What Is Undifferentiated Schizophrenia? (2022)

Undifferentiated schizophrenia is a type of schizophrenia that is diagnosed when an individual meets the criteria for diagnosis of schizophrenia but cannot be classified into any of the five defined subtypes. People who are diagnosed with undifferentiated schizophrenia exhibit symptoms of more than one type of schizophrenia.

What Is Undifferentiated Schizophrenia? (1)

Definition of Undifferentiated Schizophrenia?

Schizophrenia is a mental health condition that interferes with a person's perception of reality. Previously, schizophrenia was divided into five subtypes as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), which is published by the American Psychiatric Association.

The five subtypes of schizophrenia:

  • Paranoid: Positive symptoms like delusions and hallucinations are most dominant.
  • Hebephrenic/disorganized: Cognitive and negative symptoms, such as disorganized thought, disorganized speech, and flat affect are most dominant.
  • Residual: A person meets the criteria for a diagnosis of schizophrenia, but the symptoms are in a milder form.
  • Catatonic: A person meets the criteria for schizophrenia and has additional symptoms of catatonia (excessive movement or decreased movement).
  • Undifferentiated: A person exhibits the symptoms of more than one subtype of schizophrenia, but does not exhibit enough symptoms of one subtype to be classified as that subtype.

The most recent edition of the DSM (DSM-5) no longer includes these subtypes as distinct conditions because they were believed to have low validity and reliability in terms of diagnosis.

The five subtypes are still used by some clinicians as a way to understand how an individual's experience with schizophrenia is manifesting, and as a guide for discussing prognosis and tailoring treatment for each person.

Symptoms

For a diagnosis of any type of schizophrenia, a person must exhibit at least two of the following symptom types, with at least one of the symptoms being delusions, hallucinations, or disorganized speech.

The symptoms include:

  • Delusions
  • Hallucinations
  • Disorganized speech (e.g., frequent derailment or incoherence)
  • Grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior
  • Negative symptoms (i.e., diminished emotional expression or avolition).

Symptoms must persist for at least six months and must cause significant difficulties in the level of functioning in one or more major life areas, such as work, interpersonal relations, or self-care.

Symptoms Are Not Static

Symptoms of schizophrenia do not always occur all at the same time, and can change over time.

People with undifferentiated schizophrenia can experience positive, negative, and/or cognitive symptoms, but their symptom pattern does not fit neatly into one of the other schizophrenia subtypes.

Positive Symptoms

This refers to behaviors and beliefs that are not normally present in healthy people.

Positive symptoms include:

(Video) Explaining Undifferentiated Schizophrenia

  • Hallucinations: A sensory experience that is not real, such as hearing voices, or seeing things that are not there.
  • Delusions: Erroneous but firmly held beliefs, despite concrete evidence that disputes the belief or a lack of factual evidence to back up the belief. This might include thinking people on TV are sending special messages or it could involve paranoia, such as thinking people are spying on them or "out to get them".
  • Thought disorder: Unusual thinking or disorganized speech.
  • Catatonia or other movement disorders: Excessive movement or decreased movement.

Negative Symptoms

Negative symptoms refer to an absence of behaviors that are considered normal.

Negative symptoms include:

  • Loss of motivation
  • Social withdrawal
  • Lack of interest or enjoyment in activities
  • "Flat affect," reduced facial expression and/or vocal intonation
  • Difficulty expressing emotion
  • Difficulty planning activities
  • Difficulty beginning and sustaining activities
  • Reduced feelings of pleasure
  • Reduced speaking

Cognitive Symptoms

Cognitive symptoms include substantial challenges with thinking skills.

Cognitive symptoms include:

  • Problems with attention
  • Difficulty concentrating or focusing
  • Impaired memory, such as remembering appointments
  • Diminished ability to process information
  • Problems with decision making
  • Difficulty learning and using information

Diagnosis

To determine if a person has schizophrenia, a mental health professional will consider several factors and diagnostic tests.

Examination

During an examination, a healthcare provider will:

  • Ask about symptoms
  • Review the person's medical history
  • Review the person's family medical history
  • Perform a physical examination
  • Rule out other conditions besides schizophrenia

Lab Tests

There is no lab test that confirms or rules out a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Blood, urine, or other lab tests may be ordered to identify other possible conditions that may explain the person's symptoms.

Depending on the situation, a healthcare provider may order a blood or urine test to identify the presence of medications or illicit drugs that could be causing the symptoms.

Imaging Tests

A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or a computerized tomography (CT) may be ordered if there is concern that there could be an underlying physical cause for the symptoms, such as a brain tumor.


Once a diagnosis of schizophrenia is established, if the symptoms match more than one subtype but do not meet the criteria for any single subtype, a diagnosis of undifferentiated schizophrenia may be made. In this sense, the classification of undifferentiated schizophrenia is made through a process of elimination.

Causes

The specific cause of schizophrenia, and by extension undifferentiated schizophrenia, is not known, but there are several risk factors.

Age

While undifferentiated schizophrenia can occur at any age, symptoms usually begin during the age range of the late teens to the early thirties.

Genetics

Undifferentiated schizophrenia appears to run in families. Having schizophrenia in the family does not mean a person will develop schizophrenia, but it increases the risk.

Compared to the 1% prevalence of schizophrenia in the general population, there is a 10% prevalence among people who have a biological parent or sibling with schizophrenia. The highest risk is associated with identical twins.

(Video) Undifferentiated Schizophrenia

Having a second-degree relative such as an aunt, uncle, grandparent, or cousin who has schizophrenia also increases a person's chances of developing the condition.

It is likely that multiple genes are involved in the development of schizophrenia.

Environment

It is believed that the interaction between genetics and environmental factors influences the development of undifferentiated schizophrenia.

Some environmental risk factors include:

  • Living in poverty
  • Living with stress
  • Prenatal exposure to viruses or pathogens
  • Prenatal malnutrition
  • History of abuse or neglect

Substance Use

Drugs do not independently cause undifferentiated schizophrenia, but some drugs have been linked to an increased risk of schizophrenia in those who are susceptible.

Schizophrenia is linked most closely with use of:

  • Cannabis
  • Cocaine
  • LSD
  • Amphetamines

Research has shown a link between excessive use of cannabis by adolescents and the subsequent development of schizophrenia.

Brain Chemistry

Dysfunctions of the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, and epinephrine have been linked to undifferentiated schizophrenia.

More specifically, excessive dopamine activity is linked to hallucinations, agitation, and delusions, while abnormalities in norepinephrine are linked to negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia.

Brain Physiology

Differences in brain structure and function are believed to play a part in undifferentiated schizophrenia.

For example:

  • Differences in the volumes of specific components of the brain
  • Differences in the way regions of the brain are connected and interact

These brain differences may begin before birth. Schizophrenia or other forms of psychosis may be triggered by changes to the brain during puberty in those who are susceptible due to genetics, environmental factors, or brain differences.

Treatment

Treatment options for schizophrenia can vary from person to person. Available treatment options are outlined below.

Medication

Medication, particularly antipsychotics, is the most common treatment for undifferentiated schizophrenia.

Antipsychotic medications can be taken in pill or liquid form, or by injection.

(Video) Schizophrenia part-4(CATATONIC,PSD.,RESIDUAL,UNDIFFERENTIATED AND PARANOID SCHIZO.)

Some antipsychotics include:

  • Zyprexa (olanzapine)
  • Risperdal (risperidone)
  • Seroquel (quetiapine)
  • Geodon (ziprasidone)
  • Abilify (aripiprazole)
  • Invega (paliperidone)

Side effects of antipsychotics may include:

  • Weight gain
  • Dry mouth
  • Restlessness
  • Drowsiness

Some people may be prescribed mood stabilizers such as:

  • Lithobid (lithium)
  • Depakote (divalproex sodium)
  • Tegretol (carbamazepine)
  • Lamictal (lamotrigine)

In some cases, people with undifferentiated schizophrenia may be prescribed antidepressants such as:

  • Prozac (fluoxetine)
  • Zoloft (sertraline)
  • Paxil (paroxetine)
  • Celexa (citalopram)
  • Lexapro (escitalopram)
  • Effexor (venlafaxine)
  • Pristiq (desvenlafaxine)
  • Cymbalta (duloxetine)
  • Wellbutrin (bupropion)

Never Go "Cold Turkey"

Stopping psychiatric medication abruptly can be dangerous. Always consult your healthcare provider before stopping your medication or changing your medication plan.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of ongoing therapy that can be effective for treating many psychiatric conditions.

With CBT, people who have undifferentiated schizophrenia can learn to identify maladaptive thought patterns and learn how to challenge them, and change the thoughts and their accompanying behaviors.

Family Education and Support

These programs are geared towards the family members and close friends of people who have schizophrenia. They aim to help loved ones understand the condition, learn ways to support the person who has undifferentiated schizophrenia, and find support for themselves.

These programs can be done individually, as a family, or as a group with other families.

Coordinated Specialty Care

This type of treatment involves a team of specialists working together to provide help such as:

  • Psychotherapy
  • Medication management
  • Case management
  • Employment and education support
  • Family education and support

It may be particularly helpful for people in an early stage of schizophrenia called first-episode psychosis.

Assertive Community Treatment (ACT)

ACT aims to reduce the number of hospitalizations for people with undifferentiated schizophrenia and to decrease the number of people without housing.

It involves:

  • A multidisciplinary team, including a medication prescriber
  • A shared caseload among team members
  • Direct service provided by team members
  • A high frequency of contact with the person who has schizophrenia
  • A low ratio between staff and the people with schizophrenia
  • Outreach to people with schizophrenia in the community

Social Skills Training

This treatment uses rehearsing or role-playing real-life situations to help a person with undifferentiated schizophrenia re-learn how to act and interact appropriately in social settings.

(Video) Undifferentiated Schizophrenia

Supported Employment

This program helps people with undifferentiated schizophrenia enter the workforce with support, such as assistance with constructing resumes, preparing for job interviews, and connecting them with employers who hire and support people with mental illness.

Substance Use Treatment

Excessive substance use can make undifferentiated schizophrenia symptoms worse. Up to 50% of people with schizophrenia have substance use disorders. Substance use treatment is often a part of the treatment program for undifferentiated schizophrenia.

Help Is Available

If you or a loved one are struggling with substance use or addiction, contact theSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helplineat1-800-662-4357for information on support and treatment facilities in your area.

For more mental health resources, see thisNational Helpline Database.

Coping

Schizophrenia is a life-long condition, so finding coping strategies is important.

Some helpful tips for those living with undifferentiated schizophrenia include:

  • With the help of professionals, create and maintain a treatment plan.
  • If prescribed medication, take it regularly as directed and do not stop without consulting a healthcare provider.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Consulting with a dietitian may be helpful.
  • Get plenty of exercise. Exercise is good for both physical and mental health.
  • Manage and minimize stress with techniques such as relaxation, knowing and respecting your limits, and managing your emotions.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Avoid substances like alcohol, drugs, and smoking.
  • Speak with a healthcare provider about changing or adjusting medications if you are not noticing improvement or if your medications are causing bothersome side effects.
  • Set goals and work towards them.

Finding Support

Living with undifferentiated schizophrenia is difficult to do alone. Having the support of others can make treatment and management of undifferentiated schizophrenia more effective, and make life with schizophrenia more enjoyable.

Some ways to find support include:

  • Reaching out to trusted friends, family, and loved ones
  • Joining activities or groups involving things you enjoy such as sports, volunteering, or hobbies
  • Joining local clubs or organizations
  • Finding a living environment that makes you feel safe and supports your needs, whether that means living alone, community or supportive living, living with friends or family, or something else
  • Contacting support services in your area

Online Support Groups Can Be A Great Resource

A Word From Verywell

Undifferentiated schizophrenia can be hard to recognize and difficult to live with, but with proper support and treatment, it can be manageable.

If you are experiencing symptoms of undifferentiated schizophrenia, book an appointment to see your healthcare provider or a mental health professional to get a proper diagnosis, and find a treatment plan that works for you.

(Video) Clinical psychology Features and symptoms of Schizophrenia

FAQs

What is undifferentiated schizophrenia? ›

Undifferentiated schizophrenia is an outdated term describing a subtype of schizophrenia that the medical community no longer recognizes. People who are experiencing signs of psychosis, such as delusions, hallucinations, or drastic changes in behavior, speech, or mobility, should talk with a mental health professional.

When is the diagnosis of undifferentiated schizophrenia used? ›

A diagnosis of undifferentiated schizophrenia was made when the symptoms did not fit in with any of the other former subtypes of schizophrenia. Among other symptoms, a person must have delusions, hallucinations, or disorganized speech to receive a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

How common is undifferentiated schizophrenia? ›

In general, 1% of people across the world have schizophrenia. Anyone can develop this condition, but it happens equally in both men and women. While children can develop schizophrenia, this is rare - the average age to develop schizophrenia for men is 18, and for women, 25.

How long does undifferentiated schizophrenia last? ›

One of the present symptoms for diagnosis must be delusions, hallucinations, or disorganized speech. Since the onset of symptoms, major functioning impairment has been seen for the majority of the experience. Symptoms persist for at least 6 months, continuously, and include at least 1 month of active phase symptoms.

What are the treatments of undifferentiated schizophrenia? ›

Medication, particularly antipsychotics, is the most common treatment for undifferentiated schizophrenia. Some antipsychotics include: Zyprexa (olanzapine) Risperdal (risperidone)

What is the most common type of schizophrenia? ›

Paranoid schizophrenia

This is the most common type of schizophrenia.

What are 3 criteria for a schizophrenia diagnosis? ›

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, (DSM-5), to meet the criteria for diagnosis of schizophrenia, the patient must have experienced at least 2 of the following symptoms : Delusions. Hallucinations. Disorganized speech.

Which type of schizophrenia does someone have if they do not respond to their surroundings? ›

Catatonia can be its own disorder, but people with catatonic schizophrenia often have negative symptoms of schizophrenia and are not very responsive. They may not react to stimuli, stay in strange body positions, make odd movements, or even have rigid limbs that will stay in the position that they are moved to.

Does Lexapro make schizophrenia worse? ›

No adverse effects of escitalopram were reported by patients during the trial. In our prospective 12-week open-label study, escitalopram 20 mg/day was well tolerated and improved OC symptoms in schizophrenia patients.

Can a person with schizophrenia act normal? ›

With the right treatment and self-help, many people with schizophrenia are able to regain normal functioning and even become symptom-free.

Does schizophrenia worsen with age? ›

Schizophrenia is a chronic disorder that may wax and wane in severity, but it does not typically worsen with age. 1 For some people, the symptoms of schizophrenia will improve over time while for others the symptoms will stay the same or get worse.

What can trigger schizophrenia? ›

Some people may be prone to schizophrenia, and a stressful or emotional life event might trigger a psychotic episode.
...
The main psychological triggers of schizophrenia are stressful life events, such as:
  • bereavement.
  • losing your job or home.
  • divorce.
  • the end of a relationship.
  • physical, sexual or emotional abuse.

Can people with schizophrenia live a normal life? ›

It is possible for individuals with schizophrenia to live a normal life, but only with good treatment. Residential care allows for a focus on treatment in a safe place, while also giving patients tools needed to succeed once out of care.

How schizophrenia affects the brain? ›

In schizophrenia, dopamine is tied to hallucinations and delusions. That's because brain areas that "run" on dopamine may become overactive. Antipsychotic drugs stop this. Glutamate is a chemical involved in the part of the brain that forms memories and helps us learn new things.

When does schizophrenia develop? ›

In most people with schizophrenia, symptoms generally start in the mid- to late 20s, though it can start later, up to the mid-30s. Schizophrenia is considered early onset when it starts before the age of 18. Onset of schizophrenia in children younger than age 13 is extremely rare.

What food is good for schizophrenia? ›

People with schizophrenia tend to eat diets higher in fat and lower in fiber. Make sure your diet includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Eating a healthy diet can also help you avoid the weight gain that antipsychotic medicines may cause.

Can you recover from schizophrenia without medication? ›

New study challenges our understanding of schizophrenia as a chronic disease that requires lifelong treatment. A new study shows that 30 per cent of patients with schizophrenia manage without antipsychotic medicine after ten years of the disease, without falling back into a psychosis.

What drug is most used for schizophrenia? ›

Haloperidol, fluphenazine, and chlorpromazine are known as conventional, or typical, antipsychotics and have been used to treat schizophrenia for years. However, they sometimes have movement-related side effects, such as tremors and dystonia, a condition that causes involuntary muscle contractions.

What type of schizophrenia has the best prognosis? ›

Several factors have been associated with a better overall prognosis: Being female, rapid (vs. insidious) onset of symptoms, older age of first episode, predominantly positive (rather than negative) symptoms, presence of mood symptoms, and good pre-illness functioning.

What jobs can schizophrenics do? ›

People with schizophrenia hold all kinds of positions, including senior managers and other professionals, cleaners and laborers, and salespeople. You may not have experience in a certain field, but if the job tasks fit your abilities, give it a try. Keep an open mind. You may want to work full time.

How do schizophrenics act? ›

Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder in which people interpret reality abnormally. Schizophrenia may result in some combination of hallucinations, delusions, and extremely disordered thinking and behavior that impairs daily functioning, and can be disabling.

What is a high functioning schizophrenia? ›

High functioning schizophrenia means you still experience symptoms but you're able to participate at work, school, and in your personal life to a higher degree than others with the condition. There is no particular diagnosis. With the right treatment plan, schizophrenia symptoms can be managed.

Is there a blood test for schizophrenia? ›

Blood tests and imaging

If schizophrenia is suspected, a complete blood count (CBC) test is helpful to monitor the general health of the patient and rule out other conditions that may have been responsible for their symptoms.

What is the best treatment for schizophrenia? ›

Antipsychotics. Antipsychotics are usually recommended as the initial treatment for the symptoms of an acute schizophrenic episode. They work by blocking the effect of the chemical dopamine on the brain.

What type of schizophrenia is in A Beautiful Mind? ›

John Nash was played by Russell Crowe who received a nomination for Best Actor. The movie focuses on Nash's struggle with paranoid schizophrenia during the 1940s and 1950s. While the movie takes a few dramatic liberties with its depiction of schizophrenia, it also provides a fairly accurate portrayal of the disease.

What is it called when someone with schizophrenia makes up words? ›

In fact, language disturbance is a major feature of schizophrenia. 4. A person is said to have schizophasia when his speech is jumbled, repetitious, and simply doesn't make sense. This speech may feature neologisms, which are made-up words or expressions or simply be mumbled and impossible to understand.

How do schizophrenics dress? ›

Schizophrenic patients often wear redundant or multiple layers of clothing, with no clear correlation to the ambient temperature or other weather conditions.

What is the best antidepressant for schizophrenia? ›

Antidepressant Medication

However the newer SSRIs such as Citalopram, Sertraline, Fluoxetine and Paroxetine are effective at alleviating depression in most cases of schizophrenia.

Is lorazepam used to treat schizophrenia? ›

Lorazepam-induced Short-term Remission of Symptoms in a Case of Paranoid Schizophrenia - PMC. The . gov means it's official.

What can happens if you take antipsychotics and don't need them? ›

If you stop antipsychotics suddenly it can cause 'rebound psychosis'. This means that the symptoms of your illness return suddenly, and you may become unwell again.

Can you drive if you have schizophrenia? ›

Having schizophrenia could affect your ability to drive. If you've had or currently suffer from a medical condition or disability that may affect your driving you must tell the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Why do schizophrenics stare? ›

Why focus on what you call "eye-gaze processing"? People with schizophrenia have trouble inferring other people's mental states. Eye-gaze direction is a ubiquitous social cue that we use to direct attention and infer what other people are thinking, what their intentions are.

What is the fear of schizophrenia called? ›

Dementophobia is a type of phobia that involves the fear of madness or insanity. People who have this fear are afraid that they are going insane or losing touch with reality.

Does schizophrenia show up on MRI? ›

RESULTS. In patients with schizophrenia, MR imaging shows a smaller total brain volume and enlarged ventricles. Specific subcortical regions are affected, with reduced hippocampal and thalamic volumes, and an increase in the volume of the globus pallidus.

Can schizophrenia turn into dementia? ›

Researchers found a significant increase in the risk of developing dementia when a person also had schizophrenia. Another 2018 study found a close correlation between very late onset schizophrenia and developing dementia. People with very late onset schizophrenia had a threefold increase in dementia rates.

Does schizophrenia cause memory loss? ›

While schizophrenia typically causes hallucinations and delusions, many people with the disorder also have cognitive deficits, including problems with short- and long-term memory.

Which drugs cause schizophrenia? ›

Specific drugs like cocaine, cannabis, LSD, or amphetamines can trigger symptoms of schizophrenia in those more susceptible to the condition. Using stimulant drugs like cocaine or amphetamines can cause psychosis, leading to relapse in those recovering from an earlier psychotic episode.

Who is at risk for schizophrenia? ›

Although schizophrenia can occur at any age, the average age of onset tends to be in the late teens to the early 20s for men, and the late 20s to early 30s for women. It is uncommon for schizophrenia to be diagnosed in a person younger than 12 or older than 40. It is possible to live well with schizophrenia.

Can schizophrenia go away? ›

Most people with schizophrenia make a recovery, although many will experience the occasional return of symptoms (relapses). Support and treatment can help you to manage your condition and the impact it has on your life.

What is the average lifespan of a schizophrenic? ›

Using data from 11 studies, Hjorthøj et al (2016) showed that schizophrenia was associated with an average of 14.5 years of potential life lost. The loss was greater for men (15.9) than for women (13.6). Life expectancy was greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, at 64.7 years (59.9 for men and 67.6 for women).

Should someone with schizophrenia live alone? ›

Many people with schizophrenia are able to live independently. However, this is not the case for all people with schizophrenia. There are several things that people with schizophrenia should know to overcome the difficulties of their illness and live on their own: Early diagnosis and treatment leads to better outcomes.

Do schizophrenics like to be alone? ›

Loneliness is a highly prevalent experience in schizophrenia. Theoretical models developed in the general population propose that loneliness is tantamount to a feeling of being unsafe, is accompanied by enhanced environmental threat perception, and leads to poor physical, emotional, and cognitive functioning.

What is it like living with schizophrenia? ›

Individuals will show a lack of interest and pleasure in everyday life. There may be a lack of ability to maintain planned activities, and a person will often not speak when spoken to. A person who shows negative symptoms often needs help with everyday activities, such as personal hygiene.

How does schizophrenia affect the body physically? ›

Compared with the general population, schizophrenia patients are at increased risk of weight gain, abdominal obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease.

Is schizophrenia caused by too much dopamine? ›

The authors hypothesize that schizophrenia is characterized by abnormally low prefrontal dopamine activity (causing deficit symptoms) leading to excessive dopamine activity in mesolimbic dopamine neurons (causing positive symptoms).

Do schizophrenics know they are sick? ›

One is that people with the disorder often don't realize they're ill, so they're unlikely to go to a doctor for help. Another issue is that many of the changes leading up to schizophrenia, called the prodrome, can mirror other normal life changes.

How Can schizophrenia be cured permanently? ›

While there is no known cure, it is possible to live a meaningful and happy life with schizophrenia. There are many effective treatments, best provided by a team. These include medication, psychotherapy, behavioral therapy, and social services, as well as tools to help you stay in school or keep working.

Does trauma cause schizophrenia? ›

Can trauma cause schizophrenia? Research and experts suggest trauma, especially severe childhood trauma, can increase the likelihood of someone developing schizophrenia or expressing similar symptoms later in life.

What are the 5 types of schizophrenia? ›

Types of Schizophrenia
  • Paranoid Schizophrenia. Prior to 2013, paranoid schizophrenia was the most commonly diagnosed type of schizophrenia. ...
  • Catatonic Schizophrenia. ...
  • Disorganized Schizophrenia. ...
  • Residual Schizophrenia. ...
  • Undifferentiated Schizophrenia.
9 Feb 2021

Does Lexapro make schizophrenia worse? ›

No adverse effects of escitalopram were reported by patients during the trial. In our prospective 12-week open-label study, escitalopram 20 mg/day was well tolerated and improved OC symptoms in schizophrenia patients.

How many types of schizophrenia are there? ›

There are five different types of schizophrenia; all of which are determined by the symptoms shown by the patient. Paranoid schizophrenia is the most common subtype of schizophrenia in the United States and typically reveals itself during a person's teenage or young adulthood years.

Can schizophrenia go away? ›

Most people with schizophrenia make a recovery, although many will experience the occasional return of symptoms (relapses). Support and treatment can help you to manage your condition and the impact it has on your life.

What type of mental illness is schizophrenia? ›

Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder in which people interpret reality abnormally. Schizophrenia may result in some combination of hallucinations, delusions, and extremely disordered thinking and behavior that impairs daily functioning, and can be disabling. People with schizophrenia require lifelong treatment.

What type of schizophrenia has the best prognosis? ›

Several factors have been associated with a better overall prognosis: Being female, rapid (vs. insidious) onset of symptoms, older age of first episode, predominantly positive (rather than negative) symptoms, presence of mood symptoms, and good pre-illness functioning.

What is the best antidepressant for schizophrenia? ›

Antidepressant Medication

However the newer SSRIs such as Citalopram, Sertraline, Fluoxetine and Paroxetine are effective at alleviating depression in most cases of schizophrenia.

What is the main drug used to treat schizophrenia? ›

Haloperidol, fluphenazine, and chlorpromazine are known as conventional, or typical, antipsychotics and have been used to treat schizophrenia for years. However, they sometimes have movement-related side effects, such as tremors and dystonia, a condition that causes involuntary muscle contractions.

Is lorazepam used to treat schizophrenia? ›

Lorazepam-induced Short-term Remission of Symptoms in a Case of Paranoid Schizophrenia - PMC. The . gov means it's official.

What does disorganized behavior look like? ›

behavior that is self-contradictory or inconsistent. It may include childlike silliness, purposeless behavior, unpredictable agitation, or extreme emotional reaction (e.g., laughing after a catastrophe).

What can trigger schizophrenia? ›

Some people may be prone to schizophrenia, and a stressful or emotional life event might trigger a psychotic episode.
...
The main psychological triggers of schizophrenia are stressful life events, such as:
  • bereavement.
  • losing your job or home.
  • divorce.
  • the end of a relationship.
  • physical, sexual or emotional abuse.

What is an example of disorganized thinking? ›

For example: "They're destroying too many cattle and oil just to make soap. If we need soap when you can jump into a pool of water, and then when you go to buy your gasoline, my folks always thought they should, get pop but the best thing to get, is motor oil, and, money..."

What type of schizophrenia is in A Beautiful Mind? ›

John Nash was played by Russell Crowe who received a nomination for Best Actor. The movie focuses on Nash's struggle with paranoid schizophrenia during the 1940s and 1950s. While the movie takes a few dramatic liberties with its depiction of schizophrenia, it also provides a fairly accurate portrayal of the disease.

What jobs can schizophrenics do? ›

People with schizophrenia hold all kinds of positions, including senior managers and other professionals, cleaners and laborers, and salespeople. You may not have experience in a certain field, but if the job tasks fit your abilities, give it a try. Keep an open mind. You may want to work full time.

What part of the brain is schizophrenia in? ›

Schizophrenia is associated with changes in the structure and functioning of a number of key brain systems, including prefrontal and medial temporal lobe regions involved in working memory and declarative memory, respectively.

Videos

1. SCHIZOPHRENIA (Part-2) Classification, Treatment. | ADVANCE NURSING TIP'S
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2. Undifferentiated Schizophrenia
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3. Schizophrenia - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment & pathology
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4. SCHIZOPHRENIA II : TYPES, DIAGONSIS AND MANAGEMENT
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6. Undifferentiated Schizophrenia - Its Definition, Symptoms, Treatments and Other Facts
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