRIMER ON NON-COMEDOGENIC PRODUCTS

Identifying non-comedogenic skin care products usually involves doing some careful reading of ingredient labels. Single ingredient oils and butters are easy to place. Simply look up where that oil falls on the scale!

Items like lotions and serums are blends of many ingredients. They may often include items both on the low and high end of the scale.

Lotions and creams are blends of oils, alcohols and other ingredients. Emulsifying and emollient ingredients aren't always skin friendly. Some to avoid include Myristyl/Isopropyl Myristate, Isocetyl/Octyl/Isopropyl Stearate, Hexadecyl Alcohol and others Cocoa butter, coconut oil, wheat germ oil and lanolin offer benefits, but are all high on the comedogenic scale, making them less than ideal for facial skincare.

Water-based formulations are less likely to clog pores. But, watch out for certain algae-based ingredients like red algae and algae extract, sulfate cleansers, and laureth! These all place high on the scale.

Also, you might see claims like dermatologist-recommended, hypoallergenic and fragrance-free. These claims don't inherently mean a product is not going to clog pores or will work for your skin type. It's important to know what works for your skin when choosing skincare and makeup products.

In-Depth Comedogenic Scale of Oils and Butters

Name

Comedogenic Rating

Skin Type(s)

Composition

Abyssinian Seed Oil

Most Skin Types

High in Erucic Acid and Moderate in Oleic Acid

Acai Berry Oil

2

Dry, Mature, Irritated

High in Oleic Acid and Moderate in Linoleic Acid

Almond Oil, Sweet

2

Dry, Sensitive, Acne-Prone

High in Oleic Acid

Andiroba Seed Oil

2

Dry, Acne-Prone

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate in Linoleic Acid

Apricot Kernel Oil

2

Combination, Dry

High in Oleic Acid

Argan Oil

Most Skin Types

High in Oleic Acid, Linoleic Acid

Avocado Oil

3

Dry, Acne-Prone

High in Oleic Acid

Babassu Oil

1-2

Most Skin Types

High in Lauric, Myristic and Oleic Acid

Baobob Seed Oil

2

Most Skin Types

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate Linoleic

Black Currant Seed Oil

0-1

Dry, Sensitive

High in Linoleic Acid + GLA and ALA

Blackberry Seed Oil

0-1

Oily

High in Linoleic, Moderate Linolenic Acid

Black Cumin Seed Oil

2

Combination

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate Oleic

Black Raspberry Seed Oil

1-2

Dry, Combination, Acne-Prone

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate Linolenic

Blueberry Seed Oil

0-1

Most Skin Types, especially Oily/Acne-Prone

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate Linolenic & Oleic

Borage Oil

2

Combination, Oily, Sensitive

High in Linoleic Acid and GLA

Brazil Nut Oil

2

Dry, Mature

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate Linoleic

Broccoli Seed Oil

1

(Video) Before You Start Using Oils & Butters on Your Skin…WATCH THIS! Comedogenic Ratings!

Dry, Best for Night/Hair

High in Erucic Acid and Oleic Acid

Buriti Oil

2

Dry, Mature

High in Oleic Acid

Camellia Seed Oil

1

Most Skin Types

High in Oleic Acid

Carrot Seed Oil

3-4

Dry, Mature

High in Oleic Acid

Castor Oil

1

Most Skin Types, including Oily/Acne-Prone

High in Ricinoleic Acid

2

Most Skin Types, especially Dry/Irritated

High in Oleic and Linoleic Acid

Chia Seed Oil

3

Best for Body Use

High in Linolenic

Cloudberry Seed Oil

1

Oily, Acne-Prone

High in Linoleic and Linolenic Acid

Cocoa Butter

4

Ideal for Body/Eye Area, not for Oily/Acne-Prone

High in Oleic and Stearic Acid

Coconut Butter

4

Very Dry, Best for Body Use

High in Oleic, Stearic and Palmitic Acid

Coconut Oil

4

Very Dry, Best for Body Use

High in Lauric Acid

Coconut Oil, Fractionated

2-3

Most Skin Types

High in Caprylic and Capric Acid

Cottonseed Oil

3

Best for Hair or Body

High in Linoleic Acid

Cranberry Seed Oil

2

Dry, Acne-Prone

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in Oleic and Linolenic Acid

Cucumber Seed Oil

1

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid

Date Seed Oil

3

Dry

High in Oleic Acid

Elderberry Seed Oil

1-2

Most Skin Types

High in Linoelic and Linolenic Acid

Emu Oil

1

Most Skin Types

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate in Palmitic Acid

Evening Primrose Oil

2-3

Oily, Acne-Prone, Combination

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in GLA

Flax Seed Oil (Linseed)

4

(Video) Comedogenic Scale - Which Carrier Oil is Right for Your skin type?

Very Dry, Best for Body Use

High in Alpha Linolenic Acid

Guava Seed Oil

1-2

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid

Goji Berry Seed Oil

0-1

Oily

High in Linoleic Acid

Grapeseed Oil

1

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid

Hazelnut Oil

1

Most Skin Types, especially Sensitive, Acne-Prone

High in Oleic Acid

Hemp Seed Oil

Most Skin Types, including Oily/Acne-Prone

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in Linolenic Acid

Jojoba Oil

2

Most Skin Types, including Oily/Acne-Prone

High in Eicosenoic Acid

Karanja Oil

2

Dry, Hair Use

High in Oleic Acid

Kiwi Seed Oil

1

Dry, Flaky, Hair Use

High in Linolenic Acid

Kukui Nut Oil

2

Dry, Flaky, Hair Use

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in Oleic and Linolenic Acid

Lanolin Oil

Very Dry

NA

Macadamia Nut Oil

2-3

Dry

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate in Palmitoleic Acid

Mango Butter

2

Most Skin Types

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate in Stearic Acid

Mango Seed Oil

2

Most Skin Types, particularly Dry

High in Oleic and Stearic Acid

Marula Oil

3-4

Very Dry, Sensitive

High in Oleic Acid

Meadowfoam Seed Oil

1

Oily, Acne-Prone, Sensitive

High in Eicosenoic Acid

Milk Thistle Seed Oil

1

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid

Mineral Oil

Most Skin Types

NA

Mink Oil

3

Dry

High in Oleic Acid

Moringa Oil

3-4

Dry, Combination

High in Oleic Acid

(Video) #shorts / How to choose your oils and butters for lotions. #short diy lotions

Mowrah Butter

na

Most Skin Types, especially Dry/Damaged

High in Oleic and Palmitic Acid

Neem Oil

1-2

Dry, Acne-Prone

High in Oleic Acid

Olive Oil

2

Dry, Acne-Prone

High in Oleic Acid

Papaya Seed Oil

2-3

Dry, Acne-Prone, Sensitive

High in Oleic Acid

Palm Oil

4

Very Dry, Best for Body Use

High in Lauric Acid

Palm Oil, Red

4

Very Dry, Best for Body Use

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate in Palmitic Acid

Passionfruit (Maracuja) Seed Oil

1-2

Oily, Irritated, Acne-Prone

High in Linoleic Acid

Peach Kernel Oil

2

Dry, Sensitive

High in Oleic Acid

Peanut Oil

2

Most Skin Types

High in Oleic and Palmitic Acid

Pecan Oil

2

Dry, Combination

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate in Linoleic Acid

Perilla Oil

1-2

Most Skin Types, especially Dry

High in ALA

Pistachio Oil

na

Most Skin Types, especially Dry/Damaged

High in Oleic and Palmitic Acid

Plum Kernel Oil

1-2

Most Skin Types, especially Mature

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate in Linoleic Acid

Pomegranate Seed Oil

1

Most Skin Types, especially Mature

High in Punicic Acid

Prickly Pear Seed Oil

Most Skin Types, especially Oily/Combination

High in Linoleic Acid

Pumpkin Seed Oil

2

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in Oleic Acid

Red Raspberry Seed Oil

0-1

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in Linolenic Acid

Rice Bran Oil

2

Most Skin Types, especially Mature/Combination

High in Oleic and Linoleic Acid

Rosehip Seed Oil

1

Oily, Acne-Prone

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in Linolenic Acid

(Video) Comedogenic Rating

Safflower Oil (High Linoliec)

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid

Sal Seed Butter

Dry

High in Stearic and Oleic Acid

Sea Buckthorn Oil

1

Most Skin Types, especially Mature/Dry

High in Palmitic, Palmitoleic and Oleic Acid

Sesame Seed Oil

3

Dry, Irritated

High in Linoleic and Oleic Acid

Shea Butter

0-2

Normal, Dry

High in Oleic and Stearic Acid

Shea Oil

0-2

Very Dry

High in Oleic Acid, Moderate in Stearic Acid

Soybean Oil

4-5

Very Dry, Best for Body Use

High in Linoleic Acid

Squalane Oil

0-1

Most Skin Types

High in Omega-2

Strawberry Seed Oil

1

Most Skin Types, especially Oily/Acne-Prone

High in Linoleic and Linolenic Acid

Sunflower Seed Oil

0-2

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid

Tallow

2

Dry

High in Oleic Acid

Tamanu Oil

2

Most Skin Types, especially Scarred/Sensitive

High in Oleic and Linoleic Acid

Tomato Seed Oil

0-2

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in Oleic Acid

Walnut Seed Oil

1-2

Most Skin Types

High in Linoleic Acid, Moderate in Oleic Acid

Watermelon Seed OIl

0-1

Most Skin Types, especially Oily/Acne-Prone/Sensitive

High in Linoleic Acid

Wheat Germ Oil

5

Very Dry/Damaged, Spot Treatment

High in Linolenic Acid

Fatty Acids: The Key Components Inside Oils and Butters

Fatty acids like omega-3 and omega-6 are key to healthy skin. This is not only true for foods rich ion these fatty acids, but in topical applications of products containing them as well. In fact, studies have shown that symptoms of essential fatty acid deficiency can be reversed using products that are rich in linoleic acid.

Topical application may in fact be better than ingesting fatty acids when it comes to skin health. Many fatty acids that are ingested tend to be oxidized in the liver before ever reaching the skin. That makes topical application a more efficient delivery system for this critical acid.

Regardless of your skin type, essential fatty acids are important for skin health even if you don’t have any type of deficiency. For those with healthy skin, topical application of products with fatty acids helps to provide protection from UV radiation and sunburn - a critical step to prevent premature skin aging and wrinkles.

It’s well known that excessive UV radiation exposure can cause cellular damage in the skin, including inflammation as well as immune system suppression in the skin itself. Premature aging is a result of the destruction of collagen in the skin’s cells, and causes a loss of elasticity, which leads to fine lines and wrinkles. Fatty acids in products that are applied to the skin help protect and even can help reverse that damage.

Which Types of Fatty Acids are best?

Vegetable and seed oils have two types of many types of fatty acids, but two are the primary focus for skincare - linoleic acid and oleic acid.

Alpha linoleic acid (an omega-3) and linoleic acid (an omega-6) are both considered "essential fatty acids" because the body cannot produce them on it's own. Oleic acid is produced by the body, so isn't considered "essential".

Knowing the difference between fatty acids and how they interact with skin can help you choose the right product depending on your skin type.

High Linoleic Acid Oils

If you have frequent blemishes or oily skin, you might think you need to use only oil-free products. Not so fast! Research shows that people with acne have low levels of linoleic acid in their skin’s surface lipids. Adding these particular fatty acid-rich oils topically may be the best way to address this problem.

Linoleic acid (C18:2) is an omega-6 essential fatty acid not produced by body. It has anti-aging, barrier protective, soothing, and balancing properties, and is most suitable for oily and acne-prone skin.

  • The highest linoleic acid ratio is found in black cumin, evening primrose, hemp, grapeseed, guava seed, passionfruit, papaya seed, prickly pear, pumpkin seed, red raspberry, rosehip, safflower, sunflower, soybean and wheat germ oil.
  • Borage, castor, cherry kernel, chia, kiwi seed, pomegranate and sesame oils contain high linoleic acid but have more balanced profiles.

High Oleic Acid Oils

Oleic Acid (C18:1) is an omega-9 fatty acid, very hydrating and ideal for drier skin. Oils higher in oleic acid can help with dry and sensitive skin, reducing skin sensitivity. They work effectively to reverse the inflammatory response in various layers of the skin.

  • The highest oleic acid ratio is found in almond, apricot, avocado, carrot seed, hazelnut, macadamia, macula, olive, palm, sea buckthorn and canola oil, as well as cocoa, mango and shea butter.
  • Argan, abyssinian, jojoba, rice bran and tamanu oils contain high oleic acid but have more balanced profiles.

Other Important Fatty Acids

  • Lauric Acid (12:0) - antibacterial and anti-acne properties.
    • Found in babassu, coconut, date seed, and palm oil.
  • Myristic Acid (14:0) - cleansing and lubricating properties.
    • Found in babassu, palm, and coconut oil.
  • Palmitic Acid (C16:0) - soothing, hydrating, anti-aging and barrier-protective properties.
    • High in baobab, brazil nut, macadamia, palm, peanut, rice bran, sea buckthorn and neem oils as well as mowrah butter.
  • Palmitoleic Acid (16:1) - an omega-7 fatty acid with anti-aging, healing, and rejuvenating properties.
    • Found in macadamia and sea buckthorn oil.
  • Stearic Acid (C18:0 ) - rich and hydrating properties but occlusive and tends to clog pores for acne prone skin.
    • Found in cocoa, coconut, mango mowrah, sal and shea butter as well as neem, shea and tamanu oil.
  • Ricinoleic Acid (C18:1) - an omega 9 fatty acid with antibacterial and cleansing properties.
    • Found only in castor oil.
  • Punicic Acid (C18:3) - an omega 5 fatty acid with repairing, anti-inflammatory and antiaging properties.
    • Found ony in pomegranate oil.
  • Alpha-Linolenic Acid/ALA (C18:3) - an omega 3 and an essential fatty acid that helps skin barrier health.
    • Found in black currant, perilla, flax/linseed, pumpkin seed, and soybean oil.
  • Gamma-Linolenic Acid / GLA (18:3) - an omega 6 fatty acid that soothes inflammation and promotes ceramide synthesis.
    • Found in black currant seed, borage, and evening primrose oil.
  • Eicosenoic Acid (20:1) - an omega 9 with soothing emollient and permeation enhancing properties.
    • High in jojoba and meadowfoam seed oil.
  • Behenic Acid (22:0) - restorative, very moisturizing and conditioning properties, especially for hair.
    • Found in karanja and mooring oils.
  • Erucic Acid (22:1) - an omega 9 with a silky/silicone like feel for light hydration.
    • High in abyssinian and broccoli oil, moderate in jojoba and meadow foam seed oils.

Clogged Pores - What You Need to Know

Now that we’ve discussed how comedogenic oils clog pores, let’s take a look at how that impacts your skin. The main result of clogged pores is acne. But instead of trying to treat the acne when it happens, let’s look at ways to prevent it from occurring in the first place.

A clogged pore or comedo (plural is comedones) results in a whitehead or blackhead developing, which is a result of inflammation of the skin. The clogged pores cause the development of acne, which happens when the skin’s sebaceous glands start to secrete oil.

This usually happens around puberty and is often triggered by hormones. Dead skin cells, which the body expels normally, can also causes pores to clog.

It’s interesting to note that clogged pores can negatively impact the skin even after the pimple is gone and the acne is resolved. When acne continually returns, pores can be dilated, causing other pores to clog, resulting in more blockage and acne.

Oily skin is a breeding ground of bacteria, which is found on all skin types. Adding comedogenic oils exacerbates the acne, and slows the process of clearing. Treating clogged pores and acne is critical, because untreated severe acne can cause scarring.

Products containing oils along with other non comedogenic ingredients are good for people who have oily skin. If you have oily skin, avoid oils that tend to clog pores on your face, like coconut oil, wheat germ oil, and others that are high in oleic fatty acids.

Oils that are good to use if you have oily skin include grape seed oil, rosehip, evening primrose, jojoba, and others that are high in linoleic fatty acids.

Using the Comedogenic Scale for Your Skin Type

One of the keys to determining which ingredients on the comedogenic scale to use without doubt is to know your skin type. There are five main skin types, which include normal, dry, oily, sensitive, and combination skin.

A lot of this rating is subjective, because there is no scientific classification of skin types. It’s based on observation and subjective evaluation. Since there are so many different types and needs, it's important to try different things out and find what your skin prefers. Use products for at least a month to evaluate how your skin reacts.

NORMAL SKIN

Normal skin isn’t particularly dry or oily. The pores are usually small; the skin isn’t shiny or flaky and tends not to crack. Usually, there are few wrinkles or lines.

If you have normal skin, you should use products that don’t strip natural oils from your skin. Instead, they should hydrate, thereby helping to reduce lines and wrinkles. Cleansers should clean effectively without harsh chemicals.

  • With normal skin, key considerations are lightweight hydration and maintaining the skin's balance. An oil balanced in oleic and lineoic fatty acids is ideal.
  • Top oils for normal skin include argan oil, grapeseed oil, hemp seed oil, jojoba oil, cherry kernel oil, mango butter, pomegranate oil, safflower oil, sea buckthorn oil, squalane, sunflower oil, and shea butter.

DRY SKIN

Dry skin causes people to feel tightness in their skin, and the skin is often scaly or has patches that are flaky. People with dry skin usually have pores that are almost invisible. There are many factors that cause dry skin, from heredity and genetics to the amount of sebum produced in the skin.

If you have dry skin, it’s essential to moisturize regularly in your skin care routine. You’ll also need to avoid harsh cleansers, limit your time and frequency in a hot shower, use a good humidifier in your home, and consider using products containing humectants like hyaluronic acid, as that is a moisture magnet for the skin.

  • Those with dry skin should use oils that are high in oleic acid, as it helps reduce inflammation.
  • Top picks include olive oil, avocado oil, almond oil, hazelnut oil, olive oil, moringa oil, neem oil, perilla oil, pistachio oil and argan oil.
  • If your skin is extremely dry, consider shea, mango, cocoa and kokum butter.

OILY SKIN

Oily skin is often marked by a a shine on the face, sometimes paired with severe cases of acne breakouts. If you have oily skin, it may be due to genetics or you may have frequent hormonal changes. You also produce an excessive amount of sebum, which is usually triggered by hormones.

Unfortunately, those with oily skin are prone to acne episodes that may include whiteheads, blackheads, and pustules. Skin may appear shiny most of the time. On the positive side, if you have oily skin you get a boost when it comes to signs of aging. You’ll have less wrinkles and your skin will seem to age more slowly!

Even though it may seem contradictory, if you have oily skin you’ll still need to use a moisturizer. Otherwise, you skin may start producing extra sebum, which could make acne worse.

  • Oils that have high levels of linoleic acid are most appropriate for oily skin.
  • Best bets include blackberry seed oil, blueberry seed oil, goji berry oil, hemp seed oil, jojoba oil, safflower oil, evening primrose oil, grape seed oil, strawberry seed oil, watermelon seed oil, and rosehip oil.

SENSITIVE SKIN

Redness, itching, burning, and overly dry skin are hallmarks of sensitive skin. Those with sensitive skin may experience bouts of rosacea, contact dermatitis, and other skin ailments. Avoid common irritants like the too-harsh sulfates found in most shampoos and soaps, products with noticeable fragrances and harsh acids.

(Video) Refined vs Unrefined - Oils & Butters!

  • Pure oils can be great simple moisturizers for sensitive skin since there are no additives or fragrances to contend with.
  • For dry sensitive skin, consider almond oil, black currant seed oil, marula oil, papaya seed oil, peach kernel oil, and tamanu oil.
  • For oily sensitive skin, try borage oil, grapeseed oil, hazelnut oil, meadowfoam seed oil or watermelon seed oil.

COMBINATION SKIN

Combination skin may show up as dry and flaky on one part of your skin - and oily on another. This skin type has two different types of needs, and is probably the most common skin type.

If you have a combination skin type, it’s going to be hard to find a single moisturizer that meets your needs. You’ll probably need to use two types, one for your oily areas and one for the dry, flaky areas of your skin. And for those with combination skin types, be sure to exfoliate once a week in order to keep your pores unclogged.

  • For those with combination skin types, using oils with properties that address both dry skin and oily skin is key.
  • Oils beneficial for both types include apricot kernel oil, black cumin seed oil, black raspberry seed oil, borage seed oil, evening primrose oil, moringa oil, pecan oil, prickly pear oil, rice bran oil and argan oil.
  • Jojoba oil is a very popular choice for all skin types, as it reduces inflammation, helps to break up clogged pores, and works to reduce sebum production.

Put Your Comedogenic Scale Knowledge to Work

Hopefully this overview on the comedogenic scale and how it applies to your particular skin type will help you choose skincare products that are appropriate to use. Using the comedogenic scale for oils and butters is your best way to find the right products that will help prevent clogged pores and the resulting problems like acne.

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FAQs

How does the comedogenic scale work? ›

The comedogenic scale is designed to determine how likely a cosmetic is to clog pores. The scale ranks from 0 – which means won't clog pores at all – to 5, which is high likelihood of clogging pores.

Which butter is least comedogenic? ›

The answer is simple. Shea butter is non-comedogenic. This means that it won't clog pores or cause acne.

Which oil is most comedogenic? ›

The most common pore-clogging oil is coconut oil, but the experts also flag palm, soybean, wheat germ, flaxseed, and even some ester oils, like myristyl myristate, as comedogenic.

Which oils have a comedogenic rating of 0? ›

Rating: Argan oil has a rating of 0 on the comedogenic scale, meaning it has no chances of clogging pores. It is suitable for all skin types.

Does butyrospermum parkii butter clog pores? ›

The short answer: yes, shea butter can clog pores. While everyone's skin is different, It's likely to cause breakouts.

How do you know if a product is comedogenic? ›

Skingredients is a free online tool to check for the presence of comedogenic ingredients in products that you see on shopping websites and skin care / makeup review websites. Such websites often provide a list of ingredients of the product.

Is the comedogenic scale accurate? ›

A quick Google search for "comedogenic ratings" will turn up the oft used comedogenic scale, with 0 being an ingredient that won't clog pores on up to 5, which is an ingredient that will clog pores. Not only is this system outdated, it's inaccurate.

How is Comedogenicity determined? ›

To determine the comedogenic rate of a single plant oil, look at the total concentration of Oleic acid; the highest Oleic acid % means higher comedogenic value. Thick oils do not equal high comedogenicity; it's down to the fatty acid composition.

What is the comedogenic rating of shea butter? ›

Generally, shea butter is believed to have a rating between 0 and 2 out of 5 where 0 means it won't clog pores and 2 means a moderately low likelihood. However, again, this is not proven. To get a better idea of the answer to can shea butter cause acne, we can look at its constituents.

Is shea butter a comedogenic? ›

"Many acne-prone patients are worried about excessive moisturizing, fearing it will clog the pores," notes Chang. "Shea butter is non-comedogenic and should not clog the pores."

Does bacuri butter clog pores? ›

It is considered the most non-clogging butter and suitable for all skin types. If you are formulating for a severely dry skin, you can use Cocoa butter, Bacuri butter, Cupuacu butter and Ucuuba butter. Add your favorite essential oils for a more therapeutic experience!

Is Avocado oil comedogenic rating? ›

The truth is that avocado has a comedogenic rating of “2”. This means that it's somewhat likely to clog pores. So, if you have oily or acne-prone skin, it's better to avoid avocado oil. There are other products, like castor oil, which are completely non-comedogenic.

What is the least comedogenic oil? ›

List of noncomedogenic oils
  • Grapeseed oil. Grapeseed oil varies in color, based on the type of grapes it's derived from. ...
  • Sunflower seed oil. Light and thin in texture, sunflower seed oil can be used effectively as a carrier oil, or on its own. ...
  • Neem oil. ...
  • Hempseed oil. ...
  • Sweet almond oil.

What is the comedogenic rating of kokum butter? ›

Also, remember that Kokum butter's comedogenic rating is 0-1 so it can be safely used on the face. You wouldn't want to use cocoa butter on your face because it has a comedogenic rating of 4 and is likely to clog pores.

Is coconut oil comedogenic rating? ›

Coconut oil, which is pretty high in the comedogenic rating (4: severely comedogenic), has been quite a popular makeup removal oil for a while now. If you are experiencing clogged pores after using it for a while, you might need to watch out as this might be the culprit.

What is the comedogenic rating of vitamin E oil? ›

This vitamin E rich oil is non-comedogenic, antibacterial, and is also an antioxidant. With a comedogenic rating of 2, this non-comedogenic oil is often seen as the holy grail of acne-friendly facial oils.

What is the comedogenic rating of rosemary oil? ›

With its potent antibacterial qualities, rosemary essential oil helps fight the acne bacteria from getting into your pores. This quality, combined with rosemary oil's non-comedogenic properties, means that acne has no foothold as the oil both clears out pores and forms a protective barrier against future breakouts.

Which butter is best for acne prone skin? ›

Mango butter has an almost undetectable scent. It's also non-comedogenic, making it a good choice for congested and acne-prone skin.

Is butyrospermum Parkii safe? ›

Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Oil (sheanut oil), from which many of the ingredients of this report are derived, is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) in the U.S. as a direct food additive (21CFR§184.1702). It is used in confections and frostings, coatings of soft candy, and sweet sauces and toppings.

Is Avocado oil non comedogenic? ›

Avocado Oil As A Face Moisturizer

Particularly if you have dry to normal skin, this ingredient can be a godsend for your skin. As previously discussed, the oil is moderately comedogenic but highly nutritious, so people with acne-prone and oily skin can also sometimes benefit from it.

What brands are non-comedogenic? ›

The best non-comedogenic foundation as reviewed by our in-house beauty expert
  • Giorgio Armani Luminous Silk Foundation. ...
  • L'Oréal Paris True Match Liquid Foundation with SPF and Hyaluronic Acid. ...
  • Yves Saint Laurent All Hours Foundation SPF 20. ...
  • Laura Mercier Flawless Fusion Ultra-Longwear Foundation. ...
  • NARS Sheer Glow Foundation.
13 Sept 2022

Is jojoba oil Noncomedogenic? ›

It's noncomedogenic

Although jojoba oil is a botanical substance, its makeup is so similar to the oil (sebum) your body naturally produces that your skin can't tell the difference. This makes it less likely to build up on your skin and clog your pores, leading to fewer breakouts and less severe acne.

How comedogenic is beeswax? ›

To answer the simple question as to whether beeswax clogs pores or not, the answer is no. Despite some of the rumors out there, beeswax does not clog pores. Yes, it is an oil/wax based product and some of those types of substances do clog pores but, beeswax is not one of them.

What is the comedogenic rating of rosehip oil? ›

Also with a rating of 1 on the comedogenic scale, rosehip seed oil is a wonderful carrier oil in natural skincare products. Rich in vitamin C, it works well as an anti-inflammatory oil that helps reduce redness, calm rosacea, and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.

What makes an ingredient comedogenic? ›

Substances that can cause comedones, or blocked pores, are known as “comedogenic.” Some examples of noncomedogenic ingredients include aloe vera, vitamin C, and glycerin. Some comedogenic ingredients found in cosmetics include cocoa butter, lanolin, coconut oil, and wheat germ oil.

Is extra virgin olive oil comedogenic? ›

Yes and no. While olive oil will lock in moisture and hydrate your skin, it is also comedogenic, meaning it can easily harbor bacteria and clog your pores.

What is the comedogenic rating of hemp seed oil? ›

Not only does hemp seed oil's comedogenic rating of zero make it ideal for all skin types, but also there's research that suggests it's promising for acne-related inflammatory skin issues.

Is coconut fruit extract comedogenic? ›

Another coconut-derived ingredient that we use in our formulations is Coconut fruit extract. Coconut extract doesn't act or have the same fatty acid/lipid composition as coconut oil and is non-comedogenic for ALL skin types.

Does raw shea butter cause breakouts? ›

If you have acne prone skin, shea butter could cause breakouts. While some shea butter brands claim the ingredient is noncomedogenic (meaning it doesn't clog pores), there are no studies that support this. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, shea butter could clog your pores, and in turn, cause breakouts.

What is the comedogenic rating of tea tree oil? ›

1 (Not to mention that, unlike many other essential oils, it's non-comedogenic and won't clog pores, adds Nazarian).

Is shea butter an occlusive? ›

Some occlusives, such as petrolatum and shea butter (yes, shea butter is a good occlusive!), are multitaskers that can smooth and soften skin, acting as emollients, another type of moisturizing agent.

What's the difference between refined and unrefined shea butter? ›

Unrefined shea butter is in its natural form and retains all of its vitamins, nutrients, and healing properties. However, it does have an unpleasant texture and smell. Refined shea butter is smoother and easier to apply with no smell but during the refining process, many of its vitamins and nutrients are lost.

Is shea butter high in linoleic acid? ›

Shea butter contains high levels of linoleic acid and oleic acid. These two acids balance each other out. That means shea butter is easy for your skin to fully absorb and won't make your skin look oily after application.

Does Cupuacu butter clog pores? ›

Cupuaçu butter is a type of moisturizer that isn't overly occlusive, says Day, meaning it won't clog pores or cause breakouts. It also has anti-inflammatory properties and can even help provide some protection against sun damage (though Day cautions that you should always, always use sunscreen).

What is Muru Muru butter? ›

What Is Murumuru Butter? Murumuru butter is derived from murumuru nuts, which fall from astrocaryum murumuru, a palm tree found in the Amazon. “Murumuru butter is rich in fatty acids, including lauric acid and myristic acid, which helps to support the natural skin barrier and prevent moisture loss,” Garshick explains.

What is bacuri butter good for? ›

Bacuri butter for hair growth

Works as an excellent emollient to protect, lubricate, and moisturize both skin and hair. Contributes to scalp health as it contains antioxidants that help to fight signs of aging, reduce redness, and eliminate blemishes.

What is Ucuuba butter? ›

Description: Native to Central and South America, Ucuuba Butter is a natural butter cold pressed from the seeds of the Ucuuba tree producing a light brown, hard and dry consistency butter.

Is rosehip seed oil non comedogenic? ›

Rosehip oil

Rosehip oil is another great non-comedogenic oil for the face that people with oily and acne-prone skin can consider using.

Which oils are high in linoleic acid? ›

Linoleic acid is the predominant n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in the Western diet and we can obtain it from vegetable oils such as sunflower, safflower, soybean, corn, and canola oils as well as nuts and seeds.

Can Vaseline clog your pores? ›

However, according to Vaseline's company website, Vaseline is noncomedogenic, meaning that it will not clog or block pores. Nonetheless, people who have oily or acne-prone skin may not like the greasy feeling that Vaseline leaves on the skin.

Is Aloe Vera non-comedogenic? ›

Aloe vera is super light and easily absorbed by the skin, which helps to lock in moisture. Since it is non-comedogenic, it doesn't add oil or clog pores for those with oily skin, which means it works for all skin types.

Is argan oil Noncomedogenic? ›

Argan oil is non-comedogenic and won't clog pores. In fact, it's safe to use on oily or acne-prone skin. Does argan oil brighten skin? Argan oil is rich in antioxidants that help protect against environmental damage, like polyphenols and vitamin E.

What is cupuaçu butter? ›

Cupuacu butter is extracted from the Cupuacu seed which is obtained from a tree that grows in the Amazon rainforests of some countries in South America like Brazil. It is related to the family of cocoa butter and has a characteristic aroma that slightly resembles that of cocoa butter.

Is mango butter Noncomedogenic? ›

It's generally non-comedogenic

It doesn't contain compounds that are known to irritate skin, even if yours is sensitive. One exception: If you experience acne, you may want to avoid using mango butter on your face — more on that below.

Is cocoa butter Noncomedogenic? ›

Cocoa butter's molecules are packed very tight together, which makes it very comedogenic (pore-clogging). Oils that are less comedogenic include olive oil, almond oil, and apricot oil.

Is shea butter Noncomedogenic? ›

As a whole, shea butter is not official classified as non-comedogenic. Not enough scientific research has been conducted to establish the comedogenicity of shea butter. However, due to the consistency of shea butter, academic establishments hold the opinion that shea butter is likely comedogenic.

Is mango butter Noncomedogenic? ›

It's generally non-comedogenic

It doesn't contain compounds that are known to irritate skin, even if yours is sensitive. One exception: If you experience acne, you may want to avoid using mango butter on your face — more on that below.

Is cocoa butter Noncomedogenic? ›

Cocoa butter's molecules are packed very tight together, which makes it very comedogenic (pore-clogging). Oils that are less comedogenic include olive oil, almond oil, and apricot oil.

Does kokum butter clog pores? ›

Kokum butter has a strong moisturizing capacity and is considered non-comedogenic, which means it won't clog your pores. Thus, it may be effective for restoring moisture to dry, irritated skin and is unlikely to make your breakouts worse in the process.

How do you know if ingredients are comedogenic? ›

It's usually presented as a table that assigns common skin-care ingredients a number from 0-3 or 0-5. The higher the number, the more likely that ingredient is to clog pores; anything rated a 0, 1, or 2 is generally considered “noncomedogenic.” So if you avoid anything higher than 2, you won't break out.

Why is shea butter comedogenic? ›

Shea butter is rich in fatty acids and has a very oily texture and this is enough to clog pores and breakout acne-prone skin.

Which butter is best for acne-prone skin? ›

Mango butter has an almost undetectable scent. It's also non-comedogenic, making it a good choice for congested and acne-prone skin.

Is mango butter less greasy than shea butter? ›

Mango butter has an advantage as it doesn't look as greasy in hair as shea butter. It also has a lower melting point so can be easier to apply to hair in cooler climates. Even better is to make a combined mango shea butter and apply this to your hair, getting all the benefits of both.

Is coconut oil comedogenic rating? ›

Coconut oil, which is pretty high in the comedogenic rating (4: severely comedogenic), has been quite a popular makeup removal oil for a while now. If you are experiencing clogged pores after using it for a while, you might need to watch out as this might be the culprit.

What is the comedogenic rating of kokum butter? ›

Also, remember that Kokum butter's comedogenic rating is 0-1 so it can be safely used on the face. You wouldn't want to use cocoa butter on your face because it has a comedogenic rating of 4 and is likely to clog pores.

Is jojoba butter comedogenic? ›

Oils rich (30% - 50%) in Linoleic acid, with very low comedogenicity: Argan, Jojoba, Prickly Pear, Sea Buckthorn, Shea butter, Mango butter, Cacay, Chia, Moringa, Neem, Plum, Pumpkin, Rice Bran, S.

Is Palmer's cocoa butter comedogenic? ›

Benefits: Natural Cocoa Butter, Retinol and Vitamin E promote softer, smoother skin overnight. Nightly use leaves skin looking more radiant, youthful and healthy. Non-comedogenic.

Is Avocado oil non-comedogenic? ›

Avocado Oil As A Face Moisturizer

Particularly if you have dry to normal skin, this ingredient can be a godsend for your skin. As previously discussed, the oil is moderately comedogenic but highly nutritious, so people with acne-prone and oily skin can also sometimes benefit from it.

What is Illipe butter good for? ›

Illipe Butter is high in Vitamins A and E, which are known to soothe and hydrate the scalp and hair. They help stimulate the production of healthy sebum and shield the hair and scalp from external aggressors to keep the hair from drying out and breaking off.

What is cupuacu butter? ›

Cupuacu butter is extracted from the Cupuacu seed which is obtained from a tree that grows in the Amazon rainforests of some countries in South America like Brazil. It is related to the family of cocoa butter and has a characteristic aroma that slightly resembles that of cocoa butter.

Which is more moisturizing shea butter or mango butter? ›

While mango butter is softer than shea and cocoa butter, it contains more fatty acids making it a more intense moisturizer. It has little to no odor and being rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, it helps ease dry skin conditions and slows down degeneration of skin cells.

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